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CU Undergraduate Projects Range From Addiction Genetics To Film Studies

CU Undergraduate Projects Range From Addiction Genetics To Film Studies

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Hundreds of University of Colorado at Boulder undergraduates are pursuing research and creative projects with faculty in 2005, ranging from studies on the genetics of addiction to producing an educational video on child trafficking in Nepal. As part of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, or UROP, junior Priyanka Thummalapally is working with Assistant Professor Marissa Ehringer of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics on a study testing the effects of running on a strain of mice that prefers to drink alcohol more than water. The mice under study have running wheels in their cages and access to both alcohol and water, Thummalapally said. The researchers have found that when the mice are allowed unlimited use of the running wheel, they tend to drink less alcohol than they normally do, suggesting human alcoholics may benefit in their recoveries by including exercise as a part of their treatment, she said. Thummalapally, who works about eight to 10 hours a week in the lab, will earn a UROP stipend of $2,000 during the 2005-06 school year for her research efforts with Ehringer. “I want to go to medical school, and doing research in a laboratory situation like this helps prepare me,” she said. “UROP is helping me to achieve my goals.” According to Ehringer, UROP does not just benefit students. “For a faculty member early in her career like me who does not yet have a lot of extramural funding, having motivated undergraduates working with me on research is beneficial,” she said. “They learn how the process of science works, and it’s helpful to my research.” Larry Boehm, assistant director of CU-Boulder’s Special Undergraduate Enrichment Programs, said the UROP program has provided more than $5 million to almost 6,000 students since it began in 1986. Standard grants to qualifying undergraduates are for up to $1,200 a semester and the work may be related to the research of a faculty member or designed by students, he said. Senior Ken Amarit is working with Film Studies Program Assistant Professor Kathleen Man, who recently produced a 50-minute feature documentary film on child trafficking in Nepal titled “Sita, a Girl from Jambu.” Based on the true story of a Nepalese girl who is kidnapped and sold into a brothel, the film is expected to debut in the coming months at one or more film festivals in North America, Europe or Asia. “The film is very compelling, which is why I’m glad to be involved in this project,” said Amarit, who is helping to produce an educational video about the global sex trade. He and three other UROP students in film studies also are creating a Web site and DVD for the project that will feature the video as well as information and photos about children who have been forced into slavery in India and elsewhere in the world. “This is a great opportunity for me,” said Amarit, an aspiring film producer who directed “The Blackout Adventure,” which tied for top honors in the Shoot Out Boulder filmmaking competition held in October. “This project has been a lot of hard work, but child trafficking is an important issue and we want to raise awareness. And this experience will definitely help me down the road when I have my own career.” Man said the UROP students have shown a lot of creativity and initiative on the project. “The students have been great, and in the end I think all of us will have produced something we are proud of. I love the whole process and the student involvement,” she said. “Although the stipends are important, we feel that the greatest benefit of UROP is the hands-on experience students acquire,” said Boehm. “The professional-level work that these undergraduates are doing with faculty enables them to distinguish themselves when applying to graduate programs or for jobs.” Other UROP projects undertaken by students in 2005 include the construction of a hybrid-fuel rocket, studies on how some stream pollutants “feminize” newborn fish, measurements of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere and a seminar on writing literature for minority children, Boehm said. Published: Nov. 16, 2005 last_img read more

Orange deputy CEO Louette set for exit

Orange deputy CEO Louette set for exit

first_imgHome Orange deputy CEO Louette set for exit Pierre Louette, an Orange Group deputy CEO (pictured), is reportedly set to leave the company after eight years.Sources told French publication La Lettre De L’expansion Louette is set to join another, as yet unnamed, company. He was appointed as CEO Stephane Richard’s number two, alongside Ramon Fernandez, in January 2016 as part of a team which consisted of five deputy CEOs at the time.Orange is yet to confirm Louette’s departure and there is no indication of a pending exit on his LinkedIn or Twitter social media profiles at this stage.Louette, who also serves as Orange group general secretary and heads up the company’s France wholesale division and Orange digital ventures unit, joined the company in 2010 as group EVP and general secretary.Aside from his everyday duties, Louette built a reputation as something of a lobbyist in the industry: in November 2017, he spoke to Mobile World Live about the need for European telecoms regulators to create an environment in the continent which favours investment. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 16 JAN 2018 Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Español Kavit Majithia Orange makes secure cloud pact for French market Relatedcenter_img Previous ArticleEricsson woes continue with $1.8B write-downNext ArticleSamsung eyes Africa earnings boost Orange Ventures injects €30M into new fund Tags Author Las grandes operadoras europeas ponen condiciones a las RAN abiertas Orangelast_img read more

McGirt tops Curran in Memorial playoff for first win

McGirt tops Curran in Memorial playoff for first win

first_imgDUBLIN, Ohio – William McGirt thought he hit it big when he won the Cabarrus Classic and pocketed $16,000, the second-largest prize on the Tar Heel Tour. That was in 2007, and it felt like a lifetime ago compared with the perks from winning the Memorial on Sunday. The victory was worth $1.53 million and a three-year exemption for a guy who once dreamed of simply having a PGA Tour card. Waiting to congratulate him was tournament host Jack Nicklaus, who raved about the bunker shot on the 18th hole that kept McGirt in the playoff at Muirfield Village, and the flop shot from behind the 18th green that led to a 6-foot putt and his first PGA Tour victory in his 165th try. U.S. Open qualifying? Take the day off. McGirt moves up to No. 43 in the world and was assured a spot in his first national championship. ”It will all sink in at some point,” McGirt said. This was a long time coming. McGirt couldn’t count all the mini-tours he played and the self-doubts he ignored, including a four-month stretch in which he saw his wife for only four days. But on Sunday against the strongest field of the year for a regular PGA Tour event, McGirt made his first victory one to remember. Memorial Tournament: Articles, photos and videos He played the final 22 holes at Muirfield Village without a bogey. His final par in regulation was the most important, a two-putt from 65 feet for a 1-under 71 that allowed him to join Jon Curran (70) in a playoff at 15-under 273. McGirt won the way Nicklaus said he captured so many of his 73 times on the PGA Tour. ”I won half of my golf tournaments watching everyone else self-destruct,” Nicklaus said. ”And that’s the way you win. I saw him coming down the stretch. I saw Jon coming down the stretch. The two of them played great. I felt that either one of them could have won.” Dustin Johnson dropped three shots in four holes to start the back nine, and a fourth bogey on the 16th ended it for him. Matt Kuchar was tied for the lead when he returned from a 90-minute rain delay and promptly hit the lip of a fairway bunker and made double bogey. He never recovered. Emiliano Grillo had a share of the lead until starting the back nine with four straight bogeys. Gary Woodland couldn’t get up and down behind the 17th green and made bogey. Curran, who knows Nicklaus from being a member at his Bear’s Club in South Florida, looked like a winner when he hit 7-iron out of a fairway bunker on the 17th hole to 7 feet for birdie to join McGirt at 15 under. McGirt was battling his swing and trying to hang on. He saved par from a bunker on the 17th. He had the long two-putt for par on the 18th hole. And he was in trouble on the 18th in a playoff, facing a deep bunker shot to a back pin. He expertly used the slope behind the hole and watched his shot roll back to a few feet to stay alive. ”That was a long bunker shot,” Nicklaus said. ”I don’t want to hit it again,” McGirt replied. Playing the 18th for the third time, Curran misjudged the strong wind at his back and went into the gallery above the green, and his pitch ran down the slope well past the hole, leading to bogey. McGirt also went long and played a perfect flop shot to 6 feet for the winner. ”Surprisingly, I felt no nerves standing over that putt and poured it right in the middle,” McGirt said. Johnson finished alone in third – his fifth finish in the top 5 this season – while Rory McIlroy (68) tied for fourth with Kuchar (73), Woodland (73) and J.B. Holmes (69). Jason Day, a Muirfield Village member and No. 1 in the world, got to within two shots of the lead until he tumbled to a 74 and tied for 27th, matching his best result at the Memorial. Jordan Spieth shot 73 and finished 12 shots behind in a tie for 57th. McGirt became the third straight Memorial champion to become a first-time PGA Tour winner, and it was the third straight playoff at Muirfield Village. In his 12 years as a pro, he has played only one major, the 2012 PGA Championship. That was meaningful, even though he missed the cut, because he was coming off a close call at the Canadian Open in which he didn’t look at the leaderboard the final round. He ran into Tiger Woods, told him what he did, and he said Woods told him he was foolish for not looking. McGirt didn’t make that mistake twice. And when it was over, his name was at the top. The U.S. Open is now on his schedule. So is the PGA Championship at the end of July, and the Masters next April. ”I wondered for years if I would ever get to the PGA Tour,” McGirt said. ”And then once you get out here, OK, you’ve played 160 events. Are you ever going to win? But I think you have to get your nose bloodied some to learn how to handle it, and I definitely had my nose bloodied a few times.”last_img read more

Cllr. initiates major clampdown on dog fouling in Strabane

Cllr. initiates major clampdown on dog fouling in Strabane

first_img Google+ Cllr. initiates major clampdown on dog fouling in Strabane By News Highland – April 10, 2018 WhatsApp FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Harps come back to win in Waterford News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+center_img Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR A Strabane Councillor is initiating a clamp down on dog fouling, urging people to report instances directly to the Council. A dog owner who does not pick up their pets foul can be fined £80 yet the issue is reportedly still prevalent in Strabane and surrounding area.Local Cllr Patsy Kelly says the community need to play a part in catching those responsible.He says while the fine should act as a deterrent, people have a role to play in reporting irresponsible dog ownership:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/patsysdasdadogfoul.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleGardai warn of people being targeted after making cash withdrawalsNext articleToday marks 20 years since Good Friday Agreement News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

Clinicians override most medication safety alerts

Clinicians override most medication safety alerts

first_imgComputer-based systems that allow clinicians to prescribe drugs electronically are designed to automatically warn of potential medication errors, but a new study reveals clinicians often override the alerts and rely instead on their own judgment.The study, led by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), suggests that most clinicians find the current medication alerts more of an annoyance than a valuable tool. The authors conclude that if electronic prescribing is to effectively enhance patient safety, significant improvements are necessary. The study’s findings appear in the Feb. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.“Electronic prescribing clearly will improve medication safety, but its full benefit will not be realized without the development and integration of high-quality decision support systems to help clinicians better manage medication safety alerts,” said the study’s senior author, Saul Weingart, vice president for patient safety at Dana-Farber and an internist at BIDMC.The researchers reviewed the electronic prescriptions and associated medication safety alerts generated by 2,872 clinicians at community-based outpatient practices in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania to learn how clinicians responded to the alerts.The clinicians submitted 3.5 million electronic prescriptions between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30, 2006. Approximately one in 15 prescription orders, or 6.6 percent, produced an alert for a drug interaction or a drug allergy. The vast majority of the 233,537 alerts (98.6 percent) were for a potential interaction with a drug a patient already was taking.Clinicians overrode more than 90 percent of the drug interaction alerts and 77 percent of the drug allergy alerts. Even when a drug interaction alert was rated with high severity, clinicians typically dismissed those for medications commonly used in combination to treat specific diseases. They also were less likely to accept an alert if the patient had previously been treated with the medication.The high override rate of all alerts, the researchers contend, suggests that the utility of electronic medication alerts is inadequate, adding that for some clinicians, most alerts “may be more of a nuisance than an asset.”“The sheer volume of alerts generated by electronic prescribing systems stands to limit the safety benefits,” said Thomas Isaac of BIDMC and Dana-Farber and the paper’s first author. “Too many alerts are generated for unlikely events, which could lead to alert fatigue. Better decision support programs will generate more pertinent alerts, making electronic prescribing more effective and safer.”Although the study analyzed orders generated on only one electronic prescribing system, PocketScript, the researchers say their observations are relevant to other systems because the alerts they reviewed were typical and were generated by a commercial database, Cerner Multum, used by other electronic prescribing systems.Based on these findings, Weingart and his colleagues offer several recommendations to improve medication safety alerts, including reclassifying severity of alerts, especially those that are frequently overridden; providing an option for clinicians to suppress alerts for medications a patient already has received; and customizing the alerts for a clinician’s specialty. The research team identified a list of potentially dangerous drug interactions based on those alerts that most often changed the clinicians’ decision to prescribe. This list is available at http://www.dana-farber.org/electronic-medication-safety.“We need to find a way to help clinicians to separate the proverbial wheat from the chaff,” said Weingart. “Until then, electronic prescribing systems stand to fall far short of their promise to enhance patient safety and to generate greater efficiencies and cost savings.”In addition to Weingart and Isaac, the paper’s other authors are Joel Weissman, Executive Office of Health and Human Services, Massachusetts; Roger Davis, BIDMC; Daniel Sands, BIDMC and Cisco Systems, San Jose, Calif.; Michael Massagli, PatientsLikeMe Inc., Cambridge, Mass.; and Adrienne Cyrulik, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Boston.last_img read more

The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling

The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling

first_imgThe Atlantic:When an English archaeologist named George Smith was 31 years old, he became enchanted with an ancient tablet in the British Museum. Years earlier, in 1845, when Smith was only a five-year-old boy, Austen Henry Layard, Henry Rawlinson, and Hormuzd Rassam began excavations across what is now Syria and Iraq. In the subsequent years they discovered thousands of stone fragments, which they later discovered made up 12 ancient tablets. But even after the tablet fragments had been pieced together, little had been translated. The 3,000-year-old tablets remained nearly as mysterious as when they had been buried in the ruins of Mesopotamian palaces.An alphabet, not a language, cuneiform is incredibly difficult to translate, especially when it is on tablets that have been hidden in Middle Eastern sands for three millennia. The script is shaped triangularly (cuneus means “wedge” in Latin) and the alphabet consists of more than 100 letters. It is used to write in Sumerian, Akkadian, Urartian, or Hittite, depending on where, when, and by whom it was written. It is also an alphabet void of vowels, punctuation, and spaces between words.Even so, Smith decided he would be the man to crack the code. Propelled by his interests in Assyriology and biblical archaeology, Smith, who was employed as a classifier by the British Museum, taught himself Sumerian and literary Akkadian.Read the whole story: The Atlantic More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more