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ABMS aims to revolutionize data flow, speed decisions

ABMS aims to revolutionize data flow, speed decisions

first_imgABMS aims to revolutionize data flow, speed decisions The Department of the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office held a Virtual Industry Day on the Advanced Battle Management System, or ABMS, acquisition effort March 31. The event was attended by more than 600 participants from more than 300 industry partners.The ABMS acquisition effort will leverage commercial technologies, infrastructure, and data sharing best practices to deliver modernized operational capability to the joint warfighter.Randy Walden, DAF RCO director and Integrating ABMS program executive officer, told the audience over the Zoom call that industry feedback on precisely how ABMS will enable the Joint All Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, requirement is vital to success.“When we log onto the internet, we expect the 21st century level of technology that allows us to do machine-to-machine data sharing. My question to those online is why don’t we enjoy that today in the Department of Defense,” Walden posed. “We are ready to embark on an infrastructure that allows us to do just that and we’re going to need your help.”The program objectives are to build a digital infrastructure that connects the joint warfighting force, enables sharing of information across the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Space Force, joint allies, partners and multi-domains and provide decision superiority to tactical, operational and strategic customers.Walden described the process as “sensing, making sense of that information, and then acting on that information.” He compared it to the observe, orient, decide, act, or OODA loop, commonly used in the Air Force.“We want to take exquisite data and compress it in both time and complexity in a manner that allows those decision makers to act on the information well inside our adversaries’ OODA loop,” Walden said.Moving forward to create this environment, ABMS will focus on six attributes: secure processing, connectivity, data management, applications, sensor integration, and effects integration.The ABMS acquisition strategy focuses on delivering capability to the joint warfighter through capability releases and enduring digital infrastructure investments. Requests for information from industry will be posted through the standard process via the Government Point of Entry.“We definitely look forward to working with you starting today and well into the future to get your thoughts and your expertise,” Walden said. “This is not a problem that can be solved solely within the Air Force.” /U.S. Air Force Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:acquisition, air force, battle, Century, digital, director, environment, future, Government, industry, infrastructure, Internet, online, participants, technology, U.S. Air Force, Zoomlast_img read more

Gardai investigating 3 car collision on main L’kenny to Ballybofey Rd

Gardai investigating 3 car collision on main L’kenny to Ballybofey Rd

first_img Pinterest Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Homepage BannerNews Investigations are continuing following a crash on the main Letterkenny to Ballybofey Road earlier today.Emergency services attended the scene of the three car collision this afternoon.Gardai say no major injuries were reported. Google+ Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA center_img Twitter Gardai investigating 3 car collision on main L’kenny to Ballybofey Rd RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – November 21, 2019 WhatsApp Previous articleDriver caught speeding and drug driving in BurtNext articleMain Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Thursday November 21st News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

[email protected] courts Japan’s Indies

[email protected] courts Japan’s Indies

first_img[email protected] courts Japan’s IndiesDespite Xbox’s commercial failure in Japan, Chris Charla is enthusiastic about the prospects for local indie developers on the platformRob FaheyContributing EditorMonday 5th September 2016Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleMicrosoftAs director of Microsoft’s [email protected] developer program, a fair bit of Chris Charla’s job involves evangelism – travelling the world to extol the virtues of the program to talented developers wherever they may be found. One might expect that Japan, where he spoke at the BitSummit event earlier this summer, would be hostile territory for such overtures. The Xbox One has failed even more dramatically in Japan than its predecessors, and indeed, it’s hard not to notice that the audience for Charla’s enthusiastic talk about [email protected] is smaller than for almost any other talk during the weekend. Such a muted reception to the Xbox message doesn’t seem to faze Charla himself in the slightest, though. He’s enthused about the show (“It’s an awesome event – every year it’s bigger and better… it’s just awesome to see the scene growing and exploding so much over here”) and adamant that regardless of any commercial difficulties Xbox One may be facing in Japan, developers here remain interested in he opportunity of working on the platform.”So when we start a conversation with them about the global opportunity, sure, we’ve had situations where someone has said, ‘Oh, I thought this would only be popular locally'” “The reason I’m here is to talk to the creators about the worldwide opportunity, and people are really receptive to that – they’re really excited by the idea of doing a single worldwide submission and getting their game shipping all around the world, and by the size of the potential opportunity in the US and in other territories.”One stumbling block can be that developers who have targeted a local audience may not realise that there’s a broader global opportunity for their work. “The first people indie developers make games for is themselves, and of course they look to the things going on around them. So when we start a conversation with them about the global opportunity, sure, we’ve had situations where someone has said, ‘Oh, I thought this would only be popular locally.’ And we say, no seriously, that’s a JRPG, those are very popular in the US and you should bring it over here… People are pretty receptive to that. It’s just a matter of education and talking to people about the opportunity.”The real barriers for Japanese indie developers reaching out to the world are neither technical nor creative, Charla asserts, but linguistic. “If a developer doesn’t know English, there can be a bit of a barrier. It’s one of the reasons we have a local [email protected] team in Japan, so that people can work with local representatives who are Japanese, or who speak Japanese, and can help navigate the whole process.” This approach is paying dividends; among the games which have come to Xbox through the Japanese team are QUBE, Reversi Quest and perhaps most notably, Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night, the new title from Castlevania director Koji Igarashi.The continuing evolution of Xbox into a component of the broader Windows 10 platform as well as a gaming platform in its own right has also reached [email protected], with the program now also supporting developers who want to use Xbox Live functionality on Windows 10. This creates new opportunities for the program in territories like Japan, where the Xbox One has a small footprint but Windows gaming (albeit a very local flavour of it) is a big deal.”[[email protected] on Windows 10] is something we talk to people about constantly, absolutely,” Charla says. “Especially if a developer doesn’t know much about it, about what it is and how it works, and how as a social network it really magnetises people to the platform.””It’s not just the [email protected] team; it’s people all throughout Microsoft, whether it’s Phil Spencer forwarding us something, or an engineer working on Excel saying, hey, my friend made this cool game, you guys should check it out.” When Charla or other [email protected] team members come to an indie event, it’s not just to stand on a stage and evangelise the service; going out on the show floor and talking to developers is also a big part of the job, and one that Charla seems to enjoy enormously. He waxes lyrical about one game that struck him on the BitSummit show floor, an indie RPG set in the scientific age of discovery called Principe: Master of Science: “In the demo you play as Isaac Newton, and you have to do some discoveries around the refraction of light, publish a paper, submit it to the Royal Society – your fame meter goes up and I think you can eventually join the Royal Society itself… I mean, that is so cool. I just saw that and thought, ‘Woah, this is awesome.'” His enthusiasm for this side of the job, going out and meeting with creators, is palpable. It’s an enthusiasm, he claims, that is not only shared across the [email protected] team, but across Microsoft as a whole.”Everybody in the program goes out and sees things, and brings games to the program. Whether it’s me, or Karen Mitchell, who is our database architect… Karen Mitchell brings games to the program. She goes to E3, goes to different shows, goes to indie meet-ups in Seattle, she spots games and she says, you guys should come check us out. It’s not just the [email protected] team; it’s people all throughout Microsoft, whether it’s Phil Spencer forwarding us something, or an engineer working on Excel saying, hey, my friend made this cool game, you guys should check it out. Everybody at Microsoft sends developers to [email protected] and sends cool games to [email protected]”This approach – using the reach of the entire company to seek out and engage with talented new developers – is a far cry from how the games industry used to work only a few years ago. Then, developers were expected to go cap-in-hand to publishers and platform holders to pitch their ideas; now Microsoft, along with Sony and Nintendo, sends staff around the world to seek out talented teams and interesting games at shows and events. “I was talking briefly to Tetsuya Mizuguchi today – we’ve known each other for 20 years, and we were talking about exactly that change to how the world works,” Charla says. “It’s so much better today. It’s fantastic. Don’t get me wrong – there are tons of developers who put together pitches and go out to publishers and platform holders, lots of games still get signed that way – but having people out looking at games, working to make sure that we get all the great games on our platforms… For developers, that’s the way it should be.””The way it used to be just wasn’t a great model,” he continues. “I remember when I was a developer, we spent a year just trying to get a console dev kit – from anybody, for any console! We were a PC and handheld developer, and it was like a closed shop. Now, we give developers dev kits for free… [As a platform holder] I think, personally, that if you’re not hungry – if you’re not out there, chasing things, you’re not doing a very good job. You need to be out there looking for things. If you’re just sitting back, well, first of all it’s boring, and second of all I just don’t think that’s the way the world should work any more.”Going out to find games is only the start of the process for [email protected], of course. As well as working to support developers in territories like Japan with local teams, Charla says that a huge amount of effort is focused on smoothing over and speeding up the process of dealing with Xbox for game creators. “That’s a lot of the work,” he explains. “A lot of the day to day, unseen work at [email protected] is related to figuring out how we can improve the database so that developers can get their game shipped with, say, three fewer emails sent to Microsoft. Every time we do that, we free up a little bit of time for somebody to have a conversation.””When a player turns on his or her Xbox One, we want them to see the broadest array of great games possible… The only way we could make that happen was to make it as easy as possible to get on the platform” Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Those conversations with developers are arguably one of the most valuable parts of the [email protected] program. On stage, Charla enthused about the opportunity for developers to engage directly with Xbox to discuss promotion opportunities or figure out the most beneficial launch timing – a relationship that goes over and above the database-driven submission process that defines creators’ experiences with platforms like Apple’s App Store or Google Play. “We focus so much on improving our documentation, our tools and our education so that developers don’t have to ask mundane questions,” he says. “Instead, when they’re talking to us and ask a question, it’s a meaningful question specifically about their game.”It’s not only Microsoft that has overhauled its procedures for working with small and independent developers in recent years, of course. Both Sony and Nintendo have also made changes aimed at making their platforms more inviting to indies, and while it’s not always plain sailing, developers largely praise the newfound openness (or semi-opennness) of console platforms. For Xbox, though, [email protected] appears to offer something very valuable – an opportunity to offset the platform’s commercial weakness in Japan by wooing the nation’s booming indie development scene in spite of Japanese consumers’ apathy to the console. A trip to an event in Japan may present a more uphill challenge to Chris Charla and his team than an indie event in the United States or Europe, but if it gets the cream of Japanese indie games onto Xbox, it’s a challenge worth facing.”The place it all starts for us is thinking about the players,” Charla concludes. “When a player turns on his or her Xbox One, we want them to see the broadest array of great games possible… The only way we could make that happen was to make it as easy as possible to get on the platform. That’s been the guiding light for [email protected] – just make it easy to get games on the platform. Be open to developers. Help developers. The net result is that we’ve got fantastic games on the platform, and that’s awesome for players.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesApple questions credibility of Xbox testimonyiPhone maker asserts that Microsoft did not produce evidence to back Lori Wright’s claims of unprofitable consolesBy James Batchelor 2 days agoEpic pushed for subscription-free multiplayer on Xbox ahead of Apple battleCEO Tim Sweeney told Xbox boss Phil Spencer that “certain plans for August” would create an “extraordinary opportunity”By James Batchelor 7 days agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Long-time vocal critic of Mission city hall now backing former mayor in county race

Long-time vocal critic of Mission city hall now backing former mayor in county race

first_imgPolitics can be a strange game. And observers of the game need look no farther than Mission where a vocal city hall critic for the last four years, Bill Nichols, is now supporting the former mayor for county commissioner.Bill Nichols (R) listens to his council opponent, Suzie Gibbs, during a candidate forum earlier this year ath the Sylvester Powell Community Center.Nichols is known for his website, SaveMission.net, that has been a focal point for criticism of city government. Often at the point of the criticism was former Mission Mayor Laura McConwell and former city administrator Mike Scanlon. Now, Nichols is not only backing McConwell in her run for the county commission, but he is actively recruiting people to place signs for her.Nichols, also known for videotaping city council meetings, started the site in 2010. The city’s Transportation Utility Fee (TUF), known as the “driveway tax” to opponents, was the impetus for Nichols to create his site and vocally oppose a number of city initiatives. “The driveway tax: that’s what set me off,” Nichols says. He helped organize a march on city hall over the issue.Nichols and a core group also were critical of the city on other issues – especially around funding – including the rebuild of the city pool, the Johnson Drive (west of Lamar) and Nall Avenue projects. Nichols says, he was “never against Laura McConwell” but against some of the initiatives she backed as mayor. And, he never questioned her leadership abilities, he says. “She is good at gathering people (around an idea).”Nichols also wants to see Mission represented on the commission and McConwell, he says, has been the face of Mission for the last decade. When he sent out a recent email to his group announcing his support for McConwell, many of the people in his group couldn’t believe it – and he got some pushback, he says.In the recent city election, Nichols ran for city council and was beaten by incumbent Suzie Gibbs. He also was a strong supporter of newly-elected Mayor Steve Schowengerdt. No longer videotaping at council meetings, Nichols, 74, is leaving his website up. “But, it’s a whole different ball game,” he says of the city with new council members, administrator and mayor. And the postings have slowed down since the April election, but not stopped.last_img read more

Locomotive milestone for Trans-Trading

Locomotive milestone for Trans-Trading

first_imgThe train, which measured 19.5 m x 3.26 m x 4.41 m, was first transported to the German port of Rostock, before being loaded onto a vessel and shipped to Hanko.Trans-Trading is a member of the XLProjects network.  www.trans-trading.dewww.xlprojects.netlast_img

Offensive balance overrated for Dan Mullen’s quarterbacks

Offensive balance overrated for Dan Mullen’s quarterbacks

first_imgSep 26, 2015; Auburn, AL, USA; Mississippi State Bulldogs quarterback Dak Prescott (15) passing against the Auburn Tigers during the first quarter at Jordan Hare Stadium. Mandatory Credit: John David Mercer-USA TODAY SportsSep 26, 2015; Auburn, AL, USA; Mississippi State Bulldogs quarterback Dak Prescott (15) passing against the Auburn Tigers during the first quarter at Jordan Hare Stadium. Mandatory Credit: John David Mercer-USA TODAY SportsSTARKVILLE The flat-screen televisions broadcasting ESPN, the airwaves of talk radio and chatter on Twitter all agree: Mississippi State has a problem. The offense, which has the fewest carries in the SEC, doesn’t have balance.“You guys talk about balance. One thing that hasn’t been brought up in our offensive meeting? Balance,” MSU coach Dan Mullen said. “What’s brought up is how we get first downs. How do we move the ball? How do we get the ball in the end zone?”MSU lost seven starters on offense from a year ago. The Bulldogs inherited an inexperienced offensive line and an unproven set of running backs. They also returned the best quarterback in the SEC and the deepest group of wide receivers since Dan Mullen took over in 2009.“We’re going to do what we’re going to do to win in how the game plays and how people play us,” Mullen said. “A lot of people who play us want to stop the run first and we’re able to throw the ball. (Balance) doesn’t concern me.”Through a quarter of the season, Prescott has attempted 142 passes. Projected into a 13-game season, Prescott would finish his senior year with 604 attempts. Mississippi State as a team has never attempted more than 442 passes.“When you look at those stats, especially early in the season, they can get skewed one way or the other because one game can really skew your stats, early in the season,” Mullen said. “Over the course of the season, it will balance out more.”Entering 2015, Mullen has coached 130 games as a head coach at Mississippi State or as an offensive coordinator at Florida. He’s had a quarterback attempt 34 passes in 19 games (14.6 percent).This year, Prescott has thrown the ball at least 34 times in three of the four games (75 percent).“When you have an older quarterback, in those situations, I don’t mind throwing it and putting the game in his hands,” Mullen said.Prescott, a fifth-year senior, is the only quarterback in the country that ranks in the top 40 in pass attempts and doesn’t have an interception.“It’s about knowing what the defense is going to give us and knowing the looks of the defense pre-snap and reading it post-snap, and making sure I’m on the same page with the receivers,” Prescott said.Prior to this season, a Mullen-led quarterback at Mississippi State has attempted 34 or more passes in 10 of 77 games or 13 percent of the games. Mullen’s quarterbacks at Florida reached the 34-pass threshold in 9 of 53 games (16.9 percent).Mullen is 11-8 in those games.At Florida, Mullen went 7-2 when Chris Leak and Tim Tebow threw it more than 34 times in a game. Leak won five of six games including the 2007 national championship game against Ohio State and the 2006 Outback Bowl.Prescott is 4-5 in games in which he attempted at least 34 passes.“I’m good with whatever’s working. I’m going to go with it,” Mullen said. “If we’re running it well, I’m going to see if you can stop us. If we’re throwing the ball really well, we’ll keep throwing it.”Mississippi State ran the ball 57.7 percent of it plays last year. This year, the Bulldogs have passed the ball 57.5 percent of the time.In short yardage situations (needing three-yards or less on any given down), Mullen has called a rush on 21 of 30 plays or 70 percent of the time. Last year, the Bulldogs ran the ball 114 times in 150 instances (76 percent).Overall, Mississippi State is averaging 6.82 yards per play. That’s better than its 6.67-yard average that helped them lead the Southeastern Conference last year in total offense.“We’ve got some players on the perimeter. You say, our quarterback is hot, we’ve got guys on the perimeter, let’s keep making some plays down the field and keep (the opponent) on edge,” Mullen said. “I think it starts to go that way sometimes.”The pass-first offense has Mississippi State at 3-1 and a field goal away from a 4-0 record and perhaps a top 10 ranking.Still, Mullen admitted he would like to run the ball with better success in the future, before pausing and smiling.“I like throwing the ball,” Mullen said.Contact Michael Bonner at [email protected] Follow @MikeBBonner on Twitter.last_img read more