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Creative Chronicles: How to become a programmer

Creative Chronicles: How to become a programmer

first_imgCreative Chronicles: How to become a programmerThe GI.biz Academy partners with Creative Assembly to publish its Creative Chronicles video series, today focusing on becoming a programmerCreative AssemblyMonday 16th March 2020Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleCreative AssemblyCreative Assembly’s educational series, Creative Chronicles, provides in-depth tutorials, insights into game development and key information that aims to educate and inspire future talent interested in building games. Previously covered topics include AI behaviour and a balancing post-mortem of Total War Three Kingdoms. You can find the list of all the previously published videos on this page.In this video, Creative Assembly’s senior AI programmer, Duygu Cakmak, and engine director, Chris Budd, look at how to become a programmer in the games industry.Have you been wondering how to get into the industry, or you’ve been applying for junior programming positions and not had much luck? In this talk, CA discuss what key skills you need to show, how you can best present your skills in a portfolio and your application, as well as what to avoid. There are simple changes you can make in your application which will help you stand out, and ensure the hiring managers don’t miss the important information.CA also looks at the next stage of the application process: what happens when you get an interview and what might a programming test involve?This talk is for anyone looking at taking that step into the industry and how to stand out from a crowd of other candidates.CA’s programming experts have also collated a list of useful resources, which you can find below. They also recommend #Include C++, a group who are working to improve inclusion and diversity in the C++ community. #Include have a discord server and channels for learners to ask any questions.Books:Game Programming Patterns by Robert NystromGame AI Pro 1-2-3 by Steve RabinBehavioral Mathematics for Game AI by Dave MarkArtificial Intelligence and Games by Georgios N. Yannakakis and Julian TogeliusThe Audio Programming Book by R BoulangerComputer Animation: Algorithms and Techniques by Rick ParentGame Engine Architecture by Jason GregoryReal Time Rendering by Tomas Akenine-Möller, Eric Haines, Naty HoffmanGPU Gems – All Volumes by various authorsGame Programming Gems – All Volumes by various authorsRay Tracing Gems by Eric Haines, Tomas Akenine-MöllerNumerical Recipes by William H. Press, Saul A. Teukolsky, et alPhysically Based Rendering: From Theory to Implementation by Matt Pharr, Greg Humphreys, Wenzel JakobContinuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation by Jez Humble and David FarleyThe Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. NormanBlogs:The Orange Duck by Daniel HoldenWhere to Get Started Learning C++ and What Resources to Use by Shafik YaghmourC0DE517EMicrosoft Developer Blogs: DirectX, C++ and PIXThe GamesIndustry.biz Academy guides to working in games cover a wide range of topics, from how to approach mental health issues in the workplace to what every studio head can do to stop their business from failing. Our guides to finding a job in the games industry cover sectors such as journalism, PR, design, testing and art.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesCreative Assembly opens third UK studioTotal War developer continues growth with Horsham, West Sussex officeBy Jeffrey Rousseau 29 days agoA Total War Saga: Troy was downloaded 7.5m times in 24 hoursEpic Games Store giveaway brought a huge number of players “new and old” into Creative Assembly’s new gameBy Matthew Handrahan 8 months agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Courts strained by foreclosure filings

Courts strained by foreclosure filings

first_img Courts strained by foreclosure filings Senior EditorStatistics show a stark increase in the number of mortgage foreclosures around Florida, hobbling the state’s court system that is already dealing with deep budget cuts. “We have the perfect storm,” said 19th Circuit Chief Judge William Roby. “We have a bad economy, we have higher caseloads from the bad economy in criminal cases, we have cases going up in family and domestic violence because people are under stress, and we have foreclosure cases going up.“It’s a serious problem, number one because it’s affecting people, but it’s also serious from a time management standard,” he continued on the rising foreclosure numbers. Noting that court staff, particularly case managers, have been cut, Roby added, “Judges are acting more like clerks than they are decision-makers. We’re spending more time reviewing files [for completeness] and doing clerical type work than deciding cases.”It’s not a minor issue for Roby. In 2004-05, there were 499 foreclosures filed in St. Lucie County, which is part of the 19th Circuit. That increased 14-fold by 2007-08, according to figures from the Office of the State Courts Administrator, or 7,335. From 2005-06 to 2006-07 filings more than tripled. Then for 2007-08, they more than tripled again.Or consider Lee County.In 2007, not in any one month did the number of foreclosures filed reach 2,000. In fact, for the first six months, they didn’t even reach 1,000. So far in 2008, no month has had as few as 2,000 foreclosures, and for the first nine months the total has already surpassed the 2007 tally.Most judges contacted for this story say they are keeping up. But that’s largely because most foreclosures aren’t being contested, as well as some courts are adopting rules to streamline the process, including ensuring that defendants get adequate notification and perhaps even help if they want to save their homes.According to OSCA figures, Lee and St. Lucie counties are the most extreme examples in the state, with foreclosure filings up 1,052.6 percent and 1,427.1 percent respectively since the 2004-05 fiscal year. Most other counties have seen sharp increases, as well.Miami-Dade County has seen filings rise 373.6 percent to 40,549 for 2007-08; in Broward it’s been 463.5 percent, or 33,920 filings. Hillsborough has seen a 279.4 percent hike to 16,436 cases, while Orange County has seen a 360.6 percent rise to 18,977 cases. Of the state’s major metropolitan areas, Duval County has seen the smallest increase, but even there, cases have more than doubled to 8,623 for the 2007-08 fiscal year. The Duval County Clerks Office, though, said for the 2008 calendar year, 9,031 cases had been filed as of mid-October, up from 6,840 for all of 2007, indicating a worsening foreclosure situation.Overall, the OSCA figures give a statewide foreclosure filing explosion of 374.5 percent, or growth from 59,907 in 2004-05 to 284,263 in 2007-08.Perhaps the number shouldn’t be surprising. A study by the Mortgage Brokers Association for the second quarter of 2008 showed 6 percent of all Florida residential properties were in foreclosure. A recent St. Petersburg Times story found that 40 percent of those who purchased homes since 2003 had mortgages that exceed the value of their homes. In nearby Pasco County, that figure was 60 percent.By and large, while chief circuit judges report that their courts are dealing with the foreclosure onslaught, the sheer numbers are straining their resources.“It hasn’t really affected our ability to handle cases,” said Judge James Carlin, the civil administrative judge in the 20th Circuit who oversees cases in Collier County, noting, however, that meeting the demands has required the allocation of additional resources and judges’ time. (Collier County, like Lee, is in the 20th Circuit. While Collier has had more than a nine-fold increase in foreclosures since 2004-05, its total number of filings is only about a quarter of Lee County’s.)Collier cases are filed through a central scheduling staffer, Carlin said, and then divvied up among four of five civil judges, who do around 50 summary judgment hearings as part of their Monday regular motion calendars. In addition, there’s a special Friday calendar presided over by a senior judge who handles around 300 cases per session, Judge Carlin said. He noted Lee County has used magistrates to keep up with its foreclosure load.In December, Carlin said the courts will add a full-day session presided over by one of the civil judges to help move the influx of cases along. Critical to the success of the process, Judge Carlin added, is that the court system still has enough support staff so “all of our files are reviewed prior to entry of any judgment to make sure it’s appropriate for the judge to sign the final judgment.”Eighteenth Circuit Chief Judge Clayton D. Simmons reported a different situation, first noting that foreclosures have increased more than 800 percent in his circuit.“This has placed a significant demand on the clerk as well as court staff,” Judge Simmons said. “Simply processing this many case files is physically daunting, much less screening them for proper status when calls are made to schedule them for hearing.“In Seminole County, we lost a county-funded case manager whose primary job was to process foreclosure cases, prepare dockets, and assist the court in conducting the actual foreclosure case hearings — placing long-distance calls to attorneys, preparing checklists for each case to ensure status, etc. Without her services, the remaining staff and our JAs were simply overwhelmed. In addition, we detected that the increased volume had overwhelmed the firms that specialize in foreclosures and their work product had declined, and there was virtually no communication between the lender, or the lender’s counsel, and the property owner. We were having eight to 10 property owners show up every week at summary judgment hearings saying they had been trying to communicate with the lender to save their property but had had no success in speaking to anyone,” Simmons said.In the Second Circuit, Chief Judge Charles Francis said foreclosure cases have more than doubled in the past two years, and now account for about 45 percent of the civil docket, or an estimated 2,378 cases for 2008. So far, that’s being handled by splitting up the load between Francis, two other civil judges, and one judge who spends half-time with a civil docket.“We’re not as bad as a lot of circuits” he said. “Where we hurt is increased filings at a time we’ve lost resources to deal with them.”The circuit used to have a four-person mediation staff, which would have done much of the casework, but that’s down to one person, and case managers have also been cut.“We don’t have anybody to check those files [for completeness] and it’s up to the judges and the JAs to do that, and that’s where the load is being felt,” Francis said.Nick Sudzina, court administrator for the 10th Circuit, said foreclosures are up 118.5 percent since 2002, and are being handled both on regular motion dockets and in special hearings. He noted Chief Judge J. David Langford goes to Highlands County once a month just to have foreclosure hearings.“There is no undue delay in getting a mortgage foreclosure hearing set in the 10th Circuit, and we are confident that any further increase in foreclosure filings will not constitute a crisis in our circuit,” Sudzina said. “It is believed in the 10th Circuit, Polk County in particular, will continue to see a spike in the number of foreclosure cases filed. We believe we have the resources necessary to withstand the onslaught of filings.”In the 15th Circuit, which has seen a nearly 800 percent increase since 2004-05, Chief Judge Kathleen Kroll said the first eight months on 2008 have seen more foreclosures (18,264) filed than for all of 2007. That has meant that three judges have been assigned foreclosure cases, instead of one who did foreclosures in addition to other civil cases, Kroll said.“The judicial caseload modification means that other circuit civil cases, including trials, are likely to face delays due to the judicial time being spent presiding over foreclosures,” she said.In Duval County, Judge Charles Mitchell, who oversees foreclosures, said, “It’s about to become a burden, but it’s not right now. The reason I say it’s about to become a burden is we handle them very quickly now.“Most of the foreclosures I have seen, the great majority of them, have involved adjustable rate mortgages. People might have been able to pay, but they didn’t see any future in paying it,” he said. “Most now have been people who bought too much home. I think people are starting to lose their jobs, and if the economy gets worse, then they’ll start losing their homes.”That, Mitchell said, could change the foreclosure landscape as more homeowners might contest their foreclosures. That brings up another point mentioned by most judges. The vast majority of foreclosures are unopposed, judges say, with fewer than 5 or 10 percent of defendants showing up in court or attempting to save their homes. Many who show up have been frustrated by being unable to contact anyone representing the mortgage-holder to attempt to work out a solution. When that happens, Judge Francis said he typically orders the two sides to meet in his courtroom.Carlin, in Collier, said a sizeable chunk of the foreclosures there involve vacant land in planned developments, bought by investors who also walked away when values dropped.Responses to spiking foreclosure filings vary around the state. Judge Kroll in October signed what may be the most detailed foreclosure administrative order. Those filing foreclosures must comply with several factors, including that the property owner has been given the name of someone “who has the authority to rework or otherwise modify the existing loan.” It also requires that information be collected from the mortgagors, and that no summary judgment will be granted until the plaintiff responds to that information. It also allows for short sales and provides that either party may request mediation at any time.Judge Mitchell said Duval County requires that plaintiffs have local counsel, a reaction to mortgage-holders having sent in paperwork and filing fees and expecting judicial assistants or court clerks to do filing and other upkeep work. With the cut in court resources, that doesn’t work, so lawyers have to handle those details, he said.The circuit is also requiring that defendants, when notified of a foreclosure, be given a phone number that links them to a legal aid clearinghouse which can connect defendants to volunteer lawyers. Mitchell said that program was organized by Jacksonville attorney Sam Jacobson, who assembled a panel to help distressed homeowners.In the Fifth Circuit’s Citrus County, an administrative order entered two years ago requires that when plaintiff’s attorneys will be appearing by phone, the notice of sale, final disposition form, and all documents must be received by the court 10 days before the hearing. The order also includes restrictions on when and how final orders can be modified. Carlin said in the 20th, plaintiffs are required to have local counsel so high volumes can be handled quickly.In the Second Circuit, Francis said plaintiff’s lawyers are required to at least appear by telephone for the final summary judgment hearing.Judges say the foreclosure crisis is not affecting the courts’ handling of criminal cases, since by law such matters have priority. But they say it is affecting other civil cases.“Litigation in other areas has not only increased, but has become more time-consuming,” said Fifth Circuit Chief Judge Daniel Merritt. “Attorneys involved in lengthy, complicated litigation in medical malpractice, nursing home negligence, product liability, and other similar areas are frequently asking for jury trials anticipated to last from three to six weeks.“As overburdened as the court system currently is, it is almost impossible for a judge to take six weeks out of a normal work schedule and set it aside for a lengthy jury trial; yet those litigants are also entitled to their day in court, and it must be done,” Merritt continued.“Court dockets are so full that it often takes several weeks to get a hearing; and lengthy jury trials must be scheduled several months in advance. While caseloads and workloads continue to increase at lightning speed, support staff numbers have been drastically cut and the number of judges has remained stagnant.. . . Even as the eventual volume of foreclosures decreases, without adequate and appropriate judicial branch staffing and funding, delays in justice will continue.”Said Judge Roby: “We have to triage and do the best we can. That’s going to be oriented toward criminal. If someone files a motion for a speedy trial, we’re hearing that case. That’s why we need the help of the business community to let our legislators know we need our resources to do our job.. . . At some point in time, we’re going to have a massive amount of judicial burnout.” November 1, 2008 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Courts strained by foreclosure filingslast_img read more

| Sandeep Warrier to play ball for Tamil Nadu

| Sandeep Warrier to play ball for Tamil Nadu

first_imgKottayam: Kerala cricketer Sandeep Warrier is moving to Tamil Nadu. He will play for Tamil Nadu in the next Ranji Trophy season. Sandeep’s plea to move to Tamil Nadu was approved by the Kerala Cricket Association. .Sandeep Warrier was the main bowler of the Kerala Ranji team. Sandeep Warrier is in the process of trying to prepare a better team under former Indian pacer Tinu John. “I have no problems with the team and I am leaving my good relationship,” the actor said. .Sandeep Warrier got a job at India Cements last year. This is how I moved to Tamil Nadu. This will help to train the MRF Pace Foundation. .Sandeep played 57 first-class matches for Kerala and took 186 wickets. Sandeep Warrier’s performance in Ranji Semi-Final for the first time in the history of Kerala in the 2018-19 season was 44 wickets. .Sandeep Warrier hails from Thrissur and has played for India A teams. He was part of the Kolkata Knight Riders in the Indian Premier League. With the retirement of Indian cricketer Laxmipathy Balaji, the pace of Tamil Nadu has come to a halt. AdvertisementFree Matrimony here at Kerala Matrimony Register!last_img read more

Official: Espanyol confirm wage cuts of 70 percent due to coronavirus

Official: Espanyol confirm wage cuts of 70 percent due to coronavirus

first_img “Those affected have been informed and have shown their understanding and respect, which the club is grateful for in these complicated moments. The measures affect the players and coaches working with the men’s and women’s first teams, Espanyol B and the U19s and U17s. The measures request a reduction to the working week of 70 percent.”  sport.es In a statement, Espanyol confirmed that they would be applying ERTEs to the club’s playing staff to the tune of 70 percent of their salaries.  The economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic continue to be seen across the board in Spanish football. Barcelona became the first La Liga club to announce wage cuts on Thursday, with local rivals Espanyol following their lead on Friday.  “RCD Espanyol,  as a consequence of the temporary suspension of competitions and the exceptional situation we are going through, have presented to the relevant authorities the necessary paperwork to apply ERTEs due to force majeure. Said request has been filed unilaterally for reasons of urgency and responsibility,” the club said.  CET Upd. at 13:54 center_img The club add that the players have been very understanding and that they remain hopeful of reaching an agreement with the players which would avoid them having to follow through with the ERTEs.  27/03/2020 Oficial: El Espanyol presenta un ERTE IN SPORT.ES Espanyol have so far announced six cases of coronavirus at the club, including four first team players.last_img read more

Birds of a feather

Birds of a feather

first_imgBy sports editor Russell Bennett The boys at the Seagulls’ nest at Tooradin know they may not even get the chance to run out just after 2pm on a Saturday this season.They know that a call on whether or not there will even be a community footy season is out of their control.But last week their return to training wasn’t so much about preparing for a possible 2020 campaign.It was more about an incredibly tightknit group of mates banding together, once again, as a collective.Even standing out on the same field once again – albeit while practicing physical distancing – meant the world to them.“For us, we have no control over what happens – whether there’s a 2020 season or not,” Tooradin Dalmore senior football coach Lachie Gillespie told the Gazette.“The only thing we’ve got control over is providing somewhere for our players and the rest of our club people to come to.“As restrictions continue to gradually wind back, that’ll become easier.“At the moment it’s pretty strict, but even having smaller groups and allowing our footballers and netballers to catch up face-to-face again – that’s what we’re focusing on at the moment.“It’s super important for our people and their mental health that they can reconnect, and obviously maintaining physical health through exercise is important regardless of if we can actually play footy and netball this year or not.”Football and netball clubs mean so much more to their people, and their communities, than the few hours of play each Saturday.“For your grandparents, your husbands or wives, and even your kids who aren’t even playing football or netball yet – the connection a club like ours provides means everything,” Gillespie said.“It drives the community. We’ve always known that, but this situation we’ve all found ourselves in has delivered a real reminder of it.“What’s really hurt us is that we haven’t been able to be together over this really challenging period.”Tooradin-Dalmore is one of the tightest knit community sporting clubs anywhere in Gippsland, and its people just want to be able to wrap their arms around each other again – at least metaphorically, while physical distancing measures remain in place.“We’re training so we’re ready to go in case the season does start up, but it’s more about us being such a close group of mates and we just want to maintain that connection with each other,” Gillespie explained.“It’s good for our people, it’s good for our club, and it’s good for our community.”Moving forward, as the restrictions change and more information continues to come to hand, the Gulls will continue to adapt and roll with the punches.It’s all they can do.“If West Gippy shuts down for the season we’ll readjust, but at the moment we’re training two nights per week and we’ve got the flexibility to really turn this situation into a positive for us,” Gillespie said.“Personally, I’m looking for ways for us to continue to have that camaraderie and culture of togetherness whether we can return to the field and the court on the weekends or not.“Something that’s really held us together in recent times has been our character and grit in the face of some really difficult periods.“That’s toughened us up, and it’s almost helped form part of our DNA. People who come to our club really feel that connection to each other, and that buy-in that a lot of the really, really good clubs in our community have.“Seeing people’s faces and having a laugh has been great.“To be honest, we might just be one of the most ruthless clubs in West Gippy in terms of how we pay out on each other, but it’s great fun being back together again.”During the week, the Gulls reformed at both ‘The Nest’ at the Tooradin Recreation Reserve, and also just down the highway at Rutter Park.It was in smaller groups, but it was a start.“You play sport for that connection, ultimately,” Gillespie said.“It’s for connection, and for an outlet for those times each week that we’re together. It’s a release for all of us.“It could be four degrees outside and hailing down, but when you’re together you can look back on those times as some of the best you’ve had.”last_img read more