Google Play Store will now suggest you delete unused apps

Google Play Store will now suggest you delete unused apps

first_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Got a full phone? You’re not the only one. Most smartphone users are constantly engaged in a life or death battle for the hard drive of their device, and it seems Google is joining the fight against unused apps, by stepping in to suggest you delete unused apps hogging your phone’s memory. A new feature coming to the Google Play Store will see the app marketplace suggest you remove apps you’re not using to free up space on your phone. It’s an altruistic act as, at the time of writing, I have 30 games I’ve not played in over a year on my phone weighing it down with all that data.Related: Best Android PhonesGoogle Play Store will soon start sending you notifications telling you to “delete unused apps for extra storage”, and from there you can click on the message to be taken to a window full of apps you’ve not opened in some time. This digital shaming should let you see the applications you’ve not opened in a while, and then you can purge them with laser precision with just a few prods of your mighty fingers. It could help you out with cancelling any apps you’ve got active subscriptions for, too. Related: Best iPhone 2019 While you do it, the Play Store will let you know how much space the rogue apps are taking on your machine, so you can know how much you’ve liberated. All the better for storing an untold number of Spotify playlists on your phone. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Honor 20 Pro vs Honor 20 4 big changes you need to

Honor 20 Pro vs Honor 20 4 big changes you need to

first_imgHonor 20 Pro vs Honor 20: These two phones are now official after getting a lavish London-set unveiling. These are the brand’s latest smartphones and have a big focus, as most phones seem to these days, on the camera.The trend of having both a standard and a Pro model of the same numbered flagship has become increasingly popular in 2019, with both OnePlus releasing a OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro along with Huawei doing the same for its P30 line.Now is the turn of Honor. Both the Honor 20 and Honor 20 Pro join the previously announced Honor 20 Lite in the brand’s 2019 range. But what’s the difference?1. The Honor 20 Pro camera is where the serious upgrades areWhat really sets mid-range smartphones apart from each other are cameras. Honor has been pushing its camera tech forward a lot recently and that theme continues with both versions of the Honor 20.Both phones pack four sensors on the back, however how they work is slightly different. Here’s a quick overview of which sensor sits on which phone.You’ll find a main 48-megapixel camera on both, with an f/1.4 aperture on the Honor 20 Pro and an f/1.8 aperture on the regular 20. A wider (and smaller number) aperture lets more light into the sensor and should lead to brighter phones.Above the main sensor sits a 16-megapixel camera with a super wide angle lens – again on both phones.Now, this is where the differences begin to appear. The Honor 20 Pro has an 8-megapixel telephoto camera with the ability to optically zoom at 3x. Zooming was a key feature on the Huawei P30 Pro and it’s one of the standout additions here too.Instead of the telephoto camera, the Honor 20 has a 2-megapixel camera dedicated solely to capturing depth in the portrait mode.Finally, both versions of the Honor 20 have a slightly odd 2-megapixel macro-focussed camera nestled just next to the vertical stripe of main sensors. The singular focus of this camera is to capture highly-detailed shots from about 4cm away from the subject.2. More storage and more RAM if you go Pro even if the chipsets are the sameOne important similarity about the Honor 20 and Honor 20 Pro are the chipsets powering both phones. Honor isn’t sticking a mid-range chipset in one and going all out with the other, instead you’ll find the Kirin 980 in both. This is Huawei and Honor’s current fastest available chipset and it sits in everything from the Huawei Mate 20 to the P30 Pro.What you do get with the Pro model is more RAM and higher storage options. There’s 8GB RAM and 256GB storage in the Pro, while the regular Honor 20 has 6GB and 128GB.3. One phone has the bigger battery – but not by muchAnother small difference here: the Honor 20 Pro has a slightly larger battery.Keeping the Honor 20 chugging along is a 3750mAh cell whereas the Pro model ups that slightly to a 4000mAh version. We’ll have to properly compare the endurance of both to see if that makes much real-world difference.Honor’s 22.5w SuperCharge is available on both phones and it, according to Honor, should give you 50 per cent charge in 30 minutes. That is dependant on you using the included charger.4. Both have the same screen in terms of size, resolution and notchSimilarities in the screen and design of the two phones are clearly apparent. Look at the two devices side-by-side and they’re very similar, even down to the exact same 6.2-inch LCD FHD+ display with a hole-punch notch.The fingerprint sensor is on the side and is flush mounted to the body, rather than sticking out or tucked inside the display.Related: Best mid-range phones5. Honor 20 vs Honor 20 Pro: Pricing and release dateYou’ll be able to pick up the Honor 20 for 499 euros and the Honor 20 Pro for 599 euros. We’re still waiting for UK pricing and release date to be announced. There will likely be no US release date for these phones and there’s, of course, the current Google Ban Huawei and Honor have to contend with. We’ll update this piece when we know more. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Hudsons Bay Co exploring strategic alternatives for Lord Taylor including sale or

Hudsons Bay Co exploring strategic alternatives for Lord Taylor including sale or

first_img Email The Lord & Taylor chain has more than 40 stores in the northeastern and mid-Atlantic regions of the United States as well as its online business.Spencer Platt/Getty Images 0 Comments Comment ← Previous Next → Facebook May 6, 201910:09 AM EDT Filed under News Retail & Marketing Sponsored By: Twitter Recommended For YouOil service firms eye new survival tactics amid weak U.S. marketU.S. mortgage applications drop in latest week -MBAIngram Micro’s Commitment to Providing Critical IT Asset Disposition Services Has Never Been StrongerStocks fall on trade, earnings worry; U.S. Treasury yields fallFed: Sunny outlook for U.S. despite shade thrown by trade TORONTO — Hudson’s Bay Co. says it’s pursuing strategic alternatives for its Lord & Taylor business, including a possible sale or merger.HBC says Lord & Taylor had $1.4 billion in annual revenue in 2018.The Lord & Taylor chain has more than 40 stores in the northeastern and mid-Atlantic regions of the United States as well as its online business.HBC chief executive Helena Foulkes says the retailer is exploring options to position itself for long-term success.HBC previously announced in February that its Canadian retail banner, Home Outfitters, will be discontinued and its 37 locations will be closed this year and that about 20 Saks Off Fifth locations will be closed in the United States.Foulkes says Lord & Taylor remains committed to serving customers across its stores and digital channels throughout the review.  center_img The Canadian Press Join the conversation → Share this storyHudson’s Bay Co exploring strategic alternatives for Lord & Taylor, including sale or merger Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Reddit Featured Stories advertisement More What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Hudson’s Bay Co exploring strategic alternatives for Lord & Taylor, including sale or merger HBC has already announced it was discontinuing Home Outfitters and closing 20 Saks Off Fifth locations last_img read more

Lime in SF If we cant have electric scooters then nobody should

Lime in SF If we cant have electric scooters then nobody should

Source: Charge Forward The city of San Francisco awarded two operating permits for electric scooter sharing companies last month. Lime, one of the two largest electric scooter sharing companies, was denied.Now the company is filing an 11th hour court motion to block anyone from operating electric scooters in the city. more…The post Lime in SF: If we can’t have electric scooters, then nobody should appeared first on Electrek.

Driven Honda Clarity PlugIn Hybrid Video Review

Driven Honda Clarity PlugIn Hybrid Video Review

first_img Kelley Blue Book Tests Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid What other important pieces of information does Mr. Voelk want us to know?Trunk space is respectablePass through is small, so large items may not fitFeels reasonably peppyGas engine kicks in if you accelerate hardGas engine is loudHandling is composedRide is smooth, but you can feel the car’s weightRegen paddles are confusingRegen reverts back even after you set it (unless you’re in Sport mode)No one-pedal drivingPlenty of in-cabin storageSupportive seatsUser interface needs updatingRoomy rear seatsFull active safety suite comes standardDid Tom miss anything? Let us know in the comment section below.Video Description via Driven Car Reviews on YouTube:Long-range electric cars are spendy because they need large expensive batteries. Want an EV that’s budget friendly without the huge price tag or any range anxiety? The Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid could be the answer. It covers most commutes on battery power then switches to gas for cross-country travel. Tom Voelk checks out the Touring model. Source: Electric Vehicle News What does Tom Voelk think of the Clarity PHEV?Tom says the Clarity Plug-In Hybrid is a solid option for those who want to take the plunge into electric car ownership, but are nervous about charging infrastructure and range. He also agrees with most opinions we’ve heard about the Clarity’s “nerdy” exterior styling. However, he reminds us that the cabin is very nice, and that’s where you spend all your time. To top it off, Voelk says the Honda is budget-friendly, at least in comparison to other respectable EV options on the market today.More Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid Content: Auto Reviewer Confused On Details But Enjoys Honda Clarity PHEV What’s It Like To Own A Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid For 8 Months? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 5, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Porsche CEO gives props to Tesla says EVs are coming in masses

Porsche CEO gives props to Tesla says EVs are coming in masses

first_imgPorsche has been making a 180-degree turn on all-electric vehicles in recent years. They are now giving props to Tesla and saying that electric vehicles are coming to the US in masses in a new op-ed in a major newspaper. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Porsche CEO gives props to Tesla, says EVs are coming in masses to the US in op-ed appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

The perfect storm Redirecting family planning funds could undercut STD fight

The perfect storm Redirecting family planning funds could undercut STD fight

first_imgJun 12 2018A Trump administration effort to shift family planning funding toward groups that may not provide comprehensive services and away from organizations that provide abortions could cripple other federal efforts to curb an explosion in sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), some public health officials fear.”This is the perfect storm, and it comes at absolutely the worst time,” said Daniel Daltry, program chief of the HIV/AIDS, STD and Viral Hepatitis Program at the Vermont Department of Health.In 2016, there were more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis reported to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was the highest number of reported cases ever.Now the Department of Health and Human Services has proposed changes to the rules for the federal family planning services program, known as Title X. Daltry and other public health officials fear the changes will make testing and treatment for STDs harder to get.The new rules, if adopted in their current form, would require that Title X services be physically and financially separate from abortion services.Many family planning clinics are committed to offering comprehensive services, including contraception and abortion referrals, said David C. Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, a membership group of public health department STD directors and community organizations. “These principles are near and dear to them, and if the changes are enacted we fear many programs would decide not to take Title X funding.”With less funds, they’d have fewer resources available for STD screening, treatment and outreach.Title X funds have never been permitted to be used for abortions. But President Donald Trump and other Republicans have vowed to cut off all federal funding for Planned Parenthood and other organizations that provide abortions.It’s too soon to know what will happen. The proposed rule was published June 1 and is available for public comment until the end of July.Title X provides grants that fund family planning, STD screening and breast and cervical cancer screening at nearly 4,000 sites nationwide.The program primarily serves low-income, young women, although a growing number of men receive services at Title X funded clinics as well.The clinics are recognized primarily for providing contraceptive services, but the STD screening and treatment services they provide also are critical. Young people ages 15 through 24 accounted for half of all new STD cases in 2016 (the most recent figures available), according to the CDC. One in 4 four adolescent girls who were sexually active had a sexually transmitted disease.People who are infected typically don’t have symptoms. The diseases are generally easy to cure with antibiotics but without treatment can cause serious health problems, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, and may lead to infertility.Even if young people have coverage through their parents’ insurance, many avoid using it, concerned that the health plan may notify their parents that they’ve been tested or treated for a sexually transmitted disease. Instead, they may visit a clinic receiving Title X funding where they can receive confidential services that they pay for on a sliding scale based on their income.Related StoriesStudy: HIV patients continue treatments if health care providers are compassionateReprogramming cells to control HIV infectionPrevalence of anal cancer precursors is higher in women living with HIV than previously reportedDaltry and other public health experts are concerned that proposed changes to the Title X family planning program rules may result in the closing of some Planned Parenthood and other family planning clinics that also provide abortion services.The number of STD clinics funded by local or state governments has dwindled over the past decade, and many states rely on other providers for testing and treatment, Harvey said.With 12 sites in Vermont, “Planned Parenthood has operated as our STD clinic,” said Daltry. No one should live more than a 45-minute drive from a site. And while there are other providers throughout the state, “the same continuum of care might not be offered at all sites.”However, advocates of the Trump administration’s plan point out that some new clinics may also now get Title X funding. Earlier this year, the administration made a point of encouraging providers that emphasize natural family planning methods, sometimes called fertility awareness, to apply for money.The Catholic Medical Association, which on its website emphasizes the need for any national health care legislation to provide “respect for human life” and to not fund “or mandate abortion as a ‘health care benefit,'” applied for Title X funding this year. The organization also notes the importance of “conscience rights for health professionals.”Some Catholic medical practices – like the one where she works — choose not to prescribe birth control pills or other Food and Drug Administration-approved methods of contraception, said Dr. Anne Nolte, a family physician at St. Peter’s Gianna Center, a gynecology and infertility practice in New York City. But “patients are welcome to come to us for STD screening and treatment,” she said.The proposed regulation doesn’t focus on sexually transmitted disease testing and treatment, but it appears in one provision that some advocates find concerning.The rule would require that teenagers who come to a Title X clinic with an STD or who are pregnant be screened to ensure they aren’t victims of sexual abuse.”The idea that every single young person under the age of 18 who is there because they either have [a sexually transmitted infection] or because they need a pregnancy test has to be screened is troubling,” said Kinsey Hasstedt, a senior policy manager at the Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health research and advocacy organization. “They’re there for health care support, and instead they get another level of screening.”Please visit khn.org/columnists to send comments or ideas for future topics for the Insuring Your Health column. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

New study finds increase in use of alternative medicines among children

New study finds increase in use of alternative medicines among children

first_img Source:https://today.uic.edu/use-of-alternative-medicines-has-doubled-among-kids-especially-teens Jun 19 2018A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics shows that since 2003, the use of alternative medicines, such as herbal products and nutraceuticals, among children has doubled. The University of Illinois at Chicago researchers who conducted the study cite an increased use of Omega-3 fatty acids and melatonin among adolescents ages 13 to 18 as the primary driver of the change, despite clinical recommendations against use of such supplements in children.Use of dietary supplements, of which herbal, non-vitamin alternative medicines are one type, remained high but otherwise stable, with approximately one-third of children using a dietary supplement.Study author Dima Qato says the widespread use of supplements among children and the increased use of alternative medicines among teens is worrisome.”Dietary supplements are not required to go through the same FDA regulations and approval process as prescription drugs. As a result, we know very little about their safety and effectiveness, especially in children,” said Qato, assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the UIC College of Pharmacy. “Many dietary supplements have also been implicated in adverse drug events, especially cardiovascular, which is a safety concern.””We simply do not know if there are any benefits to children that outweigh the potential harms, and this study suggests supplement use is widespread and therefore an important, yet often ignored, public health issue,” she said.To study supplement use in children, Qato and her colleagues retrospectively analyzed six recent cycles -; 2003 to 2004 through 2013 to 2014 -; of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. During the in-person survey, participants responded to a dietary supplement questionnaire.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaIf participants indicated supplement use within the last 30 days, they were asked to show the interviewers the containers for all supplements. Each supplement was classified as a nutritional product – those that primarily contain vitamins or minerals – or an alternative medicine and further classified by primary use.In addition to the high prevalence of supplement use, the researchers observed that, when it comes to adolescents, supplement use varied by gender and use patterns may relate to other health issues.”Adolescents are using supplements to treat common health conditions or adverse effects of prescription medications,” said Qato. “For example, we’ve seen an increase in use of melatonin, which is promoted as having sleep benefits. At the same time, other studies have shown an increase in the use of ADHD medications, which we know are associated with a risk for insomnia.”The researchers also found use of Vitamin B products and folic acid were most popular among teenage girls. These supplements are promoted as having benefits against depression. For boys, use of Omega-3 fatty acids -; which are marketed as having cognitive benefits -; and body building supplements were popular.”This suggests that supplement use among children may be targeting specific ailments, but the fact remains that common use of these products in otherwise healthy kids is potentially dangerous,” Qato said. “Parents should be aware of the dangers, especially as many may be purchasing the supplements for their children. Health care providers working with children, especially pediatricians and pharmacists, should also take note of the prevalence of supplement use in this age group and ask patients and parents about such use regularly.”last_img read more

TTUHSC El Pasos colorectal cancer initiative catches the eye of National Cancer

TTUHSC El Pasos colorectal cancer initiative catches the eye of National Cancer

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 30 2018A Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso initiative that is increasing the number of screenings for colorectal cancer across West Texas has caught the eye of the National Cancer Institute.The federal agency has added TTUHSC El Paso’s ACCION (Against Colorectal Cancer in Our Neighborhoods) program to its database of Research-Tested Intervention Programs, making ACCION instructional and educational materials available to public health practitioners across the world.Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the U.S. for both men and women. But in many cases the disease can be cured, or even prevented, with early detection through colorectal cancer screenings.Unfortunately, many at-risk people don’t have easy access to colorectal cancer screenings. Poverty, lack of health insurance, lack of transportation, and low levels of health education are some of the barriers that prevent adults from receiving screenings. The beginning recommended age for colorectal cancer screenings is 50.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyLiving with advanced breast cancerAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsLaunched in 2011 by Navkiran Shokar, M.D., M.P.H., M.A., director for Cancer Prevention and Control at TTUHSC El Paso, ACCION brings colorectal cancer screenings and preventative information to the community, in settings such as churches, health fairs, food pantries, low-income housing complexes, community centers and clinics serving the uninsured. Its aim has been to increase screening rates across West Texas, currently around 50 percent, compared to a national average of about 70 percent. The program has been funded by grants from the Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).”If you get screened and you get the appropriate follow-up, you really do prevent cancer,” Shokar said. “You find it early and the outcome is a lot better.”The program uses promotoras-;bilingual community health care workers-;to connect with at-risk individuals. ACCION currently works with over 160 community organizations to help make screening more accessible.”People have big transportation barriers,” Dr. Shokar said. “They don’t have access to cars, or the person with the transport is working and they only have one car. It’s very important that this program go to the community where people live, work and play, and that’s what we try to do.”The success of the program has led to additional CPRIT funding. In August 2017, CPRIT awarded Dr. Shokar a three-year, $3.7 million grant to implement ACCION in major hospital and clinic systems throughout El Paso County. The grant will also be used to expand the program into West Texas; ACCION’s service area will now cover a 25-county area by partnering with service providers in those areas.And now, thanks to the National Cancer Institute, the methods and materials behind the ACCION’s success can reach across the globe. Source:https://elpaso.ttuhsc.edu/last_img read more

Bee venom may be effective treatment for eczema

Bee venom may be effective treatment for eczema

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Bee venom and its major component, melittin, may be effective treatments for atopic dermatitis (or eczema), according to a British Journal of Pharmacology study.Through studies conducted in mice and in human cells, investigators found that bee venom and melittin suppress inflammation through various mechanisms on immune cells and inflammatory molecules.”This study demonstrated that bee venom and melittin have immunomodulatory activity, and such activity was associated with the regulation of T helper cell differentiation, thereby ameliorating the inflammatory skin diseases caused by atopic dermatitis,” the authors wrote.​Source: https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/british-journal-pharmacology/bee-venom-may-help-treat-eczemalast_img read more

US House moves to block labeling of GM foods

US House moves to block labeling of GM foods

first_imgThe U.S. House of Representatives yesterday approved a bill that would block states and localities from requiring mandatory labeling of food made from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). It would also set up a voluntary federal program for manufacturers to certify foods that don’t contain GMOs.The bill’s supporters—Republicans, some Democrats, and the food industry—call the bill a science-based effort to balance consumer right-to-know concerns with the need for a uniform national policy. Opponents of the bill, including environmental and food activists and liberal Democrats, argue that it would deny people the right to know what is in their food.On a 275 to 150 vote, with 45 Democrats joining 230 Republicans, the House approved H.R. 1599, the Safe and Affordable Food Labeling Act, a measure sponsored by Representative Mike Pompeo (R–KS). The bill’s future in the Senate is unclear and the White House has yet to weigh in. But proponents called it a first step toward a badly needed update to the nation’s food policy in the biotechnology age. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “We believe that this is a reasonable, workable solution that balances consumer demand to know more about their food with what we know about the safety of the foods the we produce,” Representative Collin Peterson (D–MN), one of the bill’s supporters, said yesterday on the House floor.The bill comes as lawmakers’ attempt to respond to a growing movement across the country to enact state and local laws that require the labeling of GMOs or foods derived from them. Vermont became the first U.S. state to enact a mandatory GMO labeling law in 2014.  Connecticut and Maine recently enacted measures that call for GMO labeling if other nearby states also enact labeling laws. Sixty-four nations require GMO labeling, but the U.S. political environment has long prevented the adoption of any national policy on the growing use of biotechnology in food.The burgeoning state and local labeling push stems from several concerns raised by activist groups. Some have argued that the GMOs are unsafe to eat (claims rejected by top scientific and health bodies) or not sufficiently reviewed. Others have suggested that it’s simply a matter of consumers’ right to know what’s in their food. But opponents of labeling argue that it unfairly singles out GMOs while ignoring crops bred by other methods. And food producers have complained that a patchwork of state and local labeling requirements could confuse consumers and raise food prices.H.R. 1599’s backers believe their bill strikes a good balance. The bill would block mandatory GMO labeling laws such as Vermont’s. But it also would set up a voluntary, national program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture for food producers who want to seek non-GMO certification. As an added measure, the bill would make mandatory a currently voluntary consultation process that regulators have long used to review the safety of GMOs, which allows the Food and Drug Administration to block the sale of any food it deems unsafe or lacking sufficient safety data. (Although voluntary, Grist’s Nathanael Johnson has reported that all GMOs sold in the U.S. have gone through this review process.)Pompeo noted before the vote that top scientific and health authorities—including the National Academy of Sciences and the World Health Organization—have said that current GMOs are just as safe for human consumption as their non-GMO counterparts, and unlikely to pose greater risks to the environment. To require labeling of all GMOs, he said, would be to ignore this scientific consensus.Responses from Democrats, most of whom were critical, varied in tone. Rep. Peter Welch (D–VT) said the bill would effectively bar states and localities from giving consumers more information while enacting a relatively weak federal system. “This is not a question of whether the science says that GMO foods cause medical issues,” he said on the House floor. (The Environmental Working Group, based in Washington, D.C., offered a similar criticism in response to the vote, dubbing the bill the “Deny Americans the Right to Know (DARK) Act.”)Rep. Frank Pallone (D–NJ), top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, offered more measured criticism. He agreed with Pompeo that GMOs are safe, saying that they otherwise wouldn’t be in commerce. “Although I don’t know of any scientific reasons to require genetically engineered foods to be labeled differently than nongenetically engineered foods, I do not believe we will be engendering confidence in these foods” if we pass the bill, he said on the House floor. Environmental groups also worry about bill language that they contend would block states and localities from regulating “natural” claims on food labels and approving other kinds of laws related to GMOs.But Pompeo said that “it is not the place of government, government at any level, to arbitrarily step in and mandate that one plant product should be labeled based solely on how it was bred while another, identical product is free of a government warning label because the producer chose a different breeding technology. That’s unscientific, and it’s bad public policy.”It’s not clear whether the Senate will consider similar legislation.center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Podcast A farewell to Sciences editorinchief how mosquito spit makes us sick

Podcast A farewell to Sciences editorinchief how mosquito spit makes us sick

first_imgSiegfried Klaus Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.  [Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Siegfried Klaus]last_img

Podcast the odds of odd particles tunneling through Earth and what makes

Podcast the odds of odd particles tunneling through Earth and what makes

first_imgStuart Rankin/Flickr Hoping to spot subatomic particles called neutrinos smashing into Earth, the balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) detector has circled the South Pole four times. ANITA has yet to detect those particles, but it has twice seen oddball radio signals that could be evidence of something even weirder: some heavier particle unknown to physicists’ standard model, burrowing up through Earth. Science writer Adrian Cho joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the possibility that this reading could lead to a big change in physics.Next, host Meagan Cantwell asks researcher Ben Dalziel what makes a bad—or good—flu year. Traditionally, research has focused on two factors: climate, which impacts how long the virus stays active after a sneeze or cough, and changes in the virus itself, which can influence its infectiousness. But these factors don’t explain every pattern. Dalziel, a population biologist in the Departments of Integrative Biology and Mathematics at Oregon State University in Corvallis, explains how humidity and community size shape the way influenza spreads.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript of this episode (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Stuart Rankin/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

Junk DNA may help yeast survive stress

Junk DNA may help yeast survive stress

first_img ‘Junk DNA’ may help yeast survive stress Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Mitch LeslieJan. 16, 2019 , 2:30 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Yeast may rely on introns to help them survive hard times. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source Like deleted scenes snipped out of a movie, some sequences in our genes end up on the cutting-room floor, and cells don’t use them to make proteins. Now, two studies find that these segments, known as introns, help yeast survive during hard times. The research uncovers another possible function for a type of DNA that scientists once thought was useless.“They are very strong, very convincing, and very exciting results,” says evolutionary molecular biologist Scott Roy of San Francisco State University in California, who wasn’t connected to the studies. The research “opens a whole new paradigm of what introns could be doing.” It also answers the long-standing question of why yeast has kept what was formerly considered “junk DNA,” says yeast microbiologist Guillaume Chanfreau of the University of California, Los Angeles.Introns are prevalent in plants and fungi, as well as in humans and other animals—each of our roughly 20,000 genes carries an average of eight. When one of our cells starts to make a protein from a particular gene, enzymes generate an RNA copy that includes the introns. Next, the cell snips the introns out of the RNA and splices the remaining portions of the molecule back together. This edited RNA molecule then serves as a guide to build the protein. Removing introns requires a lot of energy—and a complex set of molecular shears—suggesting the sequences evolved to carry out specific functions. After initially dismissing them as junk, researchers have recently begun to identify some of these roles. For instance, introns in some genes may help control how much of the corresponding proteins the cell manufactures.But in baker’s yeast, an organism that has ditched most of its introns (it has just 295 for some 6000 genes), the functions of most of the sequences are murky. Scientists who deleted individual introns, for example, found that in most cases the fungi were unfazed.However, researchers typically haven’t looked at yeast under conditions it would face in the wild, where it could endure periods of food scarcity that don’t occur in the lab. To determine what happens during deprivation, RNA biologist Sherif Abou Elela of the University of Sherbrooke in Canada and colleagues systematically deleted introns from yeast, producing hundreds of strains, each of which was missing all of the introns from one gene. The researchers then grew combinations of these modified strains alongside normal fungi.When food was scarce, most of the intron-lacking strains rapidly died out, the team reports today in Nature. They couldn’t compete with normal yeast. However, in cultures with more nutrients, the altered yeast had the advantage. “If you are in good times, it’s a burden” to have introns, Abou Elela says. “In bad times, it’s beneficial.”Molecular biologist David Bartel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge and colleagues independently chanced on similar results. They were measuring the amounts of different RNA molecules in yeast cells, and they expected most introns to quickly deteriorate after they were snipped out of their parental RNA strand. But as they report today in a separate paper in Nature, they noticed that large numbers of introns built up in cells growing in crowded cultures.“It was incredibly bizarre,” says Bartel’s former graduate student Jeffrey Morgan, now a molecular biologist at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Like Abou Elela’s team, Bartel’s group found that introns aided yeast under duress but harmed cells living under more favorable conditions. The scientists suspect the introns help the stressed-out yeast rein in growth.Although how these introns provide their benefits remains unclear, the two studies suggest similar mechanisms. As the yeast’s environment turns harsh, introns become more abundant and may effectively clog the molecular shears that normally snip them out of RNAs, slowing down the synthesis of some proteins and allowing the cells to conserve their resources. That may seem like a convoluted process, but “evolution doesn’t always choose the simplest solution,” Bartel says.last_img read more

Fearing nodeal Brexit European funder orders UK researchers to transfer grants

Fearing nodeal Brexit European funder orders UK researchers to transfer grants

first_img By Erik StokstadApr. 25, 2019 , 11:05 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe On 2 April, COST asked the 20 networks administered by U.K. researchers to prepare to move their grants to a non-U.K. partner. Other European programs that fund multination collaborations, such as the European Union’s Horizon 2020, have not required U.K. leaders to hand over the reins in advance of Brexit. (COST is an intergovernmental organization and not part of the European Union, although its funding for grants comes from Horizon 2020.)The decision is rushed, participants say, given that the deadline for Brexit has been pushed back to 31 October. It was also a surprise that COST did not propose this change in the leadup to the previous deadline, 29 March, when a no-deal Brexit was a growing concern across Europe. “We completely appreciate that the timelines are very short,” says Ronald de Bruin, director of the COST Association. “It was not a light decision.”De Bruin says the key factor is that COST’s annual grant payments occur on 1 May. If a no-deal Brexit happens in October, then COST will have to cancel the grant contracts to U.K. institutions, because the European Union does not allow Horizon 2020 funds to be spent by nonassociated nations. New administrators for U.K.-led grants—about 6% of the total—would need to be found in the middle of the grant cycle. COST would have to try to recover the unspent funds and potentially face audits and legal challenges. “It would lead to an existential risk for our association,” de Bruin says.Five grant holders have already made the change. Others are waiting to see whether COST changes its policy about transferring grants. “I’m not going to move it until I absolutely have to,” says Walton, who leads a network on studying the Milky Way with the European Gaia satellite.It’s not easy to find a new grant administrator, because the job requires a capability to reimburse participants and training in Brussels. Because of the funding uncertainty, Bouzarovski could not renew the contract of his administrator.Bouzarovski is considering postponing two upcoming events for his network in June: a session at EU Sustainable Energy Week , and a training event. “I fear that the appropriate procedures might not be in place.” Simona Francese, a forensic scientist at Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom and chair of a COST grant on forensic science, is worried she may not be able to fund 10 students to attend a forensic science summer school in late May while she transfers administration to a partner in Austria.Bouzarovski started a petition to ask COST to reverse the change until a no-deal Brexit looks imminent. More than 300 have signed on. But success looks unlikely, and yesterday he closed the petition. Bouzarovski says he will move his grant as soon as he finds someone to take it on. “We cannot risk any further disruption.” A European funder has taken action against U.K. researchers in advance of Brexit. The prospect of Brexit, the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, has loomed long and large over researchers, but the effects on funding, so far, have been speculative. Now, a European funding agency has made a pre-emptive strike in advance of Brexit, changing a policy that directly impacts grants in the United Kingdom. The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Association, in Brussels, is requiring that U.K. grant holders shift financial administration to a partner in Europe by 1 May.COST says the change will prevent disruption if Brexit occurs without a deal to smooth the transition, and that it does not affect participation by U.K. scientists. But U.K. grant holders say the policy change is premature, disruptive to research—and in at least one case it has led to a staff layoff. “The bureaucratic nightmare of moving these grants is pretty horrendous,” says Nic Walton, an astronomer at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.COST hands out about €33 million per year in grants designed to stimulate and expand research networks. The 4-year grants, each about €500,000, typically include dozens of partners in Europe and elsewhere. The funding covers travel to workshops, training, and other outreach and networking events. Often, the events lead to larger collaborative research proposals, says Stefan Bouzarovski, a geographer at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, who chairs a network on improving access to household energy with more than 200 members in 40 countries. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email Fearing no-deal Brexit, European funder orders U.K. researchers to transfer grants iStock.com/rami_hakala Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Traffic may be making your allergies worse

Traffic may be making your allergies worse

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email By Priyanka RunwalDec. 7, 2018 , 3:25 PM Traffic may be making your allergies worse Then the researchers mapped roadside ragweed plants for two consecutive years to understand how much ragweed populations grew in the direction of traffic movement. In the second year, the team recorded twice as many seedlings flourishing in the direction of traffic movement versus the opposite direction, where the influence of cars was almost nil.The study, which will be published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, is the first to link spread of an invasive species to traffic patterns. Its results suggest bad allergy seasons could be tamped down by requiring municipalities to closely mow roadside plants. But the right time to mow would be shortly before seeds are ripe—otherwise, mowers would spray them even farther afield. Andreas Lemke Ragweed, the bane of summer and autumn allergy sufferers, spreads vigorously with help from a surprising source: our cars and trucks. A new study finds chaotic wakes of air currents from heavy traffic can disperse ragweed seeds tens of meters from their starting point—a huge boost from the usual 1-meter travel radius of seeds from their parent plants.The researchers set up a field experiment to determine how far ragweed seeds traveled on a busy road with fast cars, versus less busy roads. In each trial, they placed 100 seeds painted in fluorescent color along the edge of roads, where seeds would normally drop, and let moving vehicles decide their fate. They then returned with ultraviolet torchlights to mark the new positions of seeds.Within 48 hours, the seeds had settled into new spots. Most remained close to the starting location. But air currents from heavy traffic propelled some seeds tens of meters away, with the most distant traveling 71 meters—about two-thirds the length of a U.S. football field. Even on roads with less traffic, seeds still scattered up to 40 meters.last_img read more

How far out can we forecast the weather Scientists have a new

How far out can we forecast the weather Scientists have a new

first_imgChaos from storms and other small-scale phenomena will likely limit weather forecasts to 2 weeks. Last month, as much of the United States shivered in Arctic cold, weather models predicted a seemingly implausible surge of balmy, springlike warmth. A week later, that unlikely forecast came true—testimony to the remarkable march of such models. Since the 1980s, they’ve added a new day of predictive power with each new decade. Today, the best forecasts run out to 10 days with real skill, leading meteorologists to wonder just how much further they can push useful forecasts.A new study suggests a humbling answer: another 4 or 5 days. In the regions of the world where most people live, the midlatitudes, “2 weeks is about right. It’s as close to be the ultimate limit as we can demonstrate,” says Fuqing Zhang, a meteorologist at Pennsylvania State University in State College who led the work, accepted for publication in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.Forecasters must contend with the atmosphere’s turbulent flows, which nest and build on each other as they create clouds, power storms, and push forward cold fronts. A tiny disruption in one layer of turbulence can quickly snowball, infecting the next with its error. A 1969 paper by Massachusetts Institute of Technology mathematician and meteorologist Edward Lorenz introduced this dynamic, later dubbed the “butterfly effect.” His research showed that two nearly identical atmospheric models can diverge widely after 2 weeks because of an initial disturbance as minute as a butterfly flapping its wings. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe How far out can we forecast the weather? Scientists have a new answer By Paul VoosenFeb. 14, 2019 , 9:30 AMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email iStock.com/ tonisvisuals “That was a revolutionary insight,” says Richard Rotunno, a meteorologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, who was not involved in the new study. If real, this 2-week descent into chaos would set a fundamental limit to the atmosphere’s predictability.Lorenz’s idea has been validated in theory. But until recently, global weather prediction models lacked the high resolution needed to test it by recreating the storm-forming processes driving the atmosphere’s chaos. Zhang hoped that the next generation of supercomputer-powered weather models, including those run by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS), would provide a credible test. Along with colleagues, he convinced the weather agencies to let them chew up expensive computing cycles running identical versions of several real-life weather events.Typically, weather models are fed observations from satellites, balloons, and other outposts, generating what are known as initial conditions. These renderings are far from perfect, and it’s difficult to know whether a model’s growing unreliability as it runs is due to its mismatch with reality or atmospheric chaos. Improving how these observations are sucked into computer models has played a big part in improving forecasts, and it has helped the European model outdo its competitors.The European model, like most of its peers, accounts for the remaining uncertainties in its initial conditions by running multiple versions of an event side by side, each with a slightly tweaked start, to come up with a consensus forecast. In Zhang’s experiments, he reduced this variation tenfold, essentially pretending that the model had a near-perfect view of the weather. He and his colleagues then ran the European model 120 times, with each run simulating 20 days, to recreate two large-scale weather events: a December 2015 cold snap in Northern Europe and June 2016 downpours in China. They also ran the cold snap using the next version of the U.S. Global Forecast System, which—barring another government shutdown—should deploy to forecasters next month.On both models, the renditions steadily diverged until—at the 2-week mark—they appeared wholly unrelated. In effect, the models’ forecasting skill fell to zero at that point. “It’s a very credible result,” says Eugenia Kalnay, a meteorologist at the University of Maryland in College Park who previously led the NWS’s modeling arm. Some researchers doubted Lorenz’s model, given that it lacked some important atmospheric features, she says, but this shows the underlying idea is sound. “It’s nice because it’s simple.”Two weeks may not be the absolute limit, Rotunno says. A similar exercise that ran last year on NCAR’s next-generation model found that the models started diverging between 2 weeks and 3 weeks. However, that model is not as battle-tested as the European gold standard, and the study could afford few runs, limiting its sample size. “At a practical level, they’re not going to issue those 3-week forecasts,” Rotunno says.Still, Zhang adds, it’s heartening to know that there’s room to improve on the gains of the last few decades. He saw those benefits firsthand last month when his airline suggested he rebook a flight to London 5 days in advance due to a potential snowstorm. He heeded the forecasters’ advice and had an enjoyable extra day in London. His original flight? Canceled.*Correction, 19 February, 12:55 p.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated the timing of the simulated cold snap and implied the U.S. model ran both weather events, rather than only one.last_img read more

NBA Team Considers Hiring GM With Racist Past

NBA Team Considers Hiring GM With Racist Past

first_imgBoston College v DukeSource: Lance King / GettyThe NBA’s franchise in the nation’s capital seemed to be moving closer to hiring a high-ranking executive who previously resigned from another team for what has been described as a racist act at worst and an implicitly biased flub at best. If Danny Ferry were to become the Washington Wizards’ next general manager — the team invited him back for a second interview last week — he would be completing one of the most improbable comebacks in sports away from the court or field. Given the recent anti-gentrification surge in D.C., exacerbated in part by a white man suggesting Howard University relocate its historic Black college campus, Ferry, who was a local high school star in nearby Maryland, may just be the last thing Chocolate City’s pro basketball team needs in its current social and economic atmosphere.SEE ALSO:Pamela Turner Is Buried While Texas Cop Who Killed Her Is Already Back At WorkJudge Unsealed Jussie Smollett’s Case Because He Talked To The Media To be completely clear, Ferry did not write those words. But since he is a college-educated longtime NBA executive who played for 12 seasons before transitioning to the work at the executive level in a professional sports league dominated by Black men, common sense would lead one to believe that Ferry should have simply known better than to utter those very racist words whether he wrote them or not. That same logic would suggest that he would have stopped reading after the first “African” comment. But Ferry kept on going, which, Gearon said, ultimately got him to step down.“Ferry completed the racial slur by describing the player (and impliedly all persons of African descent) as a two-faced liar and cheat,” Gearon said in the letter he wrote to ownership calling for Ferry’s resignation.Deng, in turn, responded by saying, “I’m proud to say I actually have a lot of African in me, not just ‘a little.’” NBA star Carmelo Anthony went on the record and said of the Hawks that “[There] ain’t nobody [who] would want to go there.” The resulted in Ferry’s leave of absence and then firing, the latter of which was a move that NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said he didn’t approve of. Ferry and Silver are both alumni of Duke University while Deng attended the school for one season before turning pro.John Thompson, the former head men’s basketball coach at Georgetown University, recently defended Ferry.“Anybody who knows me knows I am racially conscientious, and if I thought he was [a racist], I would say that, but that is the meanest thing that I have heard,” the 77-year-old basketball legend said Tuesday during an interview on The Team 980′s Rick “Doc” Walker’s radio show. Unpacking Mayor Pete’s ‘Douglass Plan’ For Black America The Evolving Relevance Of ‘The Talk’ You could argue Danny Ferry is why Bron left the Cavs the first time lmao— .d (@Domo_LXXXVI) May 21, 2019 That truth was never more apparent than the present as Pelicans superstar forward Anthony Davis was expected to leave the team this summer in favor of a franchise that prioritized winning. Davis, who could earn $87 million more with the Pelicans than without them, was reportedly planning to leave even though the team recently won the coveted first overall pick in the NBA Draft next month. But even the prospect of playing alongside the once-in-a-generation talent of Zion Williamson was seemingly not enough to keep Davis playing for a team that Ferry was helping to run.We’ve seen the NBA, the most progressive of the four major professional sports leagues, react to racism the right way in the past. But one has to wonder if the same level of apparent racist tolerance shown by Ferry’s second chance with the Pelicans would be afforded to someone, let alone a Black executive, who was guilty of reciting anti-Semitic stereotypes in describing a prospective player, no matter what the context.The Wizards already have real problems on their hands — an injury prone star point guard with an inflated salary and the baggage of having Dwight Howard on your team, for starters — so it may not make sense to add what could potentially be another problem of upsetting a loyal fan base that just saw its favorite team woefully underachieve this past season. Of course, no one called Ferry an actual racist. He just happened to willingly read words without stopping regardless of their racist content. But Thompson’s impassioned defense appeared to gloss over the very question most of Ferry critics have asked to no avail: Why would he have kept reading those words?Conspiracy theorists have pointed to Gearon’s contempt for Ferry and claimed he leaked the private report to the media to prompt the public firing. But even if that was true, Gearon never would have had the ammunition he was looking for if Ferry didn’t voluntarily arm him by continuing to read those words. Everything We Know About Sadie Roberts-Joseph’s Murder Investigationcenter_img Twitter Clowns John Wall With Memes Mocking His USA Basketball Team Photo More By Bruce C.T. Wright John Wall Team USA Photo Ferry said some shit he shouldn’t have in a private meeting. It was racist. But he was reading someone else’s words in a scouting report. It was surreptitiously recorded as part of a feud between ownership factions in ATL. I think he paid more than his penance. 5/— Ben Becker (@_BenBecker) May 20, 2019Did Ferry not notice that what he was reading was just plain wrong on a basic human level and actually had nothing to do with basketball?Still, despite it all, Ferry was ultimately hired by the New Orleans Pelicans in 2016 to be a special adviser to its general manager. But beyond those racist words he had spoken two years earlier, Ferry hasn’t actually achieved any real success as an NBA executive. After all, Ferry resigned from the same position with the Atlanta Hawks in 2014 after he, for some reason, repeated several racist tropes while reading a scouting report aloud about an African-born player. The reading prompted now-former Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon Jr. to demand Ferry’s resignation for what he called a “racist slur.”Still not sure what happened? Here’s how it all went down, according to Sports Illustrated. Ferry, a former NBA player and well established NBA exec who had previously served in leading roles at two other league franchises, read a portion of a five-page scouting report about then-free agent Luol Deng during a conference call with Hawks owners at the time.Minnesota Timberwolves v Milwaukee BucksSource: Stacy Revere / GettyThe following is the part that got Ferry to ultimately resign:“He’s a good guy on the cover but he’s an African,” Ferry said while reading from the report.Those words were apparently not at all uncomfortable for Ferry to say, so he continued.“He’s a good guy overall, but he’s not perfect. He’s got some African in him. And I don’t say that in a bad way. … He has a store out front that’s beautiful and great, but he may be selling some counterfeit stuff behind you,” Ferry read. I’m canceling my season tickets if the hire Danny Ferry— Kenneth McCracken (@SpecialK15020) May 21, 2019 Atlanta Hawks , Danny Ferry , Luol Deng , NBA , Washington Wizards last_img read more

EPA science adviser allowed industry group to edit journal article

EPA science adviser allowed industry group to edit journal article

first_imgSmog envelops Salt Lake City. Ravell Call/The Deseret News/AP Tony Cox, Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee Email It’s a perfect storm. So many things have been changed all at once, and every one of them weakens the process, and collectively it just creates a tremendously weak process that borders on being a total sham. Chris Frey, North Carolina State University Read more… By Scott Waldman, E&E NewsDec. 10, 2018 , 9:55 AM Neither in effect nor in actual fact did they interfere with, shape, or direct my findings or the conduct of my research in any way. It’s highly unusual to give an industry group, or anyone who funds scientific work, a chance to influence the outcome of research, according to scientists.”Certainly his ties to industry and comfort with allowing them to influence the science is concerning given he is heading a process where we know there will be heavy industry pressure to influence it,” said Gretchen Goldman, research director for the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, which is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts.The arrangement is unusual in the scientific community because it stands to discredit a researcher’s work, even if the group that provided funding makes innocuous changes, other researchers said. In this case, the access that Cox gave to API doesn’t seem to have dramatically altered the conclusions of his study. Instead, a small change here and there could have made it a friendlier vehicle for the industry’s message, Goldman said.It “implies that the messaging matters,” she said. EPA science adviser allowed industry group to edit journal article Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Originally published by E&E News When the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) begins a major review of air pollution standards this week, a researcher who has received funding from an industry group opposed to the rules will be leading the agency’s panel.Tony Cox, who was named chairman of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee by former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, accepted funding from the American Petroleum Institute (API) to help finance his research into particulate matter pollution. He also allowed the Washington, D.C.-based lobbying group to proofread and copy edit his findings before they were published, according to his own acknowledgements. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Cox, who was nominated for his position by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, has been critical of EPA air pollution regulations and has said that research showing the connection between air pollution and serious human health consequences is overblown. He sent E&E News a study that happened to contain copy edits, which he said were made by reviewers. It’s unclear which changes were made by API, and Cox denies that the fossil fuel lobbying group offered meaningful edits.Cox is a statistician who is now tasked with overseeing the advisory committee’s review of particulate matter pollution standards. It’s supposed to make a key health determination that could affect millions of Americans: chiefly whether the level of air pollution they are breathing is hurting them.The Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee is meeting Wednesday and Thursday to review EPA’s science assessment for particulate matter. It’s part of the legal requirement under the Clean Air Act that EPA review scientific information related to the national ambient air quality standards for six pollutants. They are: particulate matter, ground-level ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, lead and sulfur dioxide.Cox states in his study that API provided input before it was published last year.”This paper benefited from close proof-reading and copy-editing suggestions from API, but these reviews and suggestions were provided for the author’s consideration without constraints that any of them be incorporated,” he wrote in the study, which was published in the journal Critical Reviews in Toxicology.API, which lobbies the government on behalf of fossil fuel companies, has a history of fighting regulations on air pollution, sometimes by pointing to the scientific conclusions of studies that it funded.Before Pruitt resigned amid a flurry of ethics investigations earlier this year, EPA replaced academic researchers on its science advisory boards with researchers supported by industry groups. Pruitt declared that scientists who received EPA grants had conflicts of interest, while those who are paid by polluting industries deserved a louder voice. That’s when he named Cox to lead the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee.Under acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler, EPA has gone even further to sideline scientists, particularly around air pollution. It recently disbanded a separate panel of scientists, who are supposed to review particulate matter pollution, and canceled plans for another panel that was to review ozone.Meanwhile, the Trump administration has remade the panel led by Cox. It now includes an academic and several state regulators who have downplayed the effects of air pollution.Cox’s 2017 study, which examines the causal relationship between air pollution and human health, was published in Critical Reviews in Toxicology. The journal has a reputation for publishing industry-funded work that’s sometimes used to argue against government regulations.Cox’s research questions previous studies that have connected serious human health problems to air pollution. It fits with the approach that Cox has taken when testifying to Congress: He emphasizes uncertainties, including in 2015, when he told lawmakers that health benefits of reducing ozone exposure were “unwarranted and exaggerated.” Cox denied that API influenced his work and said the organization did not suggest any substantive changes. The fossil fuel group offered “some minor copy editing suggestions on punctuation and my use of ‘relation’ vs. ‘relationship,'” Cox said.”Neither in effect nor in actual fact did they interfere with, shape, or direct my findings or the conduct of my research in any way,” Cox said in an email to E&E News. “My research was complete before I drafted the paper, and nothing of substance changed thereafter except in response to journal reviewer comments and my own re-reading for clarity. My research is and always have been my own, and I do not accept outside interference.”Cox has a history of attacking established research on the health risks of air pollution, using his own statistical model to crunch data associated with particulate matter, or PM2.5.In one study, he said there was “no evidence that reductions in PM2.5 concentrations cause reductions in mortality rates.” In addition to API, he has received funding from the American Chemistry Council and Philip Morris International Inc., the tobacco company.There’s a large body of science that connects serious health ailments to air pollution. Ozone and fine particle air pollution are particularly dangerous to vulnerable groups of people, including children, the elderly, people with asthma and outdoor workers.The World Health Organization published research earlier this year that found nine out of 10 people globally breathe polluted air and that air pollution kills 7 million people annually. It’s one of the leading causes of death. Vehicle emissions are a leading cause of air pollution worldwide.John Bachmann, EPA’s director for science policy on air quality during President George W. Bush’s administration, said it’s “crazy” that EPA is barring researchers who received agency grants from sitting on advisory panels. They are often some of the best researchers, he said.That change means the panel overseen by Cox is reviewing air pollution standards without the help of a single epidemiologist. Altogether, the altered panels once included at least seven epidemiologists; they’re all gone, Bachmann said.He added that current members of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee are qualified, but their capabilities, expertise and perspectives are greatly limited compared with those who once served on a specialized panel to review particulate matter. Pruitt disbanded it.”It’s a huge loss to claim you can review a document that has hundreds and hundreds of pages on epidemiology by people who don’t do it, don’t do the research in it and the one guy who has done some of it has a point of view that is not mainstream,” Bachmann said, referring to Cox.Cox’s 2017 study is a “review paper that focuses on epidemiological literature and application of epidemiological methods to case studies by someone who is not an epidemiologist,” said Christopher Frey, a former chairman of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee and a professor of environmental engineering at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.In the past, it was rare to appoint a chair who had not previously served on the panel, Frey said. The Clean Air Act requires reviews by the advisory panel to be thorough and to rely on the latest science. He said industry researchers, going back to tobacco industry efforts to discredit the health effects of smoking, are largely focused on uncertainty rather than the risks. Frey said EPA, when it funded some of his research, did not seek to edit his work beforehand.”In a regulatory purpose, you really want all the members of the committee to be perceived as impartial and free of conflict of interest, and I don’t think as a group this committee earns that perception.”Frey, who served as chairman of the committee from 2012 to 2015 and was first appointed in 2008 under Bush, said the current board is derived of stakeholders with a vested interest.The panel lost prominence in other ways too. In the past, there were dozens of people reviewing air pollution research for three years. Now, it’s seven people doing the review in one year.”It’s a perfect storm,” Frey said. “So many things have been changed all at once, and every one of them weakens the process, and collectively it just creates a tremendously weak process that borders on being a total sham.”Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

BREAKING NEWS Notre Dame on fire in Paris

BREAKING NEWS Notre Dame on fire in Paris

first_imgShareTweetSharePinNotre Dame Cathedral in Paris before the blazeThe 850 year old Notre Dame Cathedral is on fire.Reports have been circulating on social media including video of the historically iconic building going up in flames.Reports are still unclear but the blaze may have to do with recent renovation works according to the BBC.Efforts are currently underway to combat the blaze as an area surrounding the building has been cleared. Read BBC story Video of the fire posted via twitterLe feu a Notre Dame pic.twitter.com/kDvV0A4Yoq— Eric Coursin (@ecoursin) April 15, 2019last_img