Tag: 想包个大学生怎么联系方式

PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions

PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions

first_imgAdvertisements By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporter . FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Energy and Mining, Hillary Alexander, says there is need to implement provisions of Jamaica’s energy policy to address challenges, including high costs. Speaking at the inaugural Dr, Raymond Wright Memorial Lecture at the Mona Campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI), on Thursday (November 10), Ms. Alexander noted that the Government spent over $1 billion importing some 20 million barrels of oil last year. Transportation and electricity generation accounted for a significant percentage of the consumption of the imported oil, at 28 and 33 per cent, respectively. Ms. Alexander pointed to figures for 2010, which showed that the percentage of alternative energy generated amounted to the equivalent of some 816,000 barrels of oil, which she termed “not an insignificant saving on our fuel import bill”.  “Today, there is consensus that energy is the key to revolutionizing our productive base and our national competitiveness, even as the current trends are serious causes for concern and require both short and long term solutions,” she said. She noted that Dr. Wright, the late former Group Managing Director of the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ), understood the challenges associated with the availability and provisions of energy, locally. “He understood that the challenge for manufacturers, investors and other players in the business sector, is to be creative and innovative in implementing cleaner energy solutions, in conserving and doing more with what we have,” she stated. She said Dr. Wright saw and embraced the need for investing in cleaner technologies, and the adoption of energy management strategies placing greater reliance on alternative energy sources to allow developers and producers a competitive advantage  in the global economy. The Permanent Secretary said Dr. Wright was also a proponent of exploring the wide range of low carbon technologies available, as well as others that need to be pursued and implemented in the fight against climate change. “He knew that the transition towards clean energy is a part of the responsibility that we have to preserve the environment, not just for ourselves, but for future generations. And we have been exploring a number of the solutions to address these challenges,” she said.  She noted that the wind powered Wigton Farm is now up to 38 megawatts, and the ministry is exploring the possibility of using mini hydro, as well as several other options to add to the diversification goals. In expressing satisfaction with the work of the Energy and Mining Ministry’s staff over the last two years in modernising the energy infrastructure and pursuing energy diversification, she acknowledged that the initiatives would have a long term impact on the society. “Dr. Wright has been a part of this; he has been an integral part of this, in fact, and he contributed to our national energy policy. We have an enviable policy framework, but… that’s not enough. We have to now move to implementation,” Ms. Alexander stressed Guest presenter at the lecture was Alcan Professor of Caribbean Sustainable Development, Institute for Sustainable Development, University of the West Indies (UWI), Anthony Clayton, who spoke on “The Transition to a Clean Energy Economy”. The lecture formed part of activities in observance of CARICOM Energy Week, November 6 to 12. The late Dr. Wright, who died in July after a prolonged illness, joined the then newly formed Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica Group of Companies in 1979, as Director of Exploration. He rose through the ranks to be appointed Group Managing Director in 1994, a position he held for 11 years until he was appointed Special Projects Manager. RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions TechnologyNovember 11, 2011 RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisionslast_img read more

Ryan, Sughrue reach U.S. Senior Amateur final

Ryan, Sughrue reach U.S. Senior Amateur final

first_imgST. LOUIS – Dave Ryan and Matthew Sughrue each won two matches Wednesday at Old Warson to reach the U.S. Senior Amateur final. The 62-year-old Ryan, from Taylorsville, Ill., beat Michael Dunsmore of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., 5 and 3 in the quarterfinals and topped Tim Jackson of Germantown, Tenn., 1 up in the semifinals. The 57-year-old Sughrue, from Arlington, Va., edged Doug Hanzel of Savannah, Ga., 1 up in the quarterfinals and rallied to beat Kevin Cahill of Waukesha, Wisc., in 19 holes in the semifinals. Against Jackson, Ryan won the 14th to take a 2-up lead, lost the 15th with a bogey and matched Jackson with a par-birdie-par finish to close out the match. On Tuesday in the round of 16, Ryan had the third known hole-in-one on a par 4 in USGA history. Against Cahill, Sughrue lost 15 and 16 to fall 1 down, won the 18th with a par and won the match on the 19th with another par. Sughrue also rallied against Hanzel, winning 15 and 16 to take the lead and matching Hanzel with pars on the last two holes. Sughrue left the insurance business after 25 years to go to graduate school at Virginia Tech and become a psychotherapist.last_img read more

Hold your nerve

Hold your nerve

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

PI lawyers alive to Supreme Court case on overnight care costs

PI lawyers alive to Supreme Court case on overnight care costs

first_imgPersonal injury lawyers handling clients with serious injuries will have one eye on the Supreme Court this week as the issue of care costs comes under scrutiny.Judges today heard arguments in Shannon v Rampersad and another (T/A Clifton House Residential Home, on whether care workers who stay overnight on a ‘sleep-in’ shift with injured people should be entitled to the minimum wage. The High Court ruled that one such worker from the charity Mencap, who was paid £29.05 for a shift lasting from 10pm to 7am, was entitled to be paid the minimum wage. The decision was overturned in the Court of Appeal, which said that only time spent awake and working had to be counted.Lawyers are required to factor in care costs when they negotiate settlements for clients who have suffered a serious injury. Although on the face of it the Supreme Court is deciding an employment law case, the case could be important for personal injury practitioners.Daniel Herman, partner at national firm Stewarts Law, told the Gazette the issue of sleeping night care or waking night care is one of the key factors in catastrophic injury litigation.‘Should [care worker] Ms Tomlinson-Blake’s appeal to the Supreme Court succeed, that will have significant implications in the personal injury sphere,’ said Herman.‘Claimants who require care from sleep night carers will have to pay more for each night shift and, consequently, their care claims will inevitably increase.’He added that, as a practice point, it may be worthwhile pleading any future care claim as two scenarios: one in which the status quo continues, and one in which the cost of sleeping night care increases.Mencap says it now pays the minimum wage to all overnight workers, but has described government attempts pursue employers for six years’ worth of back pay as a ‘suicide note’ for the care sector.James Sage, head of the social care team at south east firm Royds Withy King, said many providers will not have the resources to pay if the Supreme Court favours the High Court’s decision.Sage said: ‘We expect the Supreme Court to agree with the Court of Appeal decision that it was not parliament’s intention for time spent asleep to be subject to the national minimum wage. If it doesn’t there will be a lot of work and sleepless nights ahead for providers before they can finally put the issue of sleep-ins to bed once and for all.’last_img read more