Tag: 上海后花园

Adjunct Faculty – Health and Physical Education

Adjunct Faculty – Health and Physical Education

first_imgContemporary Health IssuesExercise ScienceFirst Aid, CPR, and Safety EducationHuman Sexuality and Family LifeNutrition SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION:Please indicate day, evening, and/or Saturday availability in yourapplication. Note that the rate of pay is determined by thecollective bargaining agreement.Please be aware that this is an adjunct pool position. Yourcompleted application will enable hiring officials to contact youat some point in the future if and when a hiring need arises for afuture semester. The History and Social Sciences department at Middlesex Collegeinvites applications for part-time Adjunct Faculty Members to teachthe following subjects during the 2021-2022 Academic Year:Health Courses (HED/HES) GolfRacquetballStep AerobicsSwimmingTennis Physical Education Courses (PED) MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: For HED and HES classes, a MA Degree in the subject or arelated disciplineFor PED classes, a BA Degree in the subject or a relateddisciplineExperience teaching adult learnersSubject matter expertise Experience teaching in a remote environmentFamiliarity with CanvasExperience teaching in higher education PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:last_img read more

LAPS Launches Los Alamos Safari Hunt For Kids

LAPS Launches Los Alamos Safari Hunt For Kids

first_imgIf you’re not scared of the wild, check it out! Visit the LA Safari Hunt blog for tips https://lasafarihunt.blogspot.com/Upload your photo to Instagram and tag it! #lasafarihunt @lasafarihunt Sylvester the Cat is spotted in the window of this Los Alamos home. Photo by Michele Altherr This stuffed lion is spotted in the window of a Los Alamos home. Photo by Allison WashburnLAPS News:It’s a Safari! The Los Alamos Safari Hunt for Kids! This activity is similar to a scavenger hunt.With a large portion of the world’s population now living under lockdown to contain the coronavirus, this type of Safari Hunt activity is popping up all over the world.The “hunters” try to spot as many stuffed animals as they can find in people’s windows and yards. Everyone can help by placing stuffed animals in their windows, which will make it fun for our children.If a window is not possible, placing one in a yard or on a fence will work, too!last_img read more

Olympic delay to cost IOC ‘several hundred million’ more

Olympic delay to cost IOC ‘several hundred million’ more

first_imgTOKYO (AP):THE INTERNATIONAL Olympic Committee (IOC) will face “several hundred million dollars” of added costs because of the postponement of the Tokyo Games, the body’s president said.Thomas Bach spoke in an interview with German newspaper Die Welt recently.Estimates in Japan put the overall cost of the postponement at between US$2 billion and US$6 billion. Except for the IOC portion, all added costs will be borne by the Japanese side, according to an agreement signed in 2013 when Tokyo was awarded the Olympics.Bach said it was “impossible to say for now” the extent of the added costs for the IOC caused by the coronavirus pandemic.“We agreed with the prime minister that Japan will continue to cover the costs it would have done under the terms of the existing agreement for 2020, and the IOC will continue to be responsible for its share of the costs,” Bach said. “For us, the IOC, it is already clear that we shall be faced with several hundred million dollars of additional costs.”Before the postponement, Japanese organisers put the official cost of the games at US$12.6 billion. However, a government audit report in 2019 said the costs were at least twice that. All but US$5.6 billion of it is in taxpayer money.Tokyo said the 2020 Games would cost about US$7.3 billion when it won the bid seven years ago.On Friday, the CEO of the Tokyo organising committee said the pandemic left some doubts about the Games going ahead next year.“I don’t think anyone would be able to say if it is going to be possible to get it under control by next July or not,” Toshiro Muto said, speaking through an interpreter. “We certainly are not in a position to give you a clear answer.”Bach was asked about the possibility of another postponement. He did not answer directly, but said later in the interview that Japanese organisers and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe “made it very clear to me that Japan could not manage a postponement beyond next summer at the latest”.last_img read more

Lane Kiffin makes return to Knoxville

Lane Kiffin makes return to Knoxville

first_imgKNOXVILLE — Alabama offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin looked cooler than a polar bear’s toenails walking into Neyland Stadium.With five to six police officers around him, the former Tennessee coach received a mix of cheers from Alabama fans and boos from Tennessee fans when the fourth-ranked Crimson Tide showed up two hours before today’s 6:30 p.m. game.As Kiffin walked into the stadium entrance, he shook hands with a man wearing Tennessee apparel and then put up two fingers as he reached the bottom of the hill.Kiffin left Tennessee after one season in 2009 to replace Pete Carroll at Southern Cal. Kiffin is from the West coast, was an assistant with the Trojans, but his abrupt exit left a bitter taste with the Tennessee fan base.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-18:fd199cf19893e898f63ad0c7 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-598779-3858883463001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.last_img read more

America’s oldest pro ballpark needs our help

America’s oldest pro ballpark needs our help

first_imgIn this June 24, 2015, file photo, Mo’ne Davis, of the Anderson Monarchs, gets ready to bat against the Willie Mays RBI Birmingham team at Rickwood Field, in Birmingham, Ala. The field is the oldest ballpark in America but it requires at least a half-million dollars in repairs to get it back in playing shape. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)An elderly friend needs our help.Birmingham’s Rickwood Field is the oldest professional ballpark in America _ yep, it’s been around even longer than Fenway Park and Wrigley Field _ but it’s really starting to show its age.A couple of months ago, city officials shut it down. Major structural repairs are needed, not surprising for a stadium that’s approaching its 107th birthday.It’s going to take money _ a lot of money _ to get the gates open again.That would be money well spent.Rickwood Field is a virtual time machine, an irreplaceable link to a bygone era when America’s pastime was the only game in town.Since its opening on Aug. 18, 1910, more than 100 Hall of Famers have swung a bat or thrown a ball at the corner of 2nd Avenue and 12th Street on the west side of Alabama’s largest city, everyone from Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb to Jackie Robinson and Hank Aaron.This was not only the longtime home of the Birmingham Barons, a minor-league team, but the Birmingham Black Barons of the Negro League, a powerhouse squad from the ugly era of Jim Crow that included Satchel Paige and Willie Mays among its alumni.“Rickwood filled a role as kind of the cultural center for both the Caucasian and the African-American communities in Birmingham,” said David Brewer, executive director of a nonprofit organization that manages the park, Friends of Rickwood. “That’s significant in terms of American social history.”The Black Barons ceased operations in 1960, and Rickwood’s days seemed numbered when the Barons left 27 years later for a shiny new stadium in the suburbs.I certainly didn’t expect it to last much longer when I visited for the first time in 1991 .The green paint was peeling. The roof was leaky and worn out. Weeds sprouted between the seats. There were two scoreboards _ one for baseball, the other for football games that were also played there _ but neither worked. Surely, I thought, this stately little park would soon go the way of Forbes Field and Shibe Park and the Polo Grounds.But, somehow, Rickwood survived.City officials managed to stave off the wrecking ball, with help from a determined group of volunteers tirelessly raising money to address an ever-evolving list of repairs. Before long, Rickwood was as busy as it had ever been, with colleges and high schools taking the field in the late winter and spring, followed by a full slate of various adult and youth league tournaments through the summer and into fall. In all, it was used about 175 days a year.The Barons even returned, albeit for only one game a season. They called it the Rickwood Classic, a true throwback game played in the daylight, complete with fans in period clothing, umpires wearing bow ties, the lineups written in chalk on a board beneath the stands, and two teams decked out in old-timey uniforms.“It’s important not to be America’s oldest empty ballpark,” Brewer said. “We view the playing of baseball here as essential to the continued success of the ballpark.”There was no Rickwood Classic this season. After the ballpark was shuttered on April 7, the Barons substituted a “Turn Back The Clock” game, which was held Wednesday at their latest home, 4-year-old Regions Field in downtown Birmingham.A nice gesture.But not the same.The Barons hope to return to Rickwood in 2018, but that’s going to take a major financial commitment.Mayor William Bell told al.com the city is willing to spend a half-million dollars on needed repairs, but quickly added that “any other help we get is appreciated.” The Friends of Rickwood have a donation link on their web site and also set up a GoFundMe account that hopes to raise $25,000.As of late Friday afternoon, just under $2,000 had been donated.“It’s a very challenging project,” Brewer said. “Communities are wrestling with what to do with these old parks. Is it worth doing it? Is the money available? These are tough questions. You have to make both a cultural and economic rationale for doing this.”Until its most recent setback, Rickwood served as a de facto museum for fans who wanted to see what the game like at the turn of the last century. The park was open at least five days a week to anyone who wanted to take a look around. Brewer said he’s welcomed visitors from all over this country, and other countries as well.“People say very nice things in the guest book, beyond things like, `Boy, the grass looks great’ and `This place sure looks clean.’ They say things like, `This place is amazing. We traveled across the country and it was worth every minute to get here,”’ he related. “That tells us this is a project worth doing.”So, if you’re an avid baseball fan, or someone who appreciates American history, or maybe you’re just miffed that we inexplicably tore down true landmarks such as Yankee Stadium and Comiskey Park, consider making a donation to save the oldest ballpark we’ve got left. It’s at least as worthy as spending billions on all these shiny new stadiums.I’ll leave the last word to Bob Veale, from the story I wrote 26 years ago when I ran into the former major league pitcher on my visit to Rickwood.“It’s still a part of this neighborhood,” he said, the words as relevant now as they were then. “It’s a part of America.”___Paul Newberry is a sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at pnewberry(at)ap.org or at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/paul%20newberry___For more AP baseball coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseballlast_img
Is Perfect the Enemy of Good Enough?

Is Perfect the Enemy of Good Enough?

first_imgThere is a dynamic tension in today’s workplace. With the rise of activist investors, the ubiquity of technology that spreads news instantly, and increasing public scrutiny of corporate actions, business leaders are more driven than ever to aim for perfection. And yet the speed of business also forces these leaders to make immediate decisions. So, while there is often a need to make an ideal choice, there is also a need to make a choice now, even if it isn’t perfect. What to do?This is the tension between maximizing and satisficing.Maximizing: Maximizing involves searching for the most optimal solution and continuing that search after making a choice, just in case even better options come along. It’s the ultimate “grass is always greener” mentality. Being perfect is often seen as a badge of honor, and many people are proud that they never settle for second-best. There are many industries where maximizing is ideal. My smart phone works and my car gets good mileage, but I wouldn’t mind an even better phone and a car that got even more miles per tank. Telecom and automotive industries, please continue maximizing!But there are other scenarios where maximizing is harmful. In medicine, letting a disease continue while waiting for the perfect cure may not be smart if there is an adequate treatment already available. When hiring for open positions, companies may not have time to wait for the perfect candidate because there are qualified people in the applicant pool and the job needs to be filled ASAP. Even in the industries I mentioned above, maximizing can be problematic. I still need a smart phone and car today – I may not want to wait for the next generation of technology. Striving for perfection is ideal, but not always possible.Satisficing: Satisficing is a term derived from the words “satisfy” and “suffice” [1] and it explains how people make choices when they cannot consider all possible options. People may lack information, or time, or the cognitive ability to consider all the options to make the perfect choice. Instead, they select an option that satisfies what they want and is sufficient to meet their needs. It’s not about settling for less; settling might not meet the person’s need and it would certainly be dissatisfying. Rather, satisficing is about recognizing that there may be several acceptable alternatives, and so long as you choose one of them, you’re good to go.You satisfice hundreds of times each day. For example, think about the decisions you make while buying orange juice at the grocery store. You can have it from concentrate or fresh squeezed, without pulp or with some pulp or lots of pulp, with vitamin D or calcium or neither or both, from oranges that are organic or not. A single store can have dozens of combinations of these different options, just for “simple” orange juice. And these options don’t even account for price, container size, whether you have manufacturers’ coupons, or if the store is running a sale. Without satisficing, you could spend hours contemplating the range of options and trying to pick the most optimal choice. But we can’t afford to be paralyzed by each decision that’s as complicated as buying orange juice.The solution, of course, is balance.Is Perfect the Enemy of Good Enough? This is a question I ask myself and my teams when faced with challenging dilemmas. There are certain moments where perfection is absolutely required. Sometimes, the product, decision, or action just has to be right. In those cases, it’s worth the time and energy to thoroughly consider all options, weigh the pros and cons, and make sure you reach the best conclusion. However, there are other times where good enough is exactly that: good enough. The trick is knowing your audience (supervisor, customer, shareholder, etc.) to balance the two.By asking this question, I’m certainly not advocating laziness or a laissez-faire approach. When the stakes are high or when there is enough time and information, I’ll always aim for perfection. Maximizing is a useful antidote to a pattern of satisficing that causes people and companies to rest on their laurels, avoid risks, or miss huge opportunities (remember Kodak?). But when the decision doesn’t have much impact on the final outcome, perfect may not matter. And when resources are limited, perfect may not be achievable. In those cases, maximizing can halt forward progress or blind people into making even worse decisions than they would otherwise.Satisficing is an antidote to maximizing because it drives people to meet their needs, but also gives them permission to prioritize other resources (time, energy) and accept less optimal choices when they can. In fact, satisficing also helps people live with the decision after it has been made. This is important because they can put decisions behind them and not use valuable time and cognitive energy second-guessing themselves. After all, we have better things to do than re-think which type of orange juice we bought last week.(References)Simon, H. A. (1956). Rational choice and the structure of the environment. Psychological Review, 63, 129–138.last_img read more

Execs Reveal Their Top Retail Security Solutions and Strategies

Execs Reveal Their Top Retail Security Solutions and Strategies

first_imgAnytime loss prevention pros implement a new operational procedure, new administrative process, or new piece of loss prevention technology, they are likely to consider how it’s going to affect LP spending. Indeed, in many cases, controlling costs may be a primary objective.Expectations and reality don’t always match, however. Sometimes, new retail security solutions or strategies cut costs far beyond what LP was thinking would happen. In other cases, cost savings disappoint. A national study by SDR/LPM looked at this expectation gap.In this post, we examine several strategies that retail respondents said had the most surprising upside.- Sponsor – The study asked LP executives about thirty different security department strategies that are often thought to reduce or help control costs, whether as an ancillary or primary benefit. The list looked at a wide range of retail security solutions and strategies, such as automating select security functions via web-based applications; use of video analytics; development of centralized security monitoring or control centers; outsourcing LP functions and, conversely, bringing them in house.For each strategy, the survey asked LP executives if they had implemented it and, if so, how effective it was at controlling or reducing departmental costs.LP pros who had implemented the strategy in question rated it on a 1-to-5 scale. A score of 1 indicated that the measure or activity substantially failed to meet expectations for cost control; a 5 rating indicated that the measure or activity substantially exceeded expectations for cost control. A score of 3 indicated that the realized cost savings was what LP execs had expected.LP executives rated each of the 30 measures solely on its performance in the area of containing or reducing costs and not on other performance criteria.ResultsPerhaps because the ability of security technology to reduce costs is frequently described, projects such as IP video surveillance, video analytics, and online background checks were not identified as providing the biggest cost-cutting surprise. These and similar technology solutions largely scored in the 3.2 to 3.5 range. They did better than expected at cost-control, but modestly so.So what had the most surprising upside?Using remote computer capabilities, such as for online training and remote investigations, provided LP the most pleasant surprise, according to the survey. The strategy rated 3.89 on the 1-to-5 scale.Retail respondents were among the security professionals most pleased with a move from LP training by live instructors to training conducted online or via software. They were also happier than counterparts in other industries with using online capabilities to reduce travel expenses associated with investigations.The distribution loss prevention manager for an Ohio retail company said that his strategy to cut costs in recent years has been simple. “More [remote] interviews.” Telephone and online video interviews have saved the company millions in recent years by reducing travel costs and increasing investigators’ productivity.Although it’s an attractive solution, particularly for cases involving suspected dishonest employees, it should not be viewed as the preferred means of interviewing subjects, warn some experts. Remote interviews can miss suspects’ nonverbal cues. Face-to-face meetings are a better format for squeezing out the truth from dishonest employees and resolving integrity issues.As such, remote interviewing is more appropriate for theft and loss investigations and should be avoided when possible in threat or harassment cases, according to Gavin Appleby, employment law attorney, trainer, and author. He thinks companies should avoid them in harassment cases because they are “far less effective than those conducted in person.” In-person interviews are also beneficial in the event that case one day lands the company in a courtroom, he said.So, while companies may be keen to use online video interviews to shave costs, the corporate LP department needs a protocol that identifies when it is the preferred means for conducting investigative interviews.Here are two other strategies that proved surprisingly beneficial to LP:Transferring responsibility. Because the hourly wage of LP staff has climbed significantly in recent years, the gap has closed between the wage of line security staff and other line workers. So while using security personnel to fill other duties has been a viable solution for reducing costs in years past, it is possible that it now makes better fiscal sense to use general staff to perform LP functions. The tipping point is unique to each organization, so LP departments may want to recalculate their assumptions in this regard now that the average LP officer has become more expensive.Many retailers know that by enhancing training and motivating loss prevention staff, they can reduce cash losses, deter thieves, and boost profits in high-loss stores. But deploying officers on a resource-to-risk basis is less attractive as security salaries climb. One LP director said he thinks store managers today are often correct when they say that doing without the considerable—and escalating—cost of guard contracts makes better sense. A retailer may find that providing stores with technology, leadership, training, and some additional staffing hours is more economical. This can arm store associates with the knowledge they need to reduce waste levels, deter crime by effectively interacting with customers, and reduce stock loss by ensuring the accuracy of deliveries.In terms of effectiveness, re-assigning select store security functions to other departments was rated 3.75, indicating that the strategy has provides LP with a surprising financial upside. It’s a strategy that only 20 percent of responding LP departments had undertaken, according to the study.Re-negotiating. Re-negotiating or re-bidding LP equipment maintenance contracts is a strategy that three-quarters of LP executives said they’ve tried. It’s cost-control rating, 3.82, indicates that the strategy was substantially more successful in saving money than LP execs thought it would be when going into negotiations.To negotiate maintenance contracts effectively, a strict accounting should be maintained of all vendor maintenance visits. Every time a vendor comes for a repair, there should be a record of what they did, how long it took, how many staff they needed to do the job, and other details about the visit. By analyzing these logs before yearly maintenance negotiations, companies can then make the business choice that makes the most sense, such as going with “hourly,” or self-insuring some components, or assuming the risk of preventative maintenance. Having detailed data of past maintenance lets companies make more cost-effective decisions regarding features of future maintenance agreements.Many experts believe that the best time to negotiate long-term maintenance is before the purchase of equipment, when companies are vying for your business. At this time, retailers may be able to demand a longer warranty that doesn’t start until the date of acceptance and includes all software upgrades, fixes, and new versions.Finally, because respondents indicated that equipment maintenance is an area of excessive costs, an acceptance test plan—that examines a system’s capabilities against exactly what a store needs it to do—may also save retailers money. The burden is on the purchaser of retail security solutions to identify how it intends to use the system and arrange a factory acceptance test of the system to see whether it meets their needs.This post was originally published in 2017 and was updated June 19, 2018.  Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Virat Kohli ready to learn from mistakes in South Africa

Virat Kohli ready to learn from mistakes in South Africa

first_imgVirat Kohli said he accepts failures as a part of a sportsman’s career and believes in learning from them and moving on ahead of India’s third and final Test against South Africa, starting Wednesday.Kohli has been heavily criticised for his team selections and on field tactical decisions as India lost the three-match Test series 2-0 to South Africa.Kohli, however, took it as a learning process and said he would rather concentrate on working on the positives to sustain in the sport.WATCH”Every day is learning. If I did not learn from the early days of my career, I would not be here. So, it is always an ongoing process of learning everyday from your mistakes, correcting those mistakes and moving forward.”You need to be able to still work on your positives to be a consistent international player over a period of time. I have never stopped learning. I will never stop learning,” Kohli told media ahead of the Johannesburg Test on Tuesday.He added, “It is all about hanging in there and accepting all the faces that are coming. Sometimes team is playing so beautiful that you do not need to do anything. You just relax. This is a part of it.”I have gone through bad times personally in my career. Ups and downs are a part of a sportsman’s career and I understand that. You learn everyday and move forward.”The 29-year old quipped that though cricket is a team game every individual’s responsibility to realise his mistakes and rectify them.advertisementHe informed that every individual has had a discussion with batting coach Sanjay Bangar before they take South Africa in the “dead-rubber” Test at the Wanderers in Johannesburg from Wednesday.Recalling the 2013 Test match against South Africa at the Wanderers where Kohli scored 119 and 96 in the drawn first Test, he said, “I always love playing at the stadium. It is a great vibe. I feel good when I walk into this ground. The last time’s Test match was very special, and hopefully, we can have as exciting cricket as we played the last time here.”(Courtesy: ANI)last_img read more

Manulife sees nearly 2 per cent bump in first quarter net income

Manulife sees nearly 2 per cent bump in first quarter net income

first_imgTORONTO – Manulife Financial Corp. says its net income attributed to shareholders increased 1.63 per cent in its first quarter of the 2018 financial year.Manulife says its income was $1.372 billion or 67 cents per share in the quarter compared to $1.35 billion or 66 cents per share in the same quarter the previous year.The company says the increase comes partly from growth in core earnings thanks to lower U.S. tax rates and strong growth in Asia and Global Wealth Asset Management, among other things.Its core earnings were $1.303 billion for the quarter or 64 cents per share, compared to $1.101 billion or 53 cents per share in the same quarter the previous year.CEO Roy Gori says in a statement that the company has made significant strides in transforming the business to be more customer centric and is encouraged by its early progress.The company also announced a quarterly divided of 22 cents per common share.last_img read more

Saputo misses expectations as Q2 profit falls despite higher revenues

Saputo misses expectations as Q2 profit falls despite higher revenues

first_imgSaputo Inc. reported a lower profit in a challenge-filled quarter, the company’s CEO said, sending the company’s shares falling.The Montreal-based company’s net income fell $22.1 million or 11.9 per cent to $163.1 million for the second quarter ending Sept. 30, 2018. That amounts to 42 cents per share compared to 48 cents per share for the same quarter the previous year.Analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters Eikon expected a net profit of about $178.6 million or 44 cents per share.The company’s shares fell $1.38 or 3.44 per cent to $38.73 in afternoon trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The earnings “reflect the challenges we anticipated,” said Lino Saputo, chief executive officer, during a conference call with analysts Thursday.Saputo faced depressed dairy markets, increased warehousing and logistical costs, increased competition and other challenges during the quarter ending Sept. 30, 2018, he said.The company focused on initiatives to mitigate these factors, like gearing up efforts to integrate its recent acquisitions, Saputo said, highlighting the benefits of Shepherd Gourmet, which it acquired in mid-June, and Motchevere, which it acquired in late 2017.Saputo’s revenue increased mostly due to the contributions of recent acquisitions, rising about $536 million or 18.6 per cent to $3.42 billion in the quarter.The company recently announced an agreement to acquire the activities of F&A Dairy Products Inc., a manufacturer of natural cheeses, earlier this month and expects the transaction to close by the end of this year.Saputo said the manufacturer will continue to make acquisitions and act as a consolidator in the dairy market, pointing to several unnamed acquisition targets that he said would get the company into a new geographical area or give it a new platform somewhere it already operates.“We’re extremely excited about the fact that the pipeline remains full,” he said.Saputo also expressed surprise at some aspects of the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada-Agreement announced about a month ago. The deal will grant an expanded 3.6 per cent market access to the domestic dairy market and eliminate two milk price classes, including the controversial Class 7.Saputo expected the Class 7 elimination, but was surprised to see the amount of access Canada has granted the U.S. into its market through the USMCA and other trade agreements.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX: SAP)last_img read more