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Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, December 15, 2020

first_img Electric Picnic Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, December 15, 2020 Pinterest Electric Picnic Twitter Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival WhatsApp Pinterest Home Deaths Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, December 15, 2020 Deaths TAGSDeaths in Laois Twitter By LaoisToday Reporter – 15th December 2020 center_img Due to current government legislation regarding public gatherings, the house will remain private. A private funeral will take place for family only in St. Joseph’s Church Mountmellick, on Wednesday at 11am with interment afterwards in St. Joseph’s Cemetery. The mass can be viewed on the parish webcam.Eileen Ryan (née Drennan)Newtown, Durrow, LaoisEileen passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family. Beloved wife of Patrick. Sadly missed by her loving family Marian (Holland), Eilish (McDermott), John, Connie (Grogan), Audrey (Ryan), sons in law, Liam, Peter, PJ and Stephen, daughter in law Jane, brother in law, sisters in law, grandchildren, great grandchildren, relatives, neighbours, and friends.May she Rest In PeaceIn accordance with government guidelines Eileen’s funeral Mass and burial will be private to family only. House strictly private please.Noel CarrollBallykaneen, Clonaslee, LaoisNoel Carroll, Ballykaneen, Clonaslee, Co. Laois. Died on the 14th of December 2020, peacefully following a long illness bravely borne. Predeceased by his father Pat. Dearly loved son of Phil. He will be sadly missed by his sorrowing family, Pat, Anne Marie, Evelyn and Edmund, sisters-in-law Anne and Geraldine, brothers-in-law John and James, nieces Emma and Bronagh, nephews Pauric, Declan, Gearóid, James, Sean and Jarleth, aunts, uncles, cousins, relatives, work colleagues, neighbours and friends.May Noel Rest in PeaceDue to Covid-19 restrictions and by adhering to government guidelines, a family Funeral Mass will take place for Noel’s family members, on Wednesday in St. Manman’s Church, Clonaslee, at 2pm, followed by burial afterwards in St. Manman’s Cemetery, Clonaslee.People are welcome to stand along the route to the church, in the churchyard and in the cemetery with social distancing being observed at all time.Noel’s Funeral Mass can be viewed on www.mcnmedia.tv under Clonaslee Parish.Noel’s family would like to thank everyone for their understanding and support at this difficult time. If you wish to offer your condolences to the Carroll family, you may do so in the Condolence Section below.Agnes Shaw (née Bolger)5 Bridge St, Graiguecullen, CarlowAgnes Shaw (nee Bolger) of 5 Bridge St and formerly of 11 Church St, Graiguecullen, Carlow, passed away peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, on December 13th, 2020, at The District Hospital, Carlow.Beloved wife of the late Liam, much loved mother of Ann, Leigh, Anthony, Phil, Maryclare and Sandra.She will be sadly missed by her loving son, daughters, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, sons-in-law, daughter-in-law,brothers Noel and Joe, sister Annette and Clare, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nephews, nieces, relatives and friends.Due to government advice regarding public gatherings a private funeral will take place for family and close friends in St. Clare’s Church, Graiguecullen, on Wednesday at 11am and will be followed by burial in St Mary’s Cemetery, Carlow.Agnes’s Funeral Mass can be viewed on St Clare’s Church, online streaming service by using the following link.http://www.graiguecullenkilleshin.com/Eileen Ryan (née Drennan)Newtown, Durrow, LaoisEileen passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family. Beloved wife of Patrick. Sadly missed by her loving family Marian (Holland), Eilish (McDermott), John, Connie (Grogan), Audrey (Ryan), sons in law, Liam, Peter, PJ and Stephen, daughter in law Jane, brother in law, sisters in law, grandchildren, great grandchildren, relatives, neighbours, and friends.In accordance with government guidelines Eileen’s funeral Mass and burial will be private to family only. House strictly private please. Offers of condolence can be made below.SEE ALSO – Deaths in Laois – Monday, December 14, 2020 Facebook Facebook Previous articleELECTED: Laois County Board for 2021 confirmed following online conventionNext articleLaois native steps down from Down position following All-Ireland camogie win LaoisToday Reporter Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Below are the recent deaths in Laois.Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam.Maura Flanagan (née Phelan)Patrick Street, Mountmellick, LaoisMaura Flanagan (nee Phelan), Patrick Street, Mountmellick and late of Ballyfin, after a short illness borne with grace and acceptance. Peacefully, at home, surrounded by her loving family, predeceased by her husband Willie and her son in law Tom Major. Much loved mother of Florence (Fennelly), Mary (Major), Patricia (O’Brien), Frances (Connolly), Olivia (Coughlan) and William. Sadly missed by her loving children, brother Martin, daughter in law, Anne, sons in law, Tom, David, Sean, and Liam, and her adored grandchildren, extended family, neighbours and friends. Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Electric Picnic WhatsApplast_img read more

Southern Power, Turner Renewable Buy Solar Power Project

Southern Power, Turner Renewable Buy Solar Power Project

first_img Avista considering RNG on way to net-zero carbon goals 2.15.2016 TAGSSDEGSouthernCompany Voith Hydro supplying pumped storage equipment to pair with Idaho combined solar-wind project Southern Power (NYSE: SO) and Turner Renewable Energy jointly acquired a 20-MW solar power plant in California from Solar Frontier Americas. The Calipatria Solar Facility is expected to use 130,000 CIS thin-film solar modules. DEPCOM Power is providing engineering, procurement and construction services. Construction began in August 2015, and commercial operation is scheduled for first quarter 2016. The project is Southern Power’s 10th facility in California and its 25th renewable facility overall. No posts to display The project has a 20-year power purchase agreement with San Diego Gas & Electric Co. Linkedin RenewablesNew ProjectsSolar By chloecox – center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Linkedin Southern Power, Turner Renewable Buy Solar Power Project Facebook Previous articleWalter Energy Sells Coal Assets in W. Virginia & AlabamaNext articleMajor Work and Testing Completed at Nuclear Power Project chloecox Facebook Twitter Renewable project management firm Bradley acquired by Bureau Veritas last_img read more

Soulive Welcomes Danny Mayer, James Casey & More For “Family Night” On Final Night Of Bowlive VIII [Video]

Soulive Welcomes Danny Mayer, James Casey & More For “Family Night” On Final Night Of Bowlive VIII [Video]

first_imgOn Saturday night, Soulive completed their six-night Bowlive residency at Brooklyn Bowl with a special “Family Night” performance featuring help from a number of familiar guests.Related: Soulive Welcomes George Porter Jr. For Penultimate Bowlive VIII Performance In Brooklyn [Videos]After kicking things off with “Revolution”, “Bubble”, and “Spark”, the core Soulive trio—comprised of keyboardist Neal Evans, drummer Alan Evans, and guitarist Eric Krasno—welcomed up saxophonist and former band member and longtime collaborator Sam Kininger to augment a rendition of Doin’ Something track “Hurry Up.. and Wait”. “Rudy’s Way” and “Liquid” followed before the quartet beefed up their horn section with the addition of trombonist Brian Thomas for a set-closing “Tuesday Night Squad”.When the trio returned for set two, they were joined by guitarist Danny Mayer, the current Star Kitchen guitarist who played alongside Krasno in his short-lived Eric Krasno Band. With the added second axe at their disposal, Soulive worked through “Curse Lifter” and a particular searing rendition of their arrangement of Jimi Hendrix classic, “Manic Depression”. From there, Alan Evans welcomed the three-piece horn section of Kininger, Thomas, and saxophonist James Casey (Trey Anastasio Band) to join in with the Mayer-supplemented quartet for a funky run through “Backwards Jack”. Mayer exited the stage for renditions of “Up Right” and “Hat Trick”, which gave each member of the guest horn section a chance to shine with a solo.While Bowlive is beloved for its consistent bevy of guests, it was the band’s core members who shined the brightest in the brilliant “PJ’s” that followed as Krasno took the Brooklyn Bowl crowd on an extended, jaw-dropping guitar odyssey while Neal and Alan built a lush sonic foundation underneath him. The horns added some sparse accompaniment but were a mere afterthought on this one, as Krasno and the Evans brothers affirmed one last time why they’re the baddest house band around. Finally, the band fired off one last “Cannonball” before welcoming Mayer and the full three-piece horn section back to the stage for a “Flurries” encore. Setlist: Soulive | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 7/20/19Set One: Revolution, Bubble, Spark, Hurry Up… and Wait^, Rudy’s Way^, Liquid^, Tuesday Night Squad^%Set Two: Curse Lifter*, Manic Depression*, Backwards Jack*^%, Up Right^%, Hat Trick^%, PJ’s^%, Cannonball^%Enc: Flurries*^%Notes:^with Sam Kinninger (sax)*with Danny Mayer (guitar)%with James Casey (sax) and Brian Thomas (trombone)last_img read more

More than 52,000 have signed up for health care, state says

More than 52,000 have signed up for health care, state says

first_imgby Morgan True vtdigger.org Nearly 80 percent of Vermonters who the state estimated needed to sign up for health insurance before January 1 have picked a plan, according to the Shumlin administration.But it’s unclear how many of the close to 23,000 people who signed up for individual or family coverage through the Vermont Health Connect website have had their applications processed. It’s also unknown how many of those whose applications were processed have made a payment as the January 7 payment deadline looms.New applications and payments are constantly being processed, making it hard to pin down figures for either, Mark Larson, commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Access, said Thursday.An additional 29,200 people signed up for coverage through their employer thanks to changes made in November to the health care exchange rollout.The remaining 13,000 of the 65,000 Vermonters who are required by state law to sign up fall into three categories ‘ individuals on private plans, individuals on VHAP or Catamount, and people receiving coverage through a small business employer whose plans have yet to expire.The open enrollment period was extended for three months in November, giving people in any of those categories until March 31 to sign up for coverage.‘Let’s all remember, while the clock does turn down (the night of Dec. 31) for folks who want to take advantage of federal subsidies for January, you can keep signing up for February and March, April, May,’ Gov. Peter Shumlin told reporters Monday, ‘so, obviously, we’ve got the year ahead.’The most important thing for individuals who have already selected a plan and received an invoice is to make a payment before the Jan. 7 deadline, otherwise they won’t be eligible for coverage until February, Larson said.‘We remain confident that Vermonters who get their coverage through a small business employer won’t experience a gap in coverage during the open enrollment through March,’ Larson said.His department did not have figures for how many people who picked a plan through the exchange have been processed to this point, or how many of those who had have made a payment.For individuals and families who have coverage that extends into 2014, the expiration of that coverage is considered a qualifying event, and they will have the opportunity to sign up before the 15th of the month in which their coverage expires in order to be covered for the following month.Employers who have coverage that continues into 2014 will have an open enrollment period for employees 60 days prior to the expiration of their current plan.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont has signed up 14,000 Vermont workers directly through an employer, and almost all of them have policy numbers and insurance cards, said Kevin Goddard, vice president of internal affairs for Blue Cross.The state’s largest insurer has also received 3,000 applications that were processed through the exchange, and many of those people have also received their policy numbers and insurance cards, Goddard said. Nearly 12,000 individuals signed up for plans with Blue Cross through the exchange, according to figures the company was given by the state, Goddard said.Anyone who had Blue Cross insurance in 2013 is still in the company’s system, so if they’ve signed up for 2014, but go to the emergency room before the state processes them, they would still show up as insured, Goddard said.A spokeswoman with MVP, the other insurance provider on the exchange, said in a statement that due to the November contingency options implemented by the state, the company could not provide an ‘accurate membership count.’Larson did not know how many previously uninsured Vermonters had signed up through the exchange. That’s because the applications don’t ask what people’s coverage was before, he said.Asked the same question about the number of uninsured Vermonters earlier this week, Shumlin responded, ‘If it’s gettable, we’ll get it.’The state’s data on the uninsured typically comes from the annual household survey conducted by the Department of Financial Regulation, Larson said. That survey is typically conducted in the fall.That means it could be as long as nine months before the state has figures on how many newly insured Vermonters there are as a result of the Affordable Care Act.One of the main objectives of the state’s health care exchange is to improve Vermonters’ access to affordable medical insurance.PHOTO: Governor Peter Shumlin and Department of Vermont Health Access Commissioner Mark Larson field questions about the state’s new health care exchange in Montpelier. Photo by Andrew Stein/VTDiggerlast_img read more

Courts strained by foreclosure filings

Courts strained by foreclosure filings

first_img Courts strained by foreclosure filings Senior EditorStatistics show a stark increase in the number of mortgage foreclosures around Florida, hobbling the state’s court system that is already dealing with deep budget cuts. “We have the perfect storm,” said 19th Circuit Chief Judge William Roby. “We have a bad economy, we have higher caseloads from the bad economy in criminal cases, we have cases going up in family and domestic violence because people are under stress, and we have foreclosure cases going up.“It’s a serious problem, number one because it’s affecting people, but it’s also serious from a time management standard,” he continued on the rising foreclosure numbers. Noting that court staff, particularly case managers, have been cut, Roby added, “Judges are acting more like clerks than they are decision-makers. We’re spending more time reviewing files [for completeness] and doing clerical type work than deciding cases.”It’s not a minor issue for Roby. In 2004-05, there were 499 foreclosures filed in St. Lucie County, which is part of the 19th Circuit. That increased 14-fold by 2007-08, according to figures from the Office of the State Courts Administrator, or 7,335. From 2005-06 to 2006-07 filings more than tripled. Then for 2007-08, they more than tripled again.Or consider Lee County.In 2007, not in any one month did the number of foreclosures filed reach 2,000. In fact, for the first six months, they didn’t even reach 1,000. So far in 2008, no month has had as few as 2,000 foreclosures, and for the first nine months the total has already surpassed the 2007 tally.Most judges contacted for this story say they are keeping up. But that’s largely because most foreclosures aren’t being contested, as well as some courts are adopting rules to streamline the process, including ensuring that defendants get adequate notification and perhaps even help if they want to save their homes.According to OSCA figures, Lee and St. Lucie counties are the most extreme examples in the state, with foreclosure filings up 1,052.6 percent and 1,427.1 percent respectively since the 2004-05 fiscal year. Most other counties have seen sharp increases, as well.Miami-Dade County has seen filings rise 373.6 percent to 40,549 for 2007-08; in Broward it’s been 463.5 percent, or 33,920 filings. Hillsborough has seen a 279.4 percent hike to 16,436 cases, while Orange County has seen a 360.6 percent rise to 18,977 cases. Of the state’s major metropolitan areas, Duval County has seen the smallest increase, but even there, cases have more than doubled to 8,623 for the 2007-08 fiscal year. The Duval County Clerks Office, though, said for the 2008 calendar year, 9,031 cases had been filed as of mid-October, up from 6,840 for all of 2007, indicating a worsening foreclosure situation.Overall, the OSCA figures give a statewide foreclosure filing explosion of 374.5 percent, or growth from 59,907 in 2004-05 to 284,263 in 2007-08.Perhaps the number shouldn’t be surprising. A study by the Mortgage Brokers Association for the second quarter of 2008 showed 6 percent of all Florida residential properties were in foreclosure. A recent St. Petersburg Times story found that 40 percent of those who purchased homes since 2003 had mortgages that exceed the value of their homes. In nearby Pasco County, that figure was 60 percent.By and large, while chief circuit judges report that their courts are dealing with the foreclosure onslaught, the sheer numbers are straining their resources.“It hasn’t really affected our ability to handle cases,” said Judge James Carlin, the civil administrative judge in the 20th Circuit who oversees cases in Collier County, noting, however, that meeting the demands has required the allocation of additional resources and judges’ time. (Collier County, like Lee, is in the 20th Circuit. While Collier has had more than a nine-fold increase in foreclosures since 2004-05, its total number of filings is only about a quarter of Lee County’s.)Collier cases are filed through a central scheduling staffer, Carlin said, and then divvied up among four of five civil judges, who do around 50 summary judgment hearings as part of their Monday regular motion calendars. In addition, there’s a special Friday calendar presided over by a senior judge who handles around 300 cases per session, Judge Carlin said. He noted Lee County has used magistrates to keep up with its foreclosure load.In December, Carlin said the courts will add a full-day session presided over by one of the civil judges to help move the influx of cases along. Critical to the success of the process, Judge Carlin added, is that the court system still has enough support staff so “all of our files are reviewed prior to entry of any judgment to make sure it’s appropriate for the judge to sign the final judgment.”Eighteenth Circuit Chief Judge Clayton D. Simmons reported a different situation, first noting that foreclosures have increased more than 800 percent in his circuit.“This has placed a significant demand on the clerk as well as court staff,” Judge Simmons said. “Simply processing this many case files is physically daunting, much less screening them for proper status when calls are made to schedule them for hearing.“In Seminole County, we lost a county-funded case manager whose primary job was to process foreclosure cases, prepare dockets, and assist the court in conducting the actual foreclosure case hearings — placing long-distance calls to attorneys, preparing checklists for each case to ensure status, etc. Without her services, the remaining staff and our JAs were simply overwhelmed. In addition, we detected that the increased volume had overwhelmed the firms that specialize in foreclosures and their work product had declined, and there was virtually no communication between the lender, or the lender’s counsel, and the property owner. We were having eight to 10 property owners show up every week at summary judgment hearings saying they had been trying to communicate with the lender to save their property but had had no success in speaking to anyone,” Simmons said.In the Second Circuit, Chief Judge Charles Francis said foreclosure cases have more than doubled in the past two years, and now account for about 45 percent of the civil docket, or an estimated 2,378 cases for 2008. So far, that’s being handled by splitting up the load between Francis, two other civil judges, and one judge who spends half-time with a civil docket.“We’re not as bad as a lot of circuits” he said. “Where we hurt is increased filings at a time we’ve lost resources to deal with them.”The circuit used to have a four-person mediation staff, which would have done much of the casework, but that’s down to one person, and case managers have also been cut.“We don’t have anybody to check those files [for completeness] and it’s up to the judges and the JAs to do that, and that’s where the load is being felt,” Francis said.Nick Sudzina, court administrator for the 10th Circuit, said foreclosures are up 118.5 percent since 2002, and are being handled both on regular motion dockets and in special hearings. He noted Chief Judge J. David Langford goes to Highlands County once a month just to have foreclosure hearings.“There is no undue delay in getting a mortgage foreclosure hearing set in the 10th Circuit, and we are confident that any further increase in foreclosure filings will not constitute a crisis in our circuit,” Sudzina said. “It is believed in the 10th Circuit, Polk County in particular, will continue to see a spike in the number of foreclosure cases filed. We believe we have the resources necessary to withstand the onslaught of filings.”In the 15th Circuit, which has seen a nearly 800 percent increase since 2004-05, Chief Judge Kathleen Kroll said the first eight months on 2008 have seen more foreclosures (18,264) filed than for all of 2007. That has meant that three judges have been assigned foreclosure cases, instead of one who did foreclosures in addition to other civil cases, Kroll said.“The judicial caseload modification means that other circuit civil cases, including trials, are likely to face delays due to the judicial time being spent presiding over foreclosures,” she said.In Duval County, Judge Charles Mitchell, who oversees foreclosures, said, “It’s about to become a burden, but it’s not right now. The reason I say it’s about to become a burden is we handle them very quickly now.“Most of the foreclosures I have seen, the great majority of them, have involved adjustable rate mortgages. People might have been able to pay, but they didn’t see any future in paying it,” he said. “Most now have been people who bought too much home. I think people are starting to lose their jobs, and if the economy gets worse, then they’ll start losing their homes.”That, Mitchell said, could change the foreclosure landscape as more homeowners might contest their foreclosures. That brings up another point mentioned by most judges. The vast majority of foreclosures are unopposed, judges say, with fewer than 5 or 10 percent of defendants showing up in court or attempting to save their homes. Many who show up have been frustrated by being unable to contact anyone representing the mortgage-holder to attempt to work out a solution. When that happens, Judge Francis said he typically orders the two sides to meet in his courtroom.Carlin, in Collier, said a sizeable chunk of the foreclosures there involve vacant land in planned developments, bought by investors who also walked away when values dropped.Responses to spiking foreclosure filings vary around the state. Judge Kroll in October signed what may be the most detailed foreclosure administrative order. Those filing foreclosures must comply with several factors, including that the property owner has been given the name of someone “who has the authority to rework or otherwise modify the existing loan.” It also requires that information be collected from the mortgagors, and that no summary judgment will be granted until the plaintiff responds to that information. It also allows for short sales and provides that either party may request mediation at any time.Judge Mitchell said Duval County requires that plaintiffs have local counsel, a reaction to mortgage-holders having sent in paperwork and filing fees and expecting judicial assistants or court clerks to do filing and other upkeep work. With the cut in court resources, that doesn’t work, so lawyers have to handle those details, he said.The circuit is also requiring that defendants, when notified of a foreclosure, be given a phone number that links them to a legal aid clearinghouse which can connect defendants to volunteer lawyers. Mitchell said that program was organized by Jacksonville attorney Sam Jacobson, who assembled a panel to help distressed homeowners.In the Fifth Circuit’s Citrus County, an administrative order entered two years ago requires that when plaintiff’s attorneys will be appearing by phone, the notice of sale, final disposition form, and all documents must be received by the court 10 days before the hearing. The order also includes restrictions on when and how final orders can be modified. Carlin said in the 20th, plaintiffs are required to have local counsel so high volumes can be handled quickly.In the Second Circuit, Francis said plaintiff’s lawyers are required to at least appear by telephone for the final summary judgment hearing.Judges say the foreclosure crisis is not affecting the courts’ handling of criminal cases, since by law such matters have priority. But they say it is affecting other civil cases.“Litigation in other areas has not only increased, but has become more time-consuming,” said Fifth Circuit Chief Judge Daniel Merritt. “Attorneys involved in lengthy, complicated litigation in medical malpractice, nursing home negligence, product liability, and other similar areas are frequently asking for jury trials anticipated to last from three to six weeks.“As overburdened as the court system currently is, it is almost impossible for a judge to take six weeks out of a normal work schedule and set it aside for a lengthy jury trial; yet those litigants are also entitled to their day in court, and it must be done,” Merritt continued.“Court dockets are so full that it often takes several weeks to get a hearing; and lengthy jury trials must be scheduled several months in advance. While caseloads and workloads continue to increase at lightning speed, support staff numbers have been drastically cut and the number of judges has remained stagnant.. . . Even as the eventual volume of foreclosures decreases, without adequate and appropriate judicial branch staffing and funding, delays in justice will continue.”Said Judge Roby: “We have to triage and do the best we can. That’s going to be oriented toward criminal. If someone files a motion for a speedy trial, we’re hearing that case. That’s why we need the help of the business community to let our legislators know we need our resources to do our job.. . . At some point in time, we’re going to have a massive amount of judicial burnout.” November 1, 2008 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Courts strained by foreclosure filingslast_img read more

Segro and Aviva land DHL at Heathrow

Segro and Aviva land DHL at Heathrow

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Jelly-legged runners sprint up Tower 42

Jelly-legged runners sprint up Tower 42

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

First-look: see Michael Sheen as Chris Tarrant in ITV and AMC’s Quiz

First-look: see Michael Sheen as Chris Tarrant in ITV and AMC’s Quiz

first_imgThe first image has been released of Michael Sheen as Chris Tarrant in Quiz coming to ITV and AMC next year.The image recreates the famous shot of Tarrant arriving to give evidence at the Ingram trial at Southwark Crown Court in March 2003 which will be seen in the drama.Quiz tells the extraordinary and sensational story of how Charles and Diana Ingram attempted an ‘audacious heist’ on the quiz show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?Major Ingram, his wife Diana and an accomplice, Tecwen Whittock, who was sitting in the audience, were accused of cheating their way to a million pounds on what was, the most popular game show on earth in 2001. The couple stood trial for conspiring by coughing during the recording to signify the correct answers to the multiple choice questions posed to the Major by host, Chris Tarrant.Quiz is a three-part drama directed by Stephen Frears (A Very English Scandal, Florence Foster Jenkins, Philomena, The Queen) and written by playwright, James Graham, (Brexit: An Uncivil War, Ink, This House, Labour of Love).The cast includes Matthew Macfadyen stars as Major Charles Ingram, Michael Sheen as TV presenter, Chris Tarrant, Sian Clifford as Diana Ingram, Mark Bonnar as Celador Television Chairman, Paul Smith, Helen McCrory as Sonia Woodley QC, Michael Jibson as Tecwen Whittock and Aisling Bea as ITV Entertainment Commissioner, Claudia Rosencrantz.Quiz is a Left Bank Pictures co-production for ITV and AMC and is distributed by Sony Pictures Television.last_img read more

Djokovic spoke again about the disqualification

Djokovic spoke again about the disqualification

first_imgWorld No. 1 Novak Djokovic said he could not guarantee he would not make the same mistake that led to his disqualification at the US Open after inadvertently hitting a line judge with a ball, but would do his best to avoid a repeat of the incident.The Serbian was expelled from the US Open in the fourth round after involuntarily hitting a line-up as a sign of disappointment after losing a game at the end of the first set with Pablo Carenho Busta from Spain. Nole’s blow hit the woman’s throat and caused her to fall to the ground. Djokovic said he advised the injured line judge to see a doctor after the Flushing Meadows incident. “It’s not like thunder from a clear sky. I can’t promise or guarantee that I won’t do something like this in my life. I will do my best, obviously, but in life anything is possible, “he said at today’s press conference before the start of the Masters in Rome. After the incident, tournament organizers confirmed that Djokovic was fined $ 250,000, the prize pool he won for reaching the quarterfinals.The 33-year-old tennis player was fined an additional $ 10,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. “The rules are clear. I accepted them and had to move on. That’s exactly what I did, “he finished number 1 in the world. Djokovic will rest in the first round in the Italian capital as number 1, and in the second he will face the winner of the pair Tennis Sandgren and Salvatore Caruso. / BGNESlast_img read more