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Watch Bob Weir Sit In With Jackie Greene On ‘Sugaree’

Watch Bob Weir Sit In With Jackie Greene On ‘Sugaree’

first_imgAs Bob Weir continues to return to performing publicly, we were delighted to hear that the Grateful Dead guitarist made an appearance at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, CA last night, coming out towards the end of Jackie Greene’s first set for a Dead cover.The show was the final night in Jackie Greene’s residency at the venue, and Greene was joined by RatDog member Mark Karan for the second set. Weir came out towards the end of the first set, accompanying the group on the classic tune “Sugaree.”Watch the two-part video, captured by Deadheadland: And here’s the full setlist, also courtesy of Deadheadland:First Set (8:35 – 9:21) I Don’t Live In A Dream I’m So Gone Spooky Tina Now I Can See For Miles Uphill Mountain Silver Lining Sugaree # Second Set (9:44 – 10:26) Shaken * So Hard To Find My Way * Tell Me Mama * Animal Gone Wanderin’   Light Up Your Window Ghosts of Promised Lands Encore (10:30 – 10:36) Like A Ball And Chain # w/ Bob Weir * w/ Mark Karanlast_img read more

The Mother of All Efficiency Retrofits: the Empire State Building Goes Green

The Mother of All Efficiency Retrofits: the Empire State Building Goes Green

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore The Empire State Building will get a green face lift. A planned $20 million retrofit of the skyscraper will save $4.4 million a year in energy costs, reduce the building’s energy consumption by nearly 40 percent and cut its carbon output, according to the Rocky Mountain Institute.  Planners believe it is a model for retrofitting an existing building. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore (Read full report in Seattle P-I) last_img

Remembering a poem and a state champion football team at Fair Park

Remembering a poem and a state champion football team at Fair Park

first_imgJerry Byrd is the former sports editor of the Bossier Press-Tribune and an award-winning columnist. You can contact him by E-mail at [email protected] Diamond BoutiqueHong Kong’s first lab-grown diamond empirePremier Diamond Boutique|SponsoredSponsoredUndoInstant Voice TranslatorInstant Voice Translator (43 Languages) Takes Hong Kong By StormInstant Voice Translator|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPerfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoStanChart by CNBC CatalystBlockchain Is Changing the Game for Trade Financing. Here’s How It’s Driving Future Global Trade.StanChart by CNBC Catalyst|SponsoredSponsoredUndoStrategyCombatIf you own a Computer, then you have to play this Game. No Install.StrategyCombat|SponsoredSponsoredUndoDating.comTop Successful Single Men in Tung ChungDating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndo It is a poem titled “You Must Not Quit,” that I first heard in Jenny Jones’ Senior English class at Fair Park in the 1952-53 school year.When things go wrong, as they sometimes will,When the road you’re trudging seems all uphill,When the funds are low and the debts are high,And you want to smile, but you have to sigh,When care is pressing you down a bit,Rest if you must, but don’t you quit.Life is strange with its twists and turnsAs every one of us sometimes learns;And many a failure turns aboutWhen he might have won had he stuck it out.Don’t give up, though the pace seems slow;You may succeed with another blow!Success is failure turned inside out,The silver tint of the clouds of doubt;And you never can tell how close you are…It may be near, when it seems so far.So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit;When things seem worst, you must not quit.It is a message that applied to many athletic events and other endeavors, before and after my senior year at Fair Park High.It certainly applied to Fair Park’s 1952 football team, which captured the school’s only state championship in football with a 20-0 victory over St. Aloysius at New Orleans in the title game. Fullback Tommy Davis and tackle Harley Brown were All-Staters on that Fair Park team, but all of the touchdowns in the state playoffs were scored by halfback A.L. Williams.That was Fair Park’s third consecutive trip to the state finals, but the previous two teams lost to another band of Indians from Istrouma (Baton Rouge) in the championship games. Fair Park wouldn’t reach the finals again until 1955, when another Istrouma team (led by future Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon) handed the local team a 40-6 drubbing at Shreveport’s State Fair Stadium.Fair Park’s 1952 state champs also lost to Istrouma, 2-0, but that was in regular-season play, not the playoffs. It was also Fair Park’s only loss that season.Davis, who was in the end zone after Fair Park stopped Istrouma at the two yard-line in the last two minutes, was tackled by Istrouma linebacker Ronnie Riley for a safety on a botched play that was supposed to be a pass.Shreveport schools reached the finals in the top classification five years in a row from 1949 to 1953. Byrd won the championship in 1949 with a 34-13 victory over Holy Cross (New Orleans) and Fair Park reached the finals the next three years, losing to Istrouma 20-13 in 1950 and 19-7 in 1951 before winning the 1952 title. Byrd was runnerup to Jesuit (New Orleans) in 1953. Rogers Hampton was an All-State halfback on the 1950 and 1951 Fair Park teams. End Paul Kennon also represented Fair Park on the 1950 All-State team and another end, Gene Gibson, joined Hampton on the 1951 All-State team.last_img read more

‘Doomsday Clock’ ticks 30 seconds closer to midnight’s apocalyptic destruction

‘Doomsday Clock’ ticks 30 seconds closer to midnight’s apocalyptic destruction

first_imgWin McNamee/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The world is as close to apocalyptic destruction as it has ever been in the 71-year history of the symbolic “Doomsday Clock,” the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists said.The Chicago-based nonprofit announced Thursday the decision to advance its Doomsday Clock closer to midnight by 30 seconds. The clock is now two minutes to midnight, the symbolic hour of imminent doom.The last time the symbolic clock edged that close to the end of humanity was in 1953, when the hydrogen bomb was first tested. The clock was as far away as 17 minutes from midnight in 1991, at the end of the Cold War when the United States and the Soviet Union were actively engaged in arms-control negotiations.“This is the closest the clock has ever been to Doomsday, and as close as it was in 1953, at the height of the Cold War,” Rachel Bronson, president and CEO of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, said at a news conference Thursday.“To call the world’s nuclear situation dire is to understate the danger and its immediacy,” she added.Last year, at the start of Donald Trump’s presidency, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock from three minutes, to two minutes and 30 seconds to midnight, reflecting “a darkening security landscape characterized by an increasing recklessness around nuclear rhetoric and increasing attacks on experts and expertise worldwide,” according to Bronson.This year, Bronson pointed to nuclear provocations from North Korea, nuclear exercises built into Russia’s military plans and an enhanced commitment to nuclear weapons in Pakistan, India and China as reasons the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists decided to further advance the Doomsday Clock.The group also weighed the United States’ response, specifically the exchange of provocative rhetoric between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. An insufficient response to climate change, including the Trump administration’s plan to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, was also a significant factor in the group’s decision, Bronson said.“We considered at length the lack of predictability in how the United States is thinking about the future and future use of its own nuclear weapons,” she said. “An unpredictability that is embodied in statements and tweets by the president of the United States.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more