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So Much Swag! Broadway.com Launches Online Merch Store

So Much Swag! Broadway.com Launches Online Merch Store

first_img View Comments Ever wanted to rock a Broadway.com T-shirt or drink out of a Broadway.com water bottle during rehearsal, at the stage door, while you’re out and about or when you’re at home watching Mandy Gonzalez sing “Waving Through a Window” on repeat? Well, now you can.That’s right, Broadway.com fans. We’ve launched an online merch store so that you can show your pride (and delightful theater dorkdom) for the number one source for theater fans. Quantities are limited, but mugs, water bottles, tote bags, baseball caps and T-shirts are currently available for purchase.We can’t wait to see you show off your Broadway.com merch on social media, at next year’s BroadwayCon or even at the theater. See you soon!last_img

Porter Park work nearing completion in Prairie Village; nature play area one of the improvements

Porter Park work nearing completion in Prairie Village; nature play area one of the improvements

first_imgPorter Park will include a “nature play area” similar to this one at Bennett Park when an improvement project is completed.An overhaul of Porter Park that includes extending its trail along Roe Avenue, improving drainage at the ballpark and installing a “nature play” area is expected to be completed by mid-September.Melissa Prenger, project manager for the Prairie Village Public Works Department, said the drainage and trail components are well under way, and work is beginning on the nature play feature.The nature play area allows children to scramble on natural objects including tree stumps, thick branches laid out like balancing beams and a sand pit. Similar installations are at Taliaferro, Bennett and Franklin Parks.“It gives kids a different feel and play value than traditional playground equipment,” Prenger said.As part of the nature play area, the rubber mulch beneath some of the park’s traditional playground equipment is being replaced with wood mulch to better blend with the nature play area.The mulch beneath this playground equipment at Porter Park is being replaced as part of an improvement project.last_img read more

17th JNC to fill a Broward opening

17th JNC to fill a Broward opening

first_img August 15, 2013 Regular News 17th JNC to fill a Broward opening 17th JNC to fill a Broward opening The 17th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications to fill a Broward County vacancy created by the elevation of Judge Stacy Ross to the circuit bench.Applicants must have been a member of the Bar for the preceding five years, registered voters, and residents of the 17th Circuit.Applications are available on the Bar’s website at www.floridabar.org. An original and nine copies of the completed application, including a photograph, must be delivered to Fred Karlinsky, JNC Chair, Colodny, Fass, Talenfeld, Karlinsky, Abate & Webb, One Financial Plaza, 23rd Floor, 100 Southeast Third Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale 33394, phone: (954) 492-4010, no later than 5 p.m., September 5.last_img read more

Jeff Keck returns to Adolfson & Peterson as regional VP

Jeff Keck returns to Adolfson & Peterson as regional VP

first_imgAdolfson & Peterson Construction (A&P) announced Thursday morning the return of Jeff Keck to the organization. Keck had previously been a vice president with A&P for 12 years before leaving the company in early 2013. Effective this week, he will return and assume the new position of Vice President of Operations for the Arizona region.As regional vice president of operations, Keck will serve in the leadership role responsible for all staff and operations for A&P’s Arizona office. Over the course of his 30 year career, he has held a variety of positions in the industry and brings an abundance of local construction experience. Keck holds a degree in Civil Engineering and Construction from Purdue University and is involved in a number of local trade organizations.“Keck was a key contributor to A&P’s success in the Arizona market and his return to the company marks a change in local leadership while maintaining a commitment to the markets the firm serves locally,” says a company spokesman.“I’m very excited to be back at A&P,” states Keck.  “I look forward to working hand in hand with all of our past, current and future clients.”last_img read more

Study: Obesity not a risk factor for medically attended flu

Study: Obesity not a risk factor for medically attended flu

first_imgMay 22, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – A new study suggests that obesity does not increase a person’s risk of getting sick with influenza—a finding that may come as a surprise to those who are familiar with findings about obesity as a risk factor during the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic.Studies during the pandemic showed that those who caught the virus had a higher risk of severe illness if they were very obese. Those findings prompted some to wonder if obesity is a risk factor for contracting flu in the first place. The new study suggests the answer is no.The researchers, from two clinics in Wisconsin and Minnesota and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, studied adults who sought care for respiratory illnesses during two flu seasons and the 2009 pandemic. They found that patients who tested positive for flu were no more likely to be obese than patients who tested negative.”Our study demonstrates for the first time that among community-dwelling adults seeking outpatient medical care for an acute respiratory illness, obesity is not a risk factor laboratory-confirmed influenza,” says the report, published May 14 in Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses. The first and senior authors are Laura A. Coleman, PhD, and Edward A. Belongia, MD, of the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Marshfield, Wis.Obesity tied to immune defectsThe authors comment that obesity has been linked to various human immune defects, including reduced responses to tetanus, hepatitis B, and 2009 H1N1 vaccines. In addition, some studies have shown that obese mice are more likely to die of flu.In the 2009 pandemic, various studies linked severe obesity to an increased risk of complications and death in flu patients. For example, a study focusing on the first 16 weeks of the pandemic in California showed that extremely obese patients were three times as likely to die of the infection as normal-weight patients were.The authors of the recent study prospectively studied community-living adults (age 20 and up) who visited the Marshfield Clinic for treatment of respiratory illness during the 2007-08 and 2008-09 flu seasons and the 2009 pandemic (May to November of 2009). Those who had a fever, chills, or cough were enrolled and tested for flu.Obesity was defined by body mass index (BMI). Patients were classified as underweight (BMI less than 18.5), normal (BMI 18.5 to 24.9), overweight (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), obese (BMI of 30.0 to 39.9, or extremely obese (BMI 40 or over).A total of 2,623 patients were included in the analysis. Their mean BMI was 30.8, and average age was 45. By BMI category, 23% of patients were normal weight, 28% were overweight, 37% were obese, and 11% were extremely obese. Twenty-four percent of the patients had a high-risk medical condition. None of these variables differed significantly by study period.Of the 2,623 patients, 705 (26.9%) tested positive for flu. The number of flu cases was much higher in the 2007-08 season (454) than in the ensuing season (132) or the pandemic period (119).No difference in BMIIn their principal finding, the researchers determined that the mean BMI was nearly the same for flu case-patients (30.58 plus or minus a standard deviation of 7.31) and test-negative controls (30.93 plus or minus 7.55).Using logistic regression models, the authors found that obesity was not a predictor of flu in any of the seasons or in all three combined. The models included adjustments for gender, flu vaccination status, age, and presence of any high-risk condition.For example, compared with normal-weight patients, extremely obese patients had a 10% higher likelihood of contracting flu (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.10), but the wide 95% confidence interval (0.80 to 1.52) meant that the increase was not significant. In contrast to extremely obese patients, those classified as obese had a 5% lower risk of flu than normal-weight patients, but again the difference was not significant.The authors also ran a secondary analysis covering only the flu case-patients to see if obesity was associated with a serious outcome, meaning pneumonia or hospital admission within 30 days after illness onset. They found no link, but there were very few serious outcomes, which limited their ability to detect such an association.In contrasting their findings with the evidence that severe obesity increased the risk of complications in 2009 pandemic patients, the authors comment, “We suggest that the risk factors for severe complications of influenza-associated illnesses may be fundamentally different from those for less severe, non-hospitalized influenza.”They conclude that their findings need confirmation in a larger patient population in the interest of understanding the implications of obesity for flu prevention and treatment.Some reservationsLone Simonsen, PhD, an infectious-disease epidemiologist and research professor at George Washington University, praised the general design of the study but expressed some reservations.She said she wonders about the effect of controlling for high-risk medical conditions in the statistical model, commenting, “Surely obese patients are highly likely to have co-morbidities and so would be classified as ‘high risk’ mostly.” This could potentially bias the findings in unpredictable ways, she added.”What the authors perhaps could have included that would have been very helpful would be a ‘positive control,’ ” Simonsen said. “For example, we can all agree that diabetes is a risk factor of influenza; thus, a sub-analysis demonstrating that diabetes is a risk factor in this prospective cohort study would add confidence that the study design could identify a true risk factor.”She also said she was surprised that the study did not identify young age as a flu risk factor during the pandemic, compared with the previous two preceding flu seasons. (The report says the mean age for confirmed flu patients was 41 in the pandemic season, 41 in 2008-09, and 44 in 2007-08.) Other studies made clear that seniors had a low risk for the 2009 pandemic virus, she noted.Coleman LA, Waring SC, Irving SA, et al. Evaluation of obesity as an independent risk factor for medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza. Influenza Other Respi Viruses 2012; early online publication May 14 [Abstract]See also:Jan 5, 2011, CIDRAP News story “Study confirms extreme obesity as novel H1N1 risk factor”Aug 16, 2011, CIDRAP News story “Study reveals obesity link to seasonal flu hospitalizations”last_img read more

Probation service clocks up Reading’s largest letting since 2004

Probation service clocks up Reading’s largest letting since 2004

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Sauce of conflict

Sauce of conflict

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Larry Roesel To Retire From AutoZone

Larry Roesel To Retire From AutoZone

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement AutoZone Inc. has announced that Larry Roesel, senior vice president — commercial, customer satisfaction has made the decision to retire from AutoZone later this fall. Roesel joined AutoZone in 2007 and has been a key contributor in designing and building the commercial business at the company. Under Roesel’s leadership, AutoZone’s commercial business has grown from $700 million to $1.8 billion.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement“I would like to thank Larry for his many contributions to our organization over the past eight years,” said Bill Rhodes, chairman, president and CEO. “While we will certainly miss Larry and his contributions, he has developed strong leaders who are prepared to lead this organization to continued success well into the future. We wish Larry and his wife, Beverly, all the best in retirement.”“It’s been a fantastic experience over the past eight and a half years,” said Roesel. “AutoZone is truly a unique and incredible organization driven by our strong ‘Customers First’ culture, exceptional leadership and the dedication and passion our 80,000 AutoZoners demonstrate every day. I’m extremely proud of the results we’ve delivered and the progress we’ve made with our commercial business. I wish the team continued success for many years to come.”,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

Mammoet invests in Scheuerle SPMTs

Mammoet invests in Scheuerle SPMTs

first_imgThe purchase of 650 axle lines is the largest SPMT deal for both Mammoet and Scheuerle, who have been doing business together for the past 30 years.The transporters combine agility and manoeuvrability, allowing for precise positioning of heavy loads, and can be coupled together as required – either mechanically or arranged in a loose coupling mode on an area of up to 600 m x 600 m.”SPMTs are an important part of our fleet, and play a pivotal role in engineering solutions and safe delivery of our services – which are all about helping our customers improve construction efficiency and optimise the uptime of their plants and installations”, says Herman Smit, coo of Mammoet.As well as the acquisition of the SPMTs, Mammoet has invested in matching power pack units, featuring 140 kW electric engines and 147 kW diesel engines, which will increase the usability of the SPMT modules, says Mammoet.Mammoet expects the first delivery of SPMT modules from Scheuerle early in 2014, with the entire fleet expansion expected to be completed before the end of the second quarter. www.mammoet.com www.scheuerle.comlast_img read more

Government pledges to cut wedding red tape – as wait for divorce gets longer

Government pledges to cut wedding red tape – as wait for divorce gets longer

first_imgThe government has announced that it will make life easier for couples wanting to get married by freeing up more ‘dream venues’ – as separated couples face record waits to get divorced.Prime minister Theresa May and lord chancellor David Gauke have asked the Law Commission to review the laws on how and where wedding ceremonies can take place. The two-year project will explore how red tape can be removed to increase choice and lower costs. The government says the review, announced on Saturday, could open up opportunities for civil ceremonies at sea, in private homes or on military sites for service personnel.Plans to allow civil weddings and partnerships out of doors will be accelerated.May said: ‘As both home secretary and prime minister I have been proud to sponsor the legislation that created equal marriage, and to extend civil partnerships to ensure all couples are given the same choices in life.’The vital institution of marriage is a strong symbol of wider society’s desire to celebrate commitment between partners. But we can do more to bring the laws on marriage ceremonies up to date and to support couples in celebrating their commitment. This review will look at how we can ensure marriage keeps pace with modern Britain.’Gauke said ‘people from all walks of life should be able to express their vows in a way that is meaningful to them’.But while the government seeks to open up more wedding venues, waiting times at the 11 venues that process divorce applications have leaped up.Quarterly statistics published by the Ministry of Justice, covering January to March this year, show that the average time from petition to decree absolute is 59 weeks. The average time from petition to decree nisi is 33 weeks.The government’s response to a parliamentary written question from shadow justice secretary Richard Burgon MP about the average wait time at each divorce centre in 2015 and 2019 suggests that the increase is not a blip. Waiting times have risen across the country since the divorce centres were set up in 2015. The least affected region is the Midlands, where couples have to wait 3.6 weeks longer (24 weeks in 2015, 27.6 weeks now). The south-east is the worst hit, with couples waiting four months longer (24.7 weeks in 2015, 41 weeks now).Justice minister Paul Maynard said staff shortages at Bury St Edmunds had led to some delays in the south east, but the centre is now fully staffed and performance is improving. More judges have been recruited and sitting days have been increased.A question mark remains over the future of the centres.Maynard said: ‘Divorce can be a deeply distressing time which is why an online divorce application was introduced as part of the £1bn reform programme. Separating couples can fill in simplified forms, submit documents and pay online – leading to significantly fewer errors and an easier, cheaper application process.’last_img read more