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ABS Chat Broncos Rookie Star Bradley Roby Says College

ABS Chat Broncos Rookie Star Bradley Roby Says College

Bradley Roby, the Denver Broncos’ No. 1 draft pick from Ohio State, entered the NFL as a rookie intent on not playing like a rookie. Nine games into the season, he’s accomplishing the mission.The Atlanta-area native earned a starting defensive back assignment in training camp and has justified the position with the kind of play that makes the Broncos believe they have a future star. He has two interceptions, 40 tackles and a forced fumble so far—and is in the running for the AFC’s Defensive Rookie of the Year Award.Roby, 22, spoke with Atlanta Black Star about the surprises of the NFL, playing on a team with Super Bowl-only ambitions, practicing against Peyton Manning and how college is “easier” than the NFL, among other subjects.Atlanta Black Star: How do you compare what you thought the NFL was compared to the reality of being there?Bradley Roby: At times it’s amazing that I’m here. At times, I feel like the NFL is not this imaginary place that you cannot get to. But I’m here and it’s an accomplished feeling to be a part of a great organization with great players and coaches. It’s like a dream, but it’s also a reality that I have a job to do and I have to put in the work to prove myself and to not let the team down.ABS: What was the moment that helped you feel like you belonged?Roby: The first game against the (Indianapolis) Colts, when I broke up the last play of the game (to preserve the win), Andrew Luck throwing to Reggie Wayne, who is a great veteran player. That was my biggest moment of the season for me so far. It was a great way to start my career, to gain confidence and to make a mark. Great defensive backs like Deion Sanders made a mark in their first game—he returned a punt for a kickoff. That was my moment. . . so far.ABS: How does a rookie come into the league and understand the value of staying ready when the NFL is such a leap from college?Roby: In the end, it’s just football. But as a pro, it’s my job to be ready. I have the honor to practice everyday against Peyton Manning, one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. Going against him and our receivers, who are amazing, everyday keeps you sharp. If not, you’ll get beat easily. It’s amazing how good Peyton Manning is. I watched him growing up. To be on the other side of the ball against him. . . it’s just remarkable. I feel I’m past the rookie stage. I’m not worried about the playbook, I know how to get ready. I’m used to the life, which isn’t all that exciting because the job consumes my time. . . I look in our defensive huddle and across from me I’ll see a great player like DeMarcus Ware. He’s looking at me to do my job. I’m really playing with great players that I don’t want to let down.ABS: What has surprised you about the NFL?Roby: College is actually harder. . . from the standpoint of there being so many other things you have to do. In the NFL, it’s easier because it’s my job. I never felt like a rookie; I just felt like it was a new adventure. From 7.a.m. to 4 (p.m.), I’m at practice, getting treatments, in film sessions. It’s a job and my world revolves around it. There’s more time for me get massages, see the chiropractor, hit the ice tub to keep my body right, watch videos of opponents at home. At Ohio State, you had classes, you have meetings and you have practice everyday. In the NFL, we’re in pads at practice once a week, and it’s not real contact. At Ohio State, there was way more contact in practice. So, my body probably feels a little better now than it did during college. Now, playing games is not easier. I’m athletic, but everyone in the NFL is athletic, so you can’t rely on that to get you by. You have to know the system, work on technique and be focused every play. Every practice is like a game. And you better have your ‘A’ game every play, so it’s intense.ABS: You mentioned the Colts play to preserve the win, but you also got an interception against Tom Brady in the loss to New England and one last week, too, in Oakland.Roby: We got beat in New England, which is all that matters. It’s about winning for us. The interception against Tom Brady for me was my first in the NFL, making it extra special. My first pick against one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. I’ll remember that. But the game is about winning and making plays.ABS: Is this a championship year or bust for the Broncos?Roby: No doubt. We’re not going to be the same team next year. This is the only time this caliber of men will be together. We have great talent, great coaches, great fans. Why not? But we have to earn it. Losing to New England taught us something. It doesn’t do you good to win all your games. You learn from losing, and we learned, above all, that the path won’t be easy. We have to take it if we want it, and we want it. So it will be exciting to see how the rest of the season plays out. But we’re going for it. read more

Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher sentenced for taking photo with a dead ISIS

Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher sentenced for taking photo with a dead ISIS

first_img July 3, 2019 Updated: 4:00 PM Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News Tags: Eddie Gallagher FacebookTwitter SAN DIEGO (AP) — A decorated Navy SEAL acquitted of murder in the killing of a wounded Islamic State captive in Iraq but convicted for posing with the corpse was sentenced by a military jury Wednesday after the Bronze Star recipient acknowledged making ethical and moral mistakes.Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher was sentenced by a military jury to a reduction in rank and four months of confinement.A judge, however, credited the 40-year-old Gallagher with enough time already spent in custody to ensure he won’t be locked up.Gallagher turned to his wife, shook his head and pretended to unpin his “anchors” — the insignia of a chief — and fling them across the courtroom. He then smiled and hugged her.The sentence will not go into effect until it is approved by the commanding officer overseeing the court-martial.Gallagher’s lawyers said they plan to appeal the punishment that will affect his pension and benefits just as the 19-year veteran plans to retire from the service.Earlier, Gallagher addressed the jury that acquitted him Tuesday of premeditated murder in the death of the captive and attempted murder and other charges in the shootings of civilians during a 2017 deployment to Iraq. He also was cleared on charges of impeding the investigation and retaliating against the SEALs who reported him.The platoon chief told the jury he was fully responsible for his actions on the day he took photos with the body of the 17-year-old militant.“I put a black eye on the two communities that I love — the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy — specifically the SEAL community,” Gallagher said.He said he tried to lead by example but didn’t always succeed.“I’ve made mistakes throughout my 20-year career — tactical, ethical, moral — I’m not perfect but I’ve always bounced back from my mistakes. I’m ready to bounce back from this,” he said.The jury called for reducing Gallagher’s rank by one grade to petty officer 1st class and ordered his monthly pay cut by $2,697 for four months.But the judge capped the pay cut at two months and gave Gallagher 60 days’ credit for being held in overly harsh conditions before being tried and being briefly deprived of treatment for a traumatic brain injury.Gallagher also got credit for 201 days of pretrial confinement.A Navy prosecutor had asked only for a reduction in rank, not confinement. The defense recommended no punishment.The prosecutor, Lt. Brian John, said Gallagher was the platoon chief and should not have been the centerpiece of the photos in which nearly all the members posed with the body. John said Gallagher should have stopped the photos from being taken.“For that reason, he no longer deserves to wear anchors,” the prosecutor said.John also said the photos had the potential to be used as propaganda by Islamic State and be harmful to U.S. forces overseas.The photos were taken after Gallagher and other SEAL medics provided treatment for the captive who was wounded in an airstrike in 2017 and handed over by Iraqi forces.One image shows him clutching the hair of the corpse with one hand and holding a knife in another. Prosecutors used the images and text messages that included “got him with my hunting knife” to build a murder case against Gallagher.Gallagher could have faced life in prison if convicted of murder. The verdict was met with tears and hugs.President Donald Trump, who intervened earlier this year to have Gallagher moved from the brig to less restrictive confinement, tweeted congratulations to the SEAL and his family.“You have been through much together. Glad I could help!” the president wrote.The outcome delivered a major blow to one of the Navy’s most high-profile war crimes cases and exposed a generational conflict within the ranks of the elite special operations forces.Asked in an interview Wednesday on Fox & Friends what his message might be to future Navy SEALs, Gallagher said he would tell them that “loyalty is a trait that seems to be lost. … You’re there to watch your brother’s back, and he’s there to watch your back.”Speaking of his accusers, Gallagher said, “this small group of SEALs that decided to concoct this story in no way, shape or form represent the community that I love.”Seven SEALs from his platoon testified that Gallagher unexpectedly stabbed the war prisoner in the neck, and later posed with the body in photos. The defense said Gallagher was framed by junior SEALs who fabricated the allegations to oust a chief who was tough on them.They said no corpse was found and there was no physical evidence to support the allegations.The defense said the text and photos were gallows humor and pointed out that almost all platoon members who testified against him also posed with the corpse.The jury of five Marines and two sailors, including a SEAL, was comprised mostly of seasoned combat veterans who served in Iraq. Several lost friends in war.___Antczak and AP writer Brian Melley contributed to this report from Los Angeles. KUSI Newsroom Posted: July 3, 2019 BREAKING: Gallagher is sentenced to four months confinement, moot because of time served. His rank is reduced to E-6, Petty Officer First Class. Gallagher also forfeits more than $2600 a month for two months. Gallagher’s defense lawyers speak after sentencing. KUSI Newsroom, Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher sentenced for taking photo with a dead ISIS terroristlast_img read more

Cyber Insurance The Next Big Thing for Businesses

Cyber Insurance The Next Big Thing for Businesses

first_imgJuly 6, 2014 Image credit: ShutterstockEarlier this year, New York City-based staffing agency Clarity bought cyber insurance for the first time. This spring it added more coverage.”We were actually hearing about it from our clients,” said Elizabeth Wade, Clarity’s operations manager. “They were asking us about it and in order to prevent being behind the eight ball we felt like we really wanted to be proactive and get the insurance ’cause we knew it was something that was important to our clients, and then it was important to us as well.”With a staff of 30, Clarity was looking to protect the information it takes from the clients it places, like their Social Security numbers and dates of birth. The initial coverage it bought from insurer CNA covered any legal costs and the costs of lost business that would come with a breach. This spring it added coverage for credit monitoring if its client data are hacked.Clarity is one of a growing number of small businesses buying cyber insurance, and one of the reasons sales of this product are skyrocketing.Read More: Astros furious after hackingRobert Parisi, network security and privacy practice leader for insurance broker Marsh USA, a unit of Marsh & McLennan, told CNBC that on the heels of a 21 percent increase in Marsh’s cyber insurance sales in 2013, sales for the first half of 2014 are double what they were for the same time last year. “The number of (data) breaches in 2013 certainly was the last straw in the camel’s back,” Parisi said, referring to well-publicized breaches like the one involving more than 110 million Target clients last winter. “A lot of people who were sitting on the sidelines. it got them buying.”At an estimated $1 billion to $2 billion, 2013 sales of cyber insurance were a fraction of the $1.1 trillion in total U.S. insurance premiums last year. But Parisi sees the number growing exponentially in the foreseeable future. “The growth trajectory, I see no sign of it abating,” Parisi said. “Cyber insurance is underpenetrated in the economy in general and we’re at the long end of the hockey stick heading upward.”A 2014 study, “Net Losses: Estimating the Global Cost of Cybercrime,” conducted by software security firm McAfee for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, estimated that cybercrime costs the global economy $445 billion a year. The report also forecast the cost will rise as more consumers and businesses connect to the Internet, creating in turn a larger potential market for cyber insurance.Read More: Russia linked to energy cyberattack”Just about every business today needs cyber insurance,” said Bob Hartwig, president of the Insurance Information Institute. “More and more businesses are transacting online and the reality is it’s only going to increase as we move forward.”Introduced more than a decade ago, cyber insurance’s growth has been spurred not only by an increase in cybercrime, but also by new regulations.Most states now require companies to notify customers if there is a data breach. Cybercrime is also a growing concern in the boardrooms of publicly traded companies.In response to public data breaches like those at Facebook in 2013 and the restaurant chain P.F. Chang’s in 2014, directors and upper-level executives are increasingly focused on boosting companies’ defenses and making sure their firms are ready to act in the event it happens to them. Parisi said that anytime a problem reaches that level of attention, companies are going to act. Read More: Facebook fights NYC on shielding customer dataPresident Barack Obama also shone a spotlight on the problem.In 2013 he highlighted cybercrime as a serious threat to the economy, and issued an executive order that resulted in the Cybersecurity Framework. Developed by private companies and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the framework gives companies a guideline on how to respond and handle cybercrimes.In the U.S., the recent growth in cyber-insurance premiums has been fueled by two sets of customers: new clients and existing clients who are buying additional coverage”The trend early on was tech, financial and health-care companies buying insurance. That still continues” said Tim Francis, who heads insurer Travelers’ cyber division. “In the last couple of years you’ve seen more retail and manufacturing firms buying insurance and now you are seeing small- and middle-market firms buying too.”While many of the headlines about cybercrime tend to be about attacks at large firms, The Ponemon Institute’s “2014 Cost of Data Breach Study: United States” found a company with less than 10,000 records is more likely to be hacked than a firm with more than 100,000 records, in part because smaller firms are less likely to have robust defenses against hackers, who Marsh’s Parisi said are not discriminating in what they attack. “Hackers and cybercriminals are very opportunistic,” Parisi said. “If they can get 100 records or credit cards from the local dry cleaners they’ll do it.”Read More: Cybersecurity firm says large hedge fund attackedCyber insurance policies will depend on a company’s size and the industry in which it operates, how much data it has and what a company already does to secure it.Among the expenses a policy might cover: the cost of conducting an investigation into a breach, notifying customers, reputational and crisis management, lost business and the cost of credit monitoring. Like the policies, the price of the coverage varies, too, though Francis said prices are coming down as more insurers enter a market served by the likes of Travelers, AIG, Chubb, ACE Limited and CNA. The increased competition is making cyber insurance more affordable for many smaller firms, which can buy policies tailored to their risk profile, which is increasingly important for small- to mid-sized firms.Not having cyber insurance could prove costly for businesses.The Ponemon study found the average cost of a data breach to an organization in 2013 rose to $5.9 million from $5.4 million in 2012. The study looked at firms where the information of more than 500 clients had been compromised.Behind the rising cost, there was an increase in the number of customers the firms surveyed lost after a breach. It’s no surprise then, that lost business accounts for highest portion of the costs linked to a data breach, coming in at 38 percent, followed by legal services at 16 percent and investigations and forensics at 13 percent.The study found the cost of a breach can be reduced if a firm already had a strong security profile and an incident response plan in place. It also found companies that notify customers too quickly—before doing a thorough assessment or forensic examination—risked increasing their costs.For Clarity, the risk of not having cyber insurance outweighed the cost, which Wade said was “a couple of thousands of dollars” or roughly 5 percent of its total insurance costs. “It’s never one of those things you want to find out if it’s worth having or not,” Wade said. “But it certainly helps us to rest easy at night and focus on our business, knowing that we have it.” 7 min read This story originally appeared on CNBC Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more