Tag: 昆山水磨

Thousands more pupils to benefit from cadet programme

Thousands more pupils to benefit from cadet programme

first_imgThousands more pupils to benefit from cadet programme Thousands of pupils in schools all over England will benefit from life skills that set them up for success as adults through a new £1.1 million investment to expand cadet units in schools.Education Secretary Gavin Williamson has announced the expansion today (Friday 2 April), to increase capacity in existing state school-based cadet units in England, giving more pupils the opportunity to build important skills such as resilience, self-discipline, teamwork and leadership skills.Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said:The values of our Armed Forces – those of resilience, perseverance, and teamwork – are the same that we want to instil in all our young people. These are skills that will serve pupils both now and well into adulthood.As we move out of national lockdown and back to normality, we want to make sure that children have a balance between academic and extra-curricular activities to set them back on track towards excellent futures. The cadets programme will widen extra-curricular activities available to disadvantaged children, as well as boost a culture of self-discipline in schools.The success of the programme since its launch in 2012, leading to 500 units in schools, is testament to a strong partnership between schools and the Armed Forces in enriching pupils’ skill set and extending a culture of discipline in education to other areas of a young person’s life, including extra-curricular activities.The boost to the Cadet Expansion Programme (CEP) builds on the Government’s support for children’s wellbeing as they make the transition back to the classroom, as well as its £1.7 billion investment in programmes targeted at young people who may benefit from additional help with academic, social or emotional skills.The joint Ministry of Defence and Department for Education programme (CEP) originally launched in 2012 with a target of creating 100 cadet units in state secondary schools in England, which was later boosted to having 500 units in UK schools by April 2020 due to the success of the programme.Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:I thoroughly welcome the expansion of the Cadet Units in schools. This is about giving pupils the opportunity to develop a range of important skills beyond academic learning, teaching resilience, leadership and working as a team.The scheme was introduced by the Government to increase the numbers of units which could equip young people with unique skills and experiences which can help them in day-to-day life.Research has shown the cadets offers a range of benefits to individuals and the wider community, including:Increased an individual’s belief in their ability to complete specific tasksImproved their motivation;Improved school attendance which leads to better behaviour and attitudes;May lead to greater academic success which can contribute to increasing social mobility.Today’s announcement reaffirms the Government’s support for achieving the ambition of having 60,000 cadets in school units, and delivers on the Education Secretary’s commitment to support School Staff Instructors (SSI) in Combined Cadet Forces (CCFs) in state schools in England to sustain cadet units in schools, which in turn will assist with the growth of cadet numbers, ensuring that many more young people benefit from what cadets offer. Funding will go directly to schools to employ School Staff Instructors.The announcement to expand cadet units in schools and develop “soft skills” in children and young people during the pandemic, builds on the Government’s £1.7 billion investment in recovery support to help tackle the impact of any lost learning and physical time in school during the pandemic. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:community, Defence, disadvantaged, education, Government, Investment, leadership, mobility, research, resilience, secondary school, Secretary, UK, UK Government, Wallace, wellbeinglast_img read more

VSECU members donate $23,000 to local charities

VSECU members donate $23,000 to local charities

first_imgVermont State Employees Credit Union,Vermont Business Magazine VSECU, a member-owned cooperative and not for profit credit union for everybody who lives or works in Vermont, is donating $23,000 to Vermont charities through its member-directed, charitable giving program, We Care 2. More than 4,600 VSECU members allocated the earmarked funds by casting votes for one of five charitable organizations that impact issues of food, shelter, heat, environment, or financial education for Vermonters.“At VSECU, we believe in using our strength as a cooperative to leverage change on a number of levels: financial, environmental, and social. When we take care of our neighbors, it improves the quality of life for all Vermonters,” said Simeon Chapin, director of social and community development at VSECU. “The We Care 2 program empowers all of our members to make a positive impact on our communities by directly supporting the organizations they value, and helping them continue the work they do.”Each year, the We Care 2 program receives applications from qualifying charities across the state. VSECU’s Giving Committee chooses five finalists that demonstrate a commitment to meeting the essential needs of all Vermonters. The five 2018 finalists were Blue Star Mothers of Vermont, Charter House Coalition, Community Harvest of Central Vermont, Mercy Connections, and Prevent Child Abuse Vermont. During VSECU’s Annual Elections process, members had the opportunity to cast a vote for their favorite organization.We Care 2 funds were distributed based on the percentage of votes each charity received. As directed by VSECU members, the charities received the following We Care 2 funds:Blue Star Mothers of Vermont(link is external) received $4,922 to provide support to veterans, active military, and the families of our fallen through services such as financial/emergency assistance for utilities, food, rent, gas, vehicle repairs, homemade meals delivered to veteran housing, and a pet program. The pet program offers pet fostering, veterinary service assistance, free use of comfort dogs and cats, and a service-dog program.Charter House Coalition(link is external) received $1,410 to directly support the critical emergency shelter needs of homeless individuals in Addison County through individual and family shelters, which can provide emergency shelter for up to 20 individuals and five families. The number of individuals and families being served has nearly doubled from last year, increasing the need to ensure appropriate overnight awake staffing, bedding, nutritious meals, facilities, and basic hygiene materials.Community Harvest of Central Vermont(link is external) received $5,703 to add an additional staff member, which will allow CHCV to increase the quantity of donated, recovered food by moving surplus from areas of the state with excess to others with more need, such as Washington County.Mercy Connections(link is external) received $2,088 to enhance their education offerings and financial literacy efforts. Through several different initiatives, people will acquire the skills and access programs that will result in bank-ready business plans, reduced debt, increased financial literacy, increased confidence and motivation, earnings, and a much-needed sense of belonging and community.Prevent Child Abuse Vermont(link is external) received $8,877 for its Nurturing Parenting Programs, which bring participant families together for a nutritious meal. The funds would be used to buy food for the meals for the 50-plus Nurturing Parenting Programs held each year.Linda Johnson, executive director of We Care 2’s top vote-getter, Prevent Child Abuse Vermont, said, “We cannot thank VSECU’s members enough for supporting organizations working with vulnerable populations across our state. Prevent Child Abuse Vermont will use these special dollars to purchase food for nutritious meals served to participating families attending Nurturing Parenting Programs throughout Vermont. This support is truly needed and deeply appreciated.”To learn more about We Care 2 and the winning organizations, visit www.vsecu.com/wecare2(link is external).About VSECUVSECU is a member-owned cooperative and not for profit credit union for everybody who lives or works in Vermont, offering a full range of affordable financial products and services to its member-owners. VSECU is committed to improving the lives of Vermonters by empowering the possibilities for greater social, environmental, and financial prosperity. For more information about VSECU, call 802/800 371-5162 or visit www.vsecu.com(link is external)Source: VSECUlast_img read more

Islands of housing within a green sea

Islands of housing within a green sea

first_imgWe urgently need to put in place the structures that would enable a world city of London’s status and size to organise and meet its own needs. The starting point would be the recognition that the footprint of the capital extends far beyond its presently defined boundaries. As has been revealed in recent debates at The London Society on this topic, allowing the widely acknowledged success of the green belt to become an excuse for inaction is not helpful. By way of an illustration of this conflict, Surrey’s Campaign to Protect Rural England’s 10-point manifesto for the past election has as its top two priorities:1) Protect the green belt and other countryside and green spaces in Surrey from inappropriate development.2) Oppose excessive and unsustainable house building – especially where demand arises from outside the county.Is it reasonable to exclude the demand for housing from outsiders when unquestionably the much smaller population of Surrey rely heavily on London for other aspects of their lives, and not least for employment? We fail to challenge the conflation of policies to protect the natural environment with nimbyism at our peril. The confusion creates a taboo which makes it so much harder to develop an inspiring vision for how Londoners and their neighbours can share the natural and economic wealth that surrounds them.Such a vision was hinted at by Professor Peter Bishop of UCL in his contribution to a London Society debate on 5 February 2015. The relationship between London and the green belt, the GLA and the home counties should not be seen in terms of a polarised debate between city and country dwellers on whether to build homes in the green belt or to prevent this, come what may. Bishop argued that there is surely a way that we can both protect and enhance the green belt as one of the country’s (rare) planning successes, at the same time as meeting the housing and other needs of the capital.London has a duty to offset the environmental impact of its growing populationAs engineer Alan Baxter pointed out at the London Society debate on the future of the Green Belt, London’s phenomenal economic success generates all kinds of challenging demands apart from the commonly expressed requirements for housing and transport infrastructure: leisure, recreation,biodiversity, animal and plant husbandry, health, and psychological wellbeing can all be obtained from our relationship with the green belt if we protect it and invest in it appropriately. The question is how to think of the built and unbuilt footprint of the capital in such a way as to enhance the sustainable wellbeing of humankind and the natural environment at the same time.We should thus reaffirm our commitment to protect and enhance the Green Belt with a new charter that enables investment in its natural resources. The CPRE and other protagonists are apt to view criticism of the quality of countryside as a Trojan horse for development interests. But in any event it’s not acceptable to put up with the examples of rural degradation that are often cited as reasons for doing away with it: the scruffy fields of rusty containers, the monocultural agri-business, the failing golf courses. London has a duty to offset the environmental impact of its growing population. We must invest in biodiversity to bring back the stag beetles, hawk moths, hedgehogs and other species whose populations have collapsed during my lifetime. At the same time we should harness the opportunity for human well-being by improving access to and appreciation of the natural environment. An audit of the capacity of London’s unbuilt land would reveal different degrees of suitability for environmental enhancement.The London Society undertook such an exercise almost a century ago and published its conclusions in London of the Future, under the editorship of Sir Aston Webb in 1921.  In David Barclay Niven’s chapter, we read: “On the inner edge of this belt the ragged fringe of London could be neatly finished off with groups of new and seemly buildings — particularly where the great arterial roads cut across the green and enter London — both officially and actually. As it is, the town spills itself untidily and indefinitely out along the main roads, making a dismal trailing-off transition that is barely complete before the first ‘free town’ is reached. The London Society has prepared a detailed map showing how this great, green mantle might yet be thrown protestingly about the capital — the satellite towns and garden cities clinging about its outer hem.”Achieving a negligible carbon footprint demands design that encourages collective behaviour, sharing in the creation and consumption of resources and the disposal of waste. This principle of engagement impacts on the design of the new development in such a way as to facilitate social interaction between residents, the landscape which is subject to communal husbandry and the relationship with the surrounding countryside, in a hugely improved connectivity between the built environment with green fingers and cycleways as the physical manifestation of a new relationship between people and the natural environment.So we have been thinking for a century about improving the relationship between London’s built footprint and its rural context for a century, and since long before town and country planning was even invented.  Now that we have had the benefit of planning for more than half that time, now that we understand so much more about the need to minimise and mitigate our impact on the environment, and now that London’s population is growing at the rate of 300 people every day – surely we should be debating an appropriate redefinition of the interface between town and country.  Of course we should examine whether a new boundary should be a concentric enlargement, alignment with transport infrastructure to create green wedges, or isolated islands within a green sea – why would we not?Ben Derbyshire is managing partner of HTA Designlast_img read more

APIL chief demands equality for bereaved

APIL chief demands equality for bereaved

first_imgThe president of the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers has called for equality between jurisdictions over bereavement damages.Speaking at APIL’s autumn conference earlier this week, John Spencer, chairman and director of Spencers Solicitors, said he wanted to see more people who were bereaved in England, Wales and Northern Ireland receive the same respect, compassion and flexibility as bereaved people in Scotland.Only spouses and civil partners of a person killed through someone else’s negligence, or the parents of a deceased child under the age of 18, are entitled to bereavement damages – £12,980 in England and Wales, and £11,800 in Northern Ireland.‘In Scotland, bereavement damages are based on proper consideration of the closeness of relatives to the deceased to ensure payments are fair,’ Spencer said.‘Scottish law clearly has no difficulty recognising the closeness of children to deceased parents or the dependency of other relatives on the deceased.’He added: ‘Why should a bereaved child in Newcastle receive no compensation to help cope with the loss of a parent when a bereaved child living a few miles north, across the border, receives the help he or she needs?’last_img read more