Tag: 成都验证归来

Woman charged in September stabbing death

Woman charged in September stabbing death

first_img Diane Schubert A woman has been charged in connection with a September homicide that took place in South Bend.Trey Martinez was found dead on Sunday, Sept. 29. Autopsy results showed he was stabbed in the neck.RELATED: Man found dead Sunday morning in South Bend was a victim of a homicide Jason Collins was arrested for Martinez’s murder on October 16, and charged with Felony Reckless Homicide. Collins told police that Martinez was strangling him during a fight, so he stabbed him in the neck.RELATED: Man arrested in South Bend stabbing deathThen Monday, Diane Schubert, 50, was charged with Assisting a Criminal in the case.She was booked into the St. Joseph County Jail, where she remains in custody. Schubert is facing six months to two and a half years in prison. Facebook Google+ Twitter Woman charged in September stabbing death Google+ Twitter WhatsApp Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest IndianaLocalNews Facebook By Brooklyne Beatty – November 4, 2019 0 435 TAGSDiane SchuberthomicideJason CollinsseptemberSeptember 29South BendTrey Martinez WhatsApp Previous articleBBB: Walker Stalker fans are complaining about losing money to changes and cancellationsNext articleMayor Ron Meer’s Attorney Issues Statement; Asks for Special Prosecutor Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

Fastest cool-down with the Cryojet5 nitrogen jet from Oxford Instruments

Fastest cool-down with the Cryojet5 nitrogen jet from Oxford Instruments

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

By analysing data the LCS is better understanding who complains and why

By analysing data the LCS is better understanding who complains and why

first_imgOver time, a complaints handler amasses a huge amount of information. Spending a little time and energy on analysis helps gain an understanding of who complains and who they complain about. There is a common misconception that sole practitioners generate the majority of complaints. This is not true. While 44% of firms are sole practitioners and largely carry out the sort of private client work that could lead to consumer complaints, they only generate 8% of complaints received by the Legal Complaints Service. As sole practitioners employ 9% of UK solicitors, this is quite proportionate. We receive very few complaints originating from large firms, despite their employing more than 40% of solicitors in the UK. The work of these firms tends to be mainly commercial, providing us with 14% of our receipts. Most complaints by far originate from small to medium-sized firms. More than half are generated by firms with fewer than 10 partners, and nearly a quarter originated from firms with 11-25 partners. In such firms, the complaint levels are disproportionately high – for example, 15% of solicitors work in firms with 5-10 partners, and yet 27% of our complaints are generated from such firms. What we don’t know is why this is the case. The medium-sized law firm has always been the most challenging of business models, as it is often insufficiently large to support an infrastructure, but large enough for client care to be less visible. It is here where care needs to be taken. Another common preconception is that most complaints include conduct issues. Of the more than 78,000 complaints received since 2004, 73% related to poor service, with only 24% about misconduct and 3% about the bill. It supports the decision taken by the Law Society in 2006 to separate the handling of service complaints from conduct complaints – by far the majority of service complaints can be dealt with quickly and easily. A common concern of the legal profession is that most complaints are unjustified. In reality, about one-third of our complaints are not upheld (31%). Of the rest, 28% of all complaints in this period were conciliated, with a further 7% being upheld at adjudication. Until recently, the area of law generating most complaints was residential conveyancing (24%), followed by general civil law (16%), probate (10%) and matrimonial law (9.4%). However, the recession has lead to a significant drop in residential conveyancing complaints (18%), and it has been overtaken by civil complaints. While there is undoubtedly a tendency for more conveyancing transactions to be aborted, which increases the risk of a complaint, this indicates that the number of conveyancing complaints is largely proportionate to the number of transactions in the market. Our research revealed a number of gender differences: while the profile of callers who ring our helpline is 49% male and 50% female, indications are that slightly more men (55%) then choose to make the complaints formal. Moving forward with the complaint, men are slightly less likely to conciliate, and tend to have more of their complaints not upheld. The gender differences also exist with solicitors. Male solicitors are far more likely to be complained about than female solicitors – 74% of all our complaints are about male solicitors, despite them representing 56% of the profession. Once complaints are made, however, there is no disproportionality of outcome – male and female solicitors are equally likely to have complaints upheld or not upheld. We also saw a higher percentage of black and minority ethnic complainants coming to us compared with the general population. This certainly shows us to be accessible, but also raised a concern – why are there more complaints than expected? We do not know the ethnicity profile of the users of law firms, and the census data may indeed be out of date. Without further analysis, we shouldn’t assume that BME clients of law firms are more likely to have received a poor service, as it could just be a reflection of the increasing diversity of our community. Deborah Evans is chief executive of the Legal Complaints Servicelast_img read more

World War II vet gets high school diploma after 71 years

World War II vet gets high school diploma after 71 years

first_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. (CNN) It’s never too late to graduate.That’s the lesson World War II veteran Milton Mockerman shared with the Kalkaska High School class of 2017 with whom he graduated on Saturday.Mockerman, 89, received an honorary diploma from the school and participated in its graduation ceremony in Kalkaska, Michigan, fulfilling his lifelong dream of earning a high school degree — 71 years later than expected.Milton Mockerman served in the Navy during World War II. Photo via CNN.“We got a phone call from Milton Mockerman wondering if there were any classes he could take to finish his graduation,” Kalkaska High School Principal John Sattler told CNN.Sattler soon learned that Mockerman had forged his birth certificate and left high school early to join the Navy during World War II. After serving in the Navy for two and a half years, Mockerman returned home to Michigan and needed to find work. He found a few odd jobs before going to work on the railroad for 31 years.After hearing Mockerman’s story, Sattler and his secretary wanted to help the military vet accomplish his goal. They went to the board of education to ask if they could award him an honorary diploma, and the board voted unanimously to do so.“Because of his years of service in the military, we … gave him an honorary diploma,” Sattler said.Before graduating with the senior class, Mockerman spoke to a few of the high school history classes about his experiences in the war.At the graduation ceremony, Mockerman received his honorary degree and said a few words to the graduating seniors.Milton Mockerman, left, at the graduation ceremony at Kalkaska High School. Photo via CNN.I didn’t know what to say, so I just kind of told them, ‘Well, you’ve proved to me today that this high school graduating class must be smarter than I am,’” Mockerman told CNN. “Because what they took four years to do, it took me 71 years to come to that conclusion.”Mark Mockerman, Milton’s son, attended the graduation ceremony.“It was one of the greatest things I’ve seen,” Mark Mockerman told CNN. “My dad hasn’t had a lot of notoriety, and he deserves it, because he’s been the kind of dad that everyone should have had. He’s always there for me.” Published: May 30, 2017 5:30 PM EDT World War II vet gets high school diploma after 71 years SHARElast_img read more