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Linkin Park’s New album Takes a Heavier Turn

Linkin Park’s New album Takes a Heavier Turn

first_imgShinoda notes that fans shouldn’t expect this to be the heaviest album of all-time of any band. This is just the heaviest and loudest Linkin Park album to date.-Brittney Borruso www.facebook.com/rockstella[via Rolling Stone] Linkin Park’s new album The Hunting Party comes out June 17th, followed by their tour with 30 Seconds to Mars. What we can expect is a heavier metal sound that pays homage to the aritsts that inspired nu-metal.Mike Shinoda says on the direction of this album,“We need to weed out a lot of the soft, emo kind of approach to our music, and we need to weed out anything that feels aggressive for aggressive’s sake. We’re not 18-year-old kids making a loud record – we’re 37-year-old adults making a loud record. And what makes a 37-year-old angry is different than what made us angry back in the day.”Shinoda realizes that commercially, this direction might be challenging, but he believes in his music. Fed up with the indie music available now, he turned to the music that predated his band and inspired him to begin it. “I was thinking, what albums predated nü-metal,” he says. “Without these albums there wouldn’t have been Linkin Park.”Not only did he draw inspiration from these bands, Refused, Helmet and At the Drive-In, to name a few, he invited them onto the new album. Page Hamilton, vocalist of Helmet appears on “All for Nothing,” System of a Down guitarist Daron Malakian provides some guest riffs on “Rebellion” and rap icon Rakim appears on “Guilty All the Same.” Shinoda discusses how the teaming up with Rakim occurred,“I got on the phone with Rakim and explained our M.O. and told him how rock music has gone in this direction that we, at this moment, don’t feel comfortable following. He responded by telling me how his experience in hip-hop has been similar. Because rap music is so poppy, he can’t see himself making those kinds of records. It was at that moment, we realized we had a lot in common and I knew the song was gonna work.”last_img read more

Waitress Alum Joe Tippett to Reunite with Jessie Mueller in TV Movie Patsy & Loretta

Waitress Alum Joe Tippett to Reunite with Jessie Mueller in TV Movie Patsy & Loretta

first_img View Comments Broadway alum Joe Tippett, who originated the role of Earl in the out-of-town production of Waitress, will appear opposite former co-star Jessie Mueller in the upcoming Lifetime movie Patsy & Loretta, according to Deadline. Kyle Schmid (Six) is also newly announced to join the cast of the previously reported film, co-starring Megan Hilty.In addition to his out-of-town and later Broadway turns in Waitress, Tippett was seen on Broadway in Airline Highway. His off-Broadway credits include This Day Forward, Indian Summer, Familiar and Ashville. He most recently appeared on the small screen in Rise.Patsy & Loretta follows the untold friendship between music stars Patsy Cline (Hilty) and Loretta Lynn (Mueller), leading up to Cline’s untimely death in a 1963 plane crash. Tippett will portray Doolittle “Mooney” Lynn, Loretta’s husband, with Schmid as Charlie Dick, Patsy’s second husband.The TV movie will be filmed on location in Nashville, with a premiere scheduled for late 2019. Joe Tippett(Photo: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com)last_img read more

Salmonella decline seen in food poisoning report

Salmonella decline seen in food poisoning report

first_imgNEW YORK | The government’s latest report card on food poisoning shows a dip in salmonella cases but an increase in illnesses from bacteria in raw shellfish. The report counts cases in only 10 states for some of the most common causes of foodborne illness, but is believed to be a good indicator of national food poisoning trends. Highlights from Thursday’s report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:WHAT’S MAKING US SICK?Salmonella remains at the top of the chart, far ahead of most other foodborne germs. Only campylobacter (camp-ee-loh-bak-tur) — a bacteria commonly linked to raw milk and poultry — comes close. Other causes, listeria, shigella (shih-GEHL’-uh) and E. coli, trail behind.IS FOOD POISONING GETTING WORSE?Overall, no. Last year, there were no significant changes in most kinds of food poisoning, compared to the previous three years. The new report tallied about 20,000 illnesses and 80 deaths in the 10 states, similar to previous years. The CDC estimates that 1 in 6 Americans get sick from contaminated food each year, though most cases are not reported.ANY GOOD NEWS?Yes, for salmonella. The rate of new cases dropped 9 percent — the biggest drop in about a decade. But officials are cautious about making too much of it, since it was compared to a time period that included a big outbreak linked to eggs in 2010. Last year’s rate is similar to what it was about five years ago. CDC officials hope new regulatory proposals, like one to prevent salmonella in chicken parts, will keep pushing rates down.WHAT ABOUT BAD NEWS?There was in increase in infections from vibrio (VIB’-ree-oh) bacteria found in raw shellfish, like oysters. Last year, cases were up 32 percent from the previous three years and 75 percent from about five years ago. But the numbers remain very small — only 242 of the 20,000 illnesses recorded in the 10 states. Climate change is warming coastal waters in some places, and that may be helping spread some vibrio strains to new locations, said Dr. Robert Tauxe, a CDC food-germ expert. “The warmer the water, the more vibrio,” he said. A strain traditionally found in the Pacific Northwest, is now showing up along the East Coast. Tauxe said it might have been spread through water in ships’ ballast tanks.HOW CAN YOU PREVENT FOOD POISONING?Carefully wash and clean food, and cook meat, poultry and eggs thoroughly. Avoid raw milk and unpasteurized juices. Promptly refrigerate leftovers. A government report last year showed leafy greens like lettuce and spinach were the leading source of food poisoning, and produce in general accounted for nearly half of all illnesses. There were slightly more deaths attributed to poultry than to vegetables in the decade studied.Online:Food safety: https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Mercedes–Benz Junior Golf Championships kick off this month

Mercedes–Benz Junior Golf Championships kick off this month

first_imgThe 11th Mercedes-Benz Junior Golf Championships, which start this month will continue the trend of promoting both golfing skills and educational excellence.  This season, golfers will be awarded extra bonus points for educational grades. The winners from the Masters Final will go to on compete in an international junior golf tournament overseas, except for those in the 23 year and under class, where the winners will compete in a Thailand PGA Tour event.The first qualifying round of the Championship will be held on 15-16 September at Royal Hills, Nakorn Nayok.  There are a total of 4 age categories for boys and girls; 12 years and under, 14 years and under, 17 years and under and 23 years and under.For a full list of the scheduled dates and courses or for more information, contact Pentangle Promotions Co., Ltd. on 02-311-3414-5 or go to website www. pentanglepromotions.com.last_img read more

Maroons avoid relegation

Maroons avoid relegation

first_imgBy Nick Creely DDCA TURF 1, 2 AND 3 REVIEW – ROUND 14 TURF 1 While much of the attention of the final…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Birds of a feather

Birds of a feather

first_imgBy sports editor Russell Bennett The boys at the Seagulls’ nest at Tooradin know they may not even get the chance to run out just after 2pm on a Saturday this season.They know that a call on whether or not there will even be a community footy season is out of their control.But last week their return to training wasn’t so much about preparing for a possible 2020 campaign.It was more about an incredibly tightknit group of mates banding together, once again, as a collective.Even standing out on the same field once again – albeit while practicing physical distancing – meant the world to them.“For us, we have no control over what happens – whether there’s a 2020 season or not,” Tooradin Dalmore senior football coach Lachie Gillespie told the Gazette.“The only thing we’ve got control over is providing somewhere for our players and the rest of our club people to come to.“As restrictions continue to gradually wind back, that’ll become easier.“At the moment it’s pretty strict, but even having smaller groups and allowing our footballers and netballers to catch up face-to-face again – that’s what we’re focusing on at the moment.“It’s super important for our people and their mental health that they can reconnect, and obviously maintaining physical health through exercise is important regardless of if we can actually play footy and netball this year or not.”Football and netball clubs mean so much more to their people, and their communities, than the few hours of play each Saturday.“For your grandparents, your husbands or wives, and even your kids who aren’t even playing football or netball yet – the connection a club like ours provides means everything,” Gillespie said.“It drives the community. We’ve always known that, but this situation we’ve all found ourselves in has delivered a real reminder of it.“What’s really hurt us is that we haven’t been able to be together over this really challenging period.”Tooradin-Dalmore is one of the tightest knit community sporting clubs anywhere in Gippsland, and its people just want to be able to wrap their arms around each other again – at least metaphorically, while physical distancing measures remain in place.“We’re training so we’re ready to go in case the season does start up, but it’s more about us being such a close group of mates and we just want to maintain that connection with each other,” Gillespie explained.“It’s good for our people, it’s good for our club, and it’s good for our community.”Moving forward, as the restrictions change and more information continues to come to hand, the Gulls will continue to adapt and roll with the punches.It’s all they can do.“If West Gippy shuts down for the season we’ll readjust, but at the moment we’re training two nights per week and we’ve got the flexibility to really turn this situation into a positive for us,” Gillespie said.“Personally, I’m looking for ways for us to continue to have that camaraderie and culture of togetherness whether we can return to the field and the court on the weekends or not.“Something that’s really held us together in recent times has been our character and grit in the face of some really difficult periods.“That’s toughened us up, and it’s almost helped form part of our DNA. People who come to our club really feel that connection to each other, and that buy-in that a lot of the really, really good clubs in our community have.“Seeing people’s faces and having a laugh has been great.“To be honest, we might just be one of the most ruthless clubs in West Gippy in terms of how we pay out on each other, but it’s great fun being back together again.”During the week, the Gulls reformed at both ‘The Nest’ at the Tooradin Recreation Reserve, and also just down the highway at Rutter Park.It was in smaller groups, but it was a start.“You play sport for that connection, ultimately,” Gillespie said.“It’s for connection, and for an outlet for those times each week that we’re together. It’s a release for all of us.“It could be four degrees outside and hailing down, but when you’re together you can look back on those times as some of the best you’ve had.”last_img read more