Tag: 小海棠情感神秘园武宪磊

Doctors hail China’s pledge to stop harvesting inmate organs

Doctors hail China’s pledge to stop harvesting inmate organs

first_img In a sign of the issue’s symbolic importance to China, the conference took place in an ornate, chandeliered ballroom inside the Great Hall of the People, the building next to Tiananmen Square that typically hosts foreign leaders and ceremonial Communist Party events.advertisement Tags Chinaorgan harvestingsurgeons By Associated Press Oct. 17, 2016 Reprints Related: In Iran, unique system allows payments for kidney donors HealthDoctors hail China’s pledge to stop harvesting inmate organs Doctors at the conference Monday described meeting patients and visiting hospitals around the country, and said the recorded usage of drugs given to transplant patients lined up with China’s reported numbers of transplants.Dr. Jose Nunez, an adviser on organ transplants to the World Health Organization, told the audience that he believed China was building the “next great” system.“You are taking this country to a leading position within the transplantation world,” he said.Others offered praise for Chinese officials, but stopped short of saying whether they could confirm China had stopped using executed inmates’ organs.“It’s not a matter for us to prove to you that it’s zero,” said Dr. Francis Delmonico, a longtime surgeon and a professor at Harvard Medical School. “It’s a matter for the government to fulfill what is the law, just as it is in the other countries of the world that we go to.”China is believed to perform more executions than any other country, though the government does not disclose how many. Associated Press About the Author Reprints Related: While China suppresses most discussions about human rights, government officials and state media have publicly talked about their commitment to ending a practice opposed by doctors and human rights groups due to fears that it promotes executions and coercion. The former vice minister of health, Dr. Huang Jiefu, publicly acknowledged in 2005 that China harvested executed inmates’ organs for transplant, and a paper he coauthored six years later reported that as many as 90 percent of Chinese transplant surgeries using organs from dead people came from those put to death.Huang has also responded to a report earlier this year that a Canadian patient apparently received a kidney from an executed inmate by announcing that the doctor and the hospital in question were suspended from performing more transplants.A key impediment is that members of a donor’s immediate family have the right to veto any transplant once the person is dead. There is also a traditional aversion to the removal of body parts from the dead and a fear that donated organs could be exploited for monetary gain.Dr. Philip O’Connell, the immediate past president of the Transplantation Society, told reporters later that he would work with doctors supporting reform in any country.“The options are that you completely isolate someone, which means that generally their practices get compounded, or you engage with them and you tell them your point of view and explain why it would be better for them to change,” O’Connell said. “That is, I think in the simple terms, what we’re doing.”— Nomaan Merchant Surgeons from around the world gathered in Beijing in China’s latest effort to fight persistent skepticism about whether its hospitals have stopped performing transplants with the organs of executed prisoners. Ng Han Guan/AP BEIJING — Surgeons from around the world gathered at a conference in Beijing on Monday in China’s latest effort to fight persistent skepticism about whether its hospitals have stopped performing transplants with the organs of executed prisoners.Doctors from the World Health Organization and the Montreal-based Transplantation Society who were invited to the conference by China praised Chinese officials for reforms they have made in the transplant system, including a ban put in place last year on using organs from executed inmates.Doubts persist that China is accurately reporting figures or meeting its pledge given its severe shortage of organ donors and China’s long-standing black-market organ trade. By its own figures, China has one of the lowest rates of organ donation in the world, and even the system’s advocates say it needs hundreds of additional hospitals and doctors.advertisement Hospitals are throwing out organs and denying transplants to meet federal standards last_img read more

8 ways to save big this summer

8 ways to save big this summer

first_img Home Makeover: Make room for a home makeover this summer, because according to the American Home Furnishing Alliance, new furniture hits showrooms in August. That means you can find great savings in the summer months to spruce up your home decor as retailers make room for new inventory. The same goes for outdoor patio furniture, which is best purchased in August as the summer months wrap up. Retailers usually start marking down pieces around the July 4 holiday, but don’t be fooled — the big discounts of up to 50 percent off usually roll in during August.Summer Gear: The end of the summer is the best time to find deals on fun outdoor merchandise. Swimming gear, swing sets, beach toys and other items can be found at discounted prices of 30 to 75 percent off. The back-to-school shopping season is also a great time to buy swimwear, as retailers are getting ready for their fall and winter items to arrive. If you want to experience retail therapy online, check out retailmenot.com before you make your purchase — it’s an online database for coupon codes that can bring in great savings like free shipping.  School and Office Supplies: Back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to be a drag, especially when it can still benefit your wallet. During this time, retailers offer some of the year’s lowest prices on pens, pencils, paper and notebooks, the essentials for any student. Many states also have sales-tax holidays in August, which will save you even more money on school and office supplies. You can also find bargains on other home-office necessities by picking up the weekly ads distributed by Office Depot and Staples. Information from Kiplinger.com and dallasnews.com. Online Savings: It is no surprise that the expense of family summer vacations can add up. Lucky for you, the online coupon industry has been booming with websites like livingsocial.com and groupon.com providing savings of more than 50 percent on meals, drinks, hotels as well as other services. Groupon has just launched the Getaways branch of their site — teaming up with Expedia, they are providing values on unforgettable trips with discounts of up to 60 percent. Flexible Fliers: This summer, flying midweek can make a big difference in fares over flying on the weekend. Valid for travel long after the summer is over, AirTran’s sale offers the cheapest seats on Tuesdays and Wednesdays through Nov. 16.  As an added bonus, remember that Southwest allows your first two bags to fly for free, which can be a great money saver as other airlines can charge up to $120 round-trip. Broadway Tickets: If you’re headed to the Big Apple and need a little drama in your life, the summer months prove to be a good time to see the outgoing year’s hits at great prices. Theatres offer cut-rate prices in order to have a full house, especially during the slower months throughout the summer. Broadway.com offers hotel packages offering for you to see a show and stay the night at the best NYC hotels, in all price ranges. center_img The scorching summer heat doesn’t have to melt away your bank account, too. There are certain products and services that can be scooped up at hot discounts during the summer months, if you know how to buy smart. Gym Memberships: If you haven’t quite gotten around to fulfilling your New Year’s resolution of shedding those extra pounds, now is the time.  Health club business tends to drop in the spring and summer before picking up again in the fall. During this lull, when you’re trying to fit back into that bathing suit, you can score a lower monthly rate or get your enrollment fee waived. For example, Bally Total Fitness is offering no enrollment fee as well as a $12.99 biweekly fee for basic national access to nearly 300 of their Bally Clubs if you join online. Fruits & Veggies: After your visit to the gym, you’re going to want to keep in shape by eating right. Fruits and vegetables are the “it” food group in the summer months, making it a great time to stock up. If you’re looking for an easy way to find out if your favorites are in season, visit fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org, a great guide to produce. Many grocery stores have their savings for the week listed on their websites, making shopping a breeze with the ability to plan ahead and save.last_img read more

Lance Downplays Chances at Tour de France

Lance Downplays Chances at Tour de France

first_imgIn an AP interview, Lance Armstrong downplayed his chances of winning the Tour de France in July, and that he’s willing to work for the others if Team Astana boss Johan Bruyneel asks him to.“I’m going to be very fair about it and respect (team boss Johan Bruyneel’s) orders and respect the team,” Armstrong said. “If that means supporting Alberto or Levi (Leipheimer) or whoever it is, I’ll respect them.”I know Lance’s mission in un-retiring is to increase awareness for cancer, but when’s he going to start representing Team Astana’s colors?You can see more pics from the current training camp on Astana’s site here and listen to a press interview here.last_img

UWF Softball Slated for Rematch Against Shorter in GSC Tournament

UWF Softball Slated for Rematch Against Shorter in GSC Tournament

first_imgLIVE VIDEO | LIVE STATSPENSACOLA, Fla. – With a remarkable regular season behind it, the University of West Florida softball team enters the Gulf South Conference Tournament as the 3-seed with a game against 6-seed Shorter scheduled for Thursday. The game will begin at 10 a.m. and will feature live stats and a live video broadcast, put on by the GSC. With a win, UWF (37-13, 23-10 GSC) would play No. 2 Valdosta State on Thursday afternoon. West Florida’s 37 regular-season wins are its most since 2010, while the Argos’ 23 conference victories are their most since its 60-6 season in 2005. UWF added three players to the All-Gulf South Conference teams on Tuesday, in Kalyn Chapman, Meghan Toney and Rhiannon Sassman. This is the first time UWF has had three all-conference players in the same season since 2010. Chapman ranked in the top five in the GSC in wins (19), opponent batting average (.208), innings pitched (148.1), and strikeouts (153). She was the only player to earn a spot on the all-conference team twice this year, making the list as both a pitcher and a designated player. Toney led all second basemen in the GSC with 10 doubles and 49 runs scored. She recorded 15 multi-hit games, reached base in 44 of her 50 games and proved herself as one of the top defenders in the GSC over the year. Sassman’s 45 RBIs are the most for a UWF batter since 2010, and her .350 batting average is the highest for a freshman in UWF history. She is the only player in the league to be named GSC Player of the Week twice this season.Scouting Shorter UWF enters the 2016 GSC Softball Tournament as the No. 3 seed and will face 6-seed Shorter on Thursday. A win on Thursday morning will send UWF to a second-round game against Valdosta State at 3 p.m. that day. West Florida has been one of the best teams in GSC Tournament history, with the fourth-most wins (66), trips to the conference finals (6) and titles (3), with the last coming in 2005. UWF went 1-2 against Shorter last weekend and are 8-7 this season against teams in the field, which includes a sweep over then-No. 18 Valdosta State.All-GSC Honors The Turnaround The 2016 UWF softball team has improved its record tremendously since last year, from 19-30 to 37-13. West Florida is coming off a 16-game winning streak and picked up 18 wins in its last 21 games of the season (.857). The Argonauts have posted a 17.5 game improvement so far, which ranks as the 15th-best single-season turnaround in Division II history. UWF has improved in every facet of the game since last year. The pitching staff has been especially sharp, as the team’s ERA has dropped from 3.57 to 2.37 and opponents’ batting average has dropped 26 points. The offense has also seen notable improvement. The team is hitting .313 with a .425 slugging percentage through its first 50 games, compared to a .263 average and a .347 slugging percentage in 2015. West Florida started to gain national attention following the weekend sweep over No. 18 Valdosta State on 2/27-28, and after a weekend sweep over No. 21 Delta State on 4/16-17. UWF earned a spot in the NFCA Top 25, coming in at 21. UWF is already in the record books for its improvement from 2004 to 2005. West Florida won 36 games in ’04 before adding 24 more wins in 2005.The GSC Tournament West Florida ranked fifth in the NCAA’s final South Region rankings before the NCAA Tournament field is decided next Monday. As things stand right now, the Argonauts are in line to travel to Florence, Alabama, for a four-team regional with North Alabama, Alabama Huntsville and Florida Tech, hosted by UNA. UWF earned its highest ranking of the year at No. 21 in the NFCA Top 25 poll that came out after the sweep over Delta State. The Argos picked up 14 points in the most recent NFCA poll, good for 27th nationally.  Print Friendly Version Niki Cook provides a threat at the top of the order, as the sophomore ranks second in the league in stolen bases (32) and fourth in on-base percentage (.497).  Kameron Carter is third in the conference with 12 home runs and is seventh with a .681 slugging percentage. Payton Lippert has done most of the work in the circle for the Hawks, picking up 16 wins and holding opponents to a .239 batting average. Lippert most recently was named the GSC’s Freshman of the Week for her work against UWF last weekend. Shorter has the top relief ace in the conference, in Kalei Kimbrell. Kimbrell has 10 saves on the season – by far the most in the GSC – with a 1.95 ERA and 46 strikeouts in 50.1 innings pitched.In the Pollslast_img read more