Tag: 带工作室的妹子安全吗

90-Year-Old Man Serenades Love of His Life on 70th Wedding Anniversary

90-Year-Old Man Serenades Love of His Life on 70th Wedding Anniversary

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAfter getting married on his 20th birthday, an Arkansas man is still making his bride swoon 70 years later.90-Year-old Paul Miller sang a romantic rendition of Bing Crosby‘s “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” at a ceremony where he and his wife renewed their vows and celebrated the anniversary with 60 family members.SWEET: 14 Years After Receiving Shoebox Gift, Filipino Girl Marries Idaho Boy Who Sent it“It was so sweet,” one granddaughter recalled. “Their love is definitely a true love.”The couple shares love not only with their own family but with kids who need help. Over the years, they have invited into their home a number of parentless youth who have aged out of the U.S. foster care system.(WATCH the video below from Inside Edition)SPREAD the Love! Click to Share – OR, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Jacob May’s late triple propels Ravenna over Shelby in boys basketball action

Jacob May’s late triple propels Ravenna over Shelby in boys basketball action

first_imgShares Not relevant Fox Sports Go Other Share × Ads by Amazon Bestseller DEAL OF THE DAY Mail Not relevant LocalSportsJournal.comJacob May’s game-winning three-point basket with two seconds left in regulation propelled the Ravenna boys basketball team to a 51-49 win over Shelby in West Michigan Conference play on Thursday.The Bulldogs trailed 12-4 after the first quarter, then went on a 17-7 second quarter run to take a slim 21-19 advantage at halftime. Ravenna then increased its lead to 40-34 heading into the final stanza.The Tigers attempted a comeback with a 15-11 fourth quarter run but fell just short.Ravenna (6-5, 4-4) was paced by Josh Cox with 22 points, five rebounds and six assists, while May added seven points and Ryan Osmer chipped in with seven points, four rebounds and four steals.The Tigers were led by Tyler Schouten and Tristan Landis with 11 points each while Latrell Sobers contributed with 10. Displayed poorly Other × The League Report a problem This item is… (22) Add Comments (Max 320 characters) DEAL OF THE DAY ENDS IN Dude Perfect Signature Bow Nerf Sports Bi… Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. ENDS IN Report a problem This item is… ENDS IN Bestseller Inappropriate / Offensive Report a problem This item is… Franklin Sports MLB Electronic Baseball … ENDS IN $14.99 DEAL OF THE DAY Inappropriate / Offensive ENDS IN ENDS IN Bestseller Report a problem This item is… Bestseller Displayed poorly (1009) Inappropriate / Offensive (124) × Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Add Comments (Max 320 characters) × Bestseller Share Other Other Not relevant (35539) Report a problem This item is… DEAL OF THE DAY (8187) × Report a problem This item is… × Othercenter_img Report a problem This item is… Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Displayed poorly Bestseller Displayed poorly Bestseller Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Displayed poorly $15.29$17.99 Not relevant × (33138) Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Displayed poorly Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Inappropriate / Offensive Not relevant $3.99 Report a problem This item is… DEAL OF THE DAY Inappropriate / Offensive NBC Sports Other Displayed poorly Displayed poorly $0.00 Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. DEAL OF THE DAY Not relevant Not relevant Inappropriate / Offensive × DEAL OF THE DAY $0.00 Inappropriate / Offensive ENDS IN Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. $0.00 $59.99 (1862) Other Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Special… FOX Sports: Stream live NFL, College Footbal… Shop Now Bestseller Add Comments (Max 320 characters) DEAL OF THE DAY Add Comments (Max 320 characters) Not relevant (1461) A Warrior’s Heart Thank you! This will help us improve your ad experience. We will try not to show you such ads again. Inappropriate / Offensive Other $26.86$49.99 ENDS IN Ads by Amazonlast_img read more

HIGHLY CALF-INATING: Kids catch a calf and sometimes a career

HIGHLY CALF-INATING: Kids catch a calf and sometimes a career

first_img Wyatt waits with his dad to receive his Red Angus calf. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Red Rock, Wyatt’s Red Angus calf. Wyatt Sandell pulls a calf out of the ring after successfully wrangling it, to win a spot in the Catch-A-Calf Program. Wyatt brushes Red Rocks hair against the grain to resulting in a fluffier coat. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt ties Red Rock to the railing of the arena as the exhibitors wait to show their calves. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt washes Red Rock at his grandparents ranch. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt leads Red Rock onto the scales to get his final weight before showing. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Brittany puts the finishing touches on Red Rock before showing. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt stands with Red Rock in the arena with other exhibitors during the Showmanship judging.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt leads Red Rock on a walk at the ranch on his grandparents land. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt walks Red Rock through the pens in the Education Building of the National Western Complex to the arena for showing.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado A variety of grooming materials used for Red Rock. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt Sandell looks through his families trailer at his newly acquired Red Angus calf. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado 1 of 15 Wyatt jokes with family and friends as he waits for the judging to begin. Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt stands with Red Rock in the arena with other exhibitors during the Showmanship judging.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado Wyatt leads Red Rock to the wash rack to give his calf a bath.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel ColoradoDENVER | Last January, 12-year-old Wyatt Sandell caught a calf, a friend and probably a career.This week, he walked away from the National Western Stock Show with only the determination to make ranching his life.It was a cold winter day when Wyatt joined dozens of other boys and girls to storm into the stadium arena at the Denver Coliseum in hopes of snagging a calf in the annual Catch-A-Calf event.The decades-old program lets kids catch calves in often hilarious chaos on the stadium floor, and keep them for a year to raise. The following January, they bring the yearlings back for competition and sale.Sponsors buy the calves and give the kids a shot at being a rancher.“It gives the kids an opportunity to raise a steer, when it wouldn’t be possible otherwise,” said Clancy Anderson, the Livestock Coordinator for the National Western Stock Show.The child ranchers learn far more than the science of animal ranching. More than anything, it’s about networking, patience, diligence and communication, officials said.“The networking is indispensable,” said Ben Duke, the head of the Catch-A-Calf committee for the NWSS. He was Wyatt’s sponsor. “It’s an incredible educational opportunity… and is the most iconic program the National Western Stock Show offers.”Wyatt and his family think so, too.Wyatt plays with Red Rock, his Red Angus calf, on his grandparents ranch in Sedalia.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Colorado“He’d rather be working with livestock than playing video games,” said Brittany Sandell, Wyatt’s mother. It says a lot when a teen like Wyatt is not just willing but anxious to traipse out into the cold to care for a stubborn calf than hit the couch and the controller for a few hours.Red Rock was a finicky calf, with particular eating habits. Wyatt’s favorite bull rider, Lane Frost, rode an infamous bull named Red Rock, and that became his calf’s name.Red Rock never managed to put on the weight that Wyatt and his mom Brittany had hoped he would. The average weight of the calves when show-time rolled around was 1,320 pounds. Red Rock’s final weight was 1,082 pounds.Wyatt is no greenhorn at taking care of animals. He’s a fifth-generation rancher. He’s raised sheep and pigs for show and sale and has a few horses of his own, but nothing is a given in this industry. Feeding a calf that has challenging eating habits can be a task in and of itself, and some will go as far to prepare gourmet-style meals to get their calves to eat. “Stuff the chef at the Broadmoor doesn’t even make,” Duke joked. A year of feeding, grooming, talking and worrying brought the duo back to the stock show for the final return this week.Wyatt stands with Red Rock in the arena with other exhibitors during the Showmanship judging.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel ColoradoIt was time for weigh in.Brittany, visibly frustrated, said, “It’s bad. The long and the short is that it’s bad. You put that much time, money and effort into raising the calf, and to get that kind of return is not good.”Wyatt will sell his calf for about $1.20 a pound. His mom said they invested about $3,000 into raising Red Rock on food, equipment and transport. It was discouraging but he wasn’t totally discouraged.The hardest part comes after settling up.The kids lead their calves out of the ring and into the stock yards, almost in a march, where they say their goodbyes.After the competition ends, Wyatt walks Red Rock out of the arena to the stock yards.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel ColoradoWyatt stands in a pen in the stock yards with Red Rock before having to leave his calf for good.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel ColoradoWyatt led Red Rock into a pen in the stock yards and stood there with his calf.Surrounded by others in the competition, it could have just as easily been only them in that crowded pen. A quiet moment between two friends. Wyatt left the pen and went straight to his mom, briefly crying on her shoulder. Wyatt cries on his mothers shoulder after exiting the pen where he left Red Rock.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel ColoradoDespite the difficult goodbye, Wyatt, now 13, said that after raising the calf, he knows what he wants to do for a living. “I want to sell cattle,” Wyatt said.Wyatt and Red Rock share one last moment together before Wyatt leaves the stock yards to go home.Photo by Philip B. Poston/Sentinel Coloradolast_img read more

Mercedes–Benz Junior Golf Championships kick off this month

Mercedes–Benz Junior Golf Championships kick off this month

first_imgThe 11th Mercedes-Benz Junior Golf Championships, which start this month will continue the trend of promoting both golfing skills and educational excellence.  This season, golfers will be awarded extra bonus points for educational grades. The winners from the Masters Final will go to on compete in an international junior golf tournament overseas, except for those in the 23 year and under class, where the winners will compete in a Thailand PGA Tour event.The first qualifying round of the Championship will be held on 15-16 September at Royal Hills, Nakorn Nayok.  There are a total of 4 age categories for boys and girls; 12 years and under, 14 years and under, 17 years and under and 23 years and under.For a full list of the scheduled dates and courses or for more information, contact Pentangle Promotions Co., Ltd. on 02-311-3414-5 or go to website www. pentanglepromotions.com.last_img read more

America’s oldest pro ballpark needs our help

America’s oldest pro ballpark needs our help

first_imgIn this June 24, 2015, file photo, Mo’ne Davis, of the Anderson Monarchs, gets ready to bat against the Willie Mays RBI Birmingham team at Rickwood Field, in Birmingham, Ala. The field is the oldest ballpark in America but it requires at least a half-million dollars in repairs to get it back in playing shape. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)An elderly friend needs our help.Birmingham’s Rickwood Field is the oldest professional ballpark in America _ yep, it’s been around even longer than Fenway Park and Wrigley Field _ but it’s really starting to show its age.A couple of months ago, city officials shut it down. Major structural repairs are needed, not surprising for a stadium that’s approaching its 107th birthday.It’s going to take money _ a lot of money _ to get the gates open again.That would be money well spent.Rickwood Field is a virtual time machine, an irreplaceable link to a bygone era when America’s pastime was the only game in town.Since its opening on Aug. 18, 1910, more than 100 Hall of Famers have swung a bat or thrown a ball at the corner of 2nd Avenue and 12th Street on the west side of Alabama’s largest city, everyone from Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb to Jackie Robinson and Hank Aaron.This was not only the longtime home of the Birmingham Barons, a minor-league team, but the Birmingham Black Barons of the Negro League, a powerhouse squad from the ugly era of Jim Crow that included Satchel Paige and Willie Mays among its alumni.“Rickwood filled a role as kind of the cultural center for both the Caucasian and the African-American communities in Birmingham,” said David Brewer, executive director of a nonprofit organization that manages the park, Friends of Rickwood. “That’s significant in terms of American social history.”The Black Barons ceased operations in 1960, and Rickwood’s days seemed numbered when the Barons left 27 years later for a shiny new stadium in the suburbs.I certainly didn’t expect it to last much longer when I visited for the first time in 1991 .The green paint was peeling. The roof was leaky and worn out. Weeds sprouted between the seats. There were two scoreboards _ one for baseball, the other for football games that were also played there _ but neither worked. Surely, I thought, this stately little park would soon go the way of Forbes Field and Shibe Park and the Polo Grounds.But, somehow, Rickwood survived.City officials managed to stave off the wrecking ball, with help from a determined group of volunteers tirelessly raising money to address an ever-evolving list of repairs. Before long, Rickwood was as busy as it had ever been, with colleges and high schools taking the field in the late winter and spring, followed by a full slate of various adult and youth league tournaments through the summer and into fall. In all, it was used about 175 days a year.The Barons even returned, albeit for only one game a season. They called it the Rickwood Classic, a true throwback game played in the daylight, complete with fans in period clothing, umpires wearing bow ties, the lineups written in chalk on a board beneath the stands, and two teams decked out in old-timey uniforms.“It’s important not to be America’s oldest empty ballpark,” Brewer said. “We view the playing of baseball here as essential to the continued success of the ballpark.”There was no Rickwood Classic this season. After the ballpark was shuttered on April 7, the Barons substituted a “Turn Back The Clock” game, which was held Wednesday at their latest home, 4-year-old Regions Field in downtown Birmingham.A nice gesture.But not the same.The Barons hope to return to Rickwood in 2018, but that’s going to take a major financial commitment.Mayor William Bell told al.com the city is willing to spend a half-million dollars on needed repairs, but quickly added that “any other help we get is appreciated.” The Friends of Rickwood have a donation link on their web site and also set up a GoFundMe account that hopes to raise $25,000.As of late Friday afternoon, just under $2,000 had been donated.“It’s a very challenging project,” Brewer said. “Communities are wrestling with what to do with these old parks. Is it worth doing it? Is the money available? These are tough questions. You have to make both a cultural and economic rationale for doing this.”Until its most recent setback, Rickwood served as a de facto museum for fans who wanted to see what the game like at the turn of the last century. The park was open at least five days a week to anyone who wanted to take a look around. Brewer said he’s welcomed visitors from all over this country, and other countries as well.“People say very nice things in the guest book, beyond things like, `Boy, the grass looks great’ and `This place sure looks clean.’ They say things like, `This place is amazing. We traveled across the country and it was worth every minute to get here,”’ he related. “That tells us this is a project worth doing.”So, if you’re an avid baseball fan, or someone who appreciates American history, or maybe you’re just miffed that we inexplicably tore down true landmarks such as Yankee Stadium and Comiskey Park, consider making a donation to save the oldest ballpark we’ve got left. It’s at least as worthy as spending billions on all these shiny new stadiums.I’ll leave the last word to Bob Veale, from the story I wrote 26 years ago when I ran into the former major league pitcher on my visit to Rickwood.“It’s still a part of this neighborhood,” he said, the words as relevant now as they were then. “It’s a part of America.”___Paul Newberry is a sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at pnewberry(at)ap.org or at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/paul%20newberry___For more AP baseball coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseballlast_img
Lenny loves it

Lenny loves it

first_imgST KILDA star Lenny Hayes was a welcome visitor to Pakenham on Friday. In conjunction with his football boot sponsor…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img