Tag: 杭州2019最新桑拿

Stratford softball outlasts Loyal/Granton

Stratford softball outlasts Loyal/Granton

first_imgTigers win third game in a rowBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterSTRATFORD — The Stratford softball team won its third-straight game, downing Loyal/Granton 5-1 in a nonconference tilt Tuesday at Hilgemann Field.Lorrie Luepke threw a complete-game two-hitter for the Tigers (3-1). She struck out three, walked three, and gave up just one run, that scored in the third inning by the Greyhounds (0-3).Brittany Bredemann went 2-for-3 with two doubles and a pair of RBIs to lead the Stratford offense.Stratford hosts Wisconsin Rapids Assumption in a Marawood Conference South Division game Friday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Tigers 5, Greyhounds 1Loyal/Granton 001 000 0 – 1 2 2Stratford 030 110 x – 5 7 1WP: Lorrie Luepke. LP: Rowley.SO: Rowley 2; Luepke 3. BB: Rowley 1; Luepke 3.Top hitters: L, Parker 2B; Morgan Reinwand 2B, RBI. S, Brittany Bredemann 2×3, 2 2Bs, 2 RBIs; Sammy Kaiser 2B, 2 runs.Records: Loyal/Granton 0-3; Stratford 3-1.last_img read more

Why We Need Web Apps on the Desktop

Why We Need Web Apps on the Desktop

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts josh catone 1 A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Trends#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Yesterday on this blog Sarah Perez wondered how important is offline access for web apps? Her conclusion was that offline access is important now, but not as important as it once was. And that with the increasing ubiquity of Internet access, it is growing less important every day. I won’t dispute that, but there is an important distinction to be made between offline access to web apps (as Google Gears provides) and desktop access to web apps (as Mozilla’s Prism and Adobe’s AIR provide). The latter is a very important step in the evolution of web apps.There are two main reasons for why desktop access for web apps is important: It will actually help make web apps more popular.Running a ton of apps in the browser at once is a pain.The Desktop is the Key to Making Web Apps MainstreamAs I commented in Sarah’s post yesterday, for those of us who read blogs like ReadWriteWeb, using web apps has become second nature. Putting data in the cloud makes sense, and the thought of being offline for more than 10 minutes per day seems ludicrous. But I suspect that’s not the case for everyone.For many mainstream users, I think the idea of storing your data in the cloud is kind of creepy (that’s the word my girlfriend used the other day when I was explaining to her how things like Google Docs work). Giving those people access to the software in the traditional form of a desktop application will, in my opinion, help push them gently toward web applications. Get them hooked on Google Docs on the desktop, convince them of the convenience of having anywhere access to the app on the web, and then you might start seeing people really embrace web apps as they get more comfortable with the idea.The conversation I had with my girlfriend went something like this (paraphrasing heavily here):Her: “So where are my documents stored?”Me: “On Google’s servers.”Her: “And I don’t actually own the software?”Me: “No, you just sort of rent it.”Her: “So if Google goes down, or decides to stop making Docs, they take my software and documents with it?”Me: “Theoretically that could happen, yeah.”Her: “And if there’s a security breach my documents are there for the taking?”Me: “Technically, yes.”Her: “That’s kinda creepy…. I don’t think I like that.”I think that’s a fairly standard view among mainstream software users. So, desktop access becomes important as a means to an end. Web apps will have a much smoother road to mass mainstream adoption if offline/desktop versions are used as a bridge.The Browser is No Place for MultitaskingLooking at my Windows taskbar right now, I have copies of Thunderbird, Trillian, Photoshop, FeedDemon, Notepad, Word, Winamp, and Twhirl running. Sure, I could run web app equivalents of each of those in the browser — GMail, Meebo, Aviary Phoenix, Google Reader, Docs, Pandora, and a Twitter module in Netvibes might suffice. But they’d all be running in Firefox at once (oh, Firefox is also running on my system right now).Managing those apps from the desktop is pretty simple. Managing them all at once in Firefox would be a nightmare, and would likely start to make Firefox unstable and act naughty. That’s precisely the reason FreshBooks launched a desktop app today using Mozilla Prism. “One thing I hear occasionally from our users, especially Web professionals, is that running a bunch of browser-based apps at once can be a particular pain when the browser decides to misbehave,” wrote Freshbooks developer Rich Lafferty.As Mitch Grasso, founder of Sliderocket (our coverage) wrote in a comment here yesterday, “Adobe AIR isn’t just about taking apps offline. Multi-window support, drag and drop, keyboard shortcuts, and access to the rich clipboard are all things that you take for granted in a desktop app are difficult or impossible to do in a browser. Browsers are designed for reading webpages – not hosting applications.”There might be a day when the web truly is our operating system, and when browsers really will be designed to run multiple applications. But that day hasn’t arrived, and until it does, bringing web apps to the desktop is another important step in their evolution and the way forward in pushing the idea of hosting data in the cloud out to the mainstream.ConclusionThere is a third reason desktop/offline access is important: web access isn’t yet ubiquitous. There are plenty of times when connecting to the Internet just isn’t happening, and having access to your data and your software on the desktop is definitely beneficial during those times. But, as Sarah wrote yesterday, no access is becoming more the exception than the rule. Every day offline access is becoming less and less important for applications, but desktop access is still necessary.What do you think? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

So You’re Planning to Fail Your Next Retail Crisis

So You’re Planning to Fail Your Next Retail Crisis

first_imgIs your organization planning to fail, or only failing to plan for your next retail crisis? Most organizations would emphatically state that they are not planning to fail; however, as this post will illustrate, if the organization is failing to prepare for a crisis, then the outcome could well be the same.Planning for a retail crisis isn’t about the doomsday scenario but about ensuring organizations seize the opportunity presented and create a more resilient body—one that is responsive, alert to future challenges, and able to deliver to customers and stakeholders and to meet shareholder expectations.There are ten critical aspects relating to retail crisis management:- Sponsor – 1. Sponsorship—senior executive engagement is critical to a successful crisis program. 2. Definition—define the crisis, what it means, and how the organization should respond. 3. Training—train people because crisis leadership is not innate. Most leaders have tried to avoid it, so many will have limited experience. 4. Leadership—leadership must be with ownership and humanity; so too must the communications (both internally and externally). 5. Clarity—assigning roles and responsibilities is critical. 6. Assessment—assess the situation, information, thoughts, actions, and communication. 7. Protection—protect your people, brand, and reputation. 8. Response—respond consistently and at the speed of the incident, not that of the organization. 9. Recovery—recover as quickly as possible in line with the recovery time objectives. 10. Debrief—learn and improve to be ready for next time.These aspects were confirmed and underlined across numerous industries during a recent panel discussion I moderated covering crisis management and communications. The debate considered the impact of current high-profile operational incidents, terrorism, and cyber-attacks, and how organizations could best prepare and respond to the ever-changing risk and threat landscape.They are also in line with a recent industry survey where 46 percent identified lack of senior management buy-in and support as the most significant challenge to efficiently preparing their organizations for a crisis.Buy InWithout support at a level that is senior enough and from an individual who has both the motivation and the political capital to support the project, it is unlikely to succeed. Articulating the benefits to stakeholders of a comprehensive program, including horizon scanning and exercising, is vital to gaining buy-in and engagement. Commonly realized gains include increased efficiency and cost savings through avoiding or pre-preparing for incidents, better cross-functional working, greater empowerment, and motivation of staff.Crisis? What Crisis?One may think that defining this would be a relatively simple task. Anyone dealing with either business continuity management or crisis management in a corporate environment has probably come across statements such as “We handle crises every day” or “I will know it when I see it.”We’ve seen many high-profile examples of crisis management in action recently. What becomes apparent is the response of those well drilled in crisis response, usually displaying slick actions, being efficient, and instilling confidence in those around them. What is equally clear is the response from those whose crisis management protocols fall short of expected standards. One has only to look at the 2017 case studies of British Airways or United Airlines and their respective crisis communications as examples negatively affecting both brand reputation and shareholder value.One dictionary meaning of crisis is a “time when a difficult or important decision must be made; the situation has reached crisis point.” This definition primarily revolves around what constitutes a crisis and what sets it apart from a routine emergency. An element of pre-planning and mitigation can usually be put in place in relation to a routine emergency, due to the likelihood or predictability of that scenario occurring. Although still challenging, routine means some element of predictability allowing for advanced preparation.One could see a crisis as being at the edges of a storm; you can be so busy dealing with the initial effects that you do not stand back to see the whole picture, revealing that you are just in the eye of the storm. If you don’t stand back, how do you know you have reached and dealt with the end of the crisis?We should be mindful that what is a crisis for one industry could well be business as usual for another. Having people in harm’s way is what news media do regularly, but for the majority of businesses, this could indicate a crisis. Equally, what looks like a crisis for one department may not even raise pulses in another. Therefore, a formal, aligned, and agreed definition adequately documented within company policy is vital.Preparation: Team Structure, Roles and Responsibilities, and ExerciseThose slick teams mentioned previously didn’t get that way by accident. They prepared—a lot. In addition to their knowledge on processes and operations, members knew their roles and responsibilities. Without this forethought, dealing with even routine emergencies can be unnecessarily challenging.Practice, Practice, PracticeCrises can affect retail both directly and indirectly as we have seen from instances as wide-ranging as terrorism, natural disasters, and operational emergencies. Many people, myself included, have dealt with those types of scenarios in a corporate environment; however, others across different parts of your organization will not have, and even those experienced in each retail crisis type will acknowledge that seemingly similar crises present various new and unique challenges.Some skills are learned; others are innate. Crisis management and the teamwork needed for a successful outcome require practice, and that means testing the process together. It is critical that people understand their roles and responsibilities but are also ready to get involved with other requirements that might not be immediately apparent other than in a crisis or during an exercise, such as how to prepare people for the unexpected. One cannot know if the organization is resilient until it is tested.Desktop exercises allow any flaws in the plan, documentation, or existing business processes to be understood while the opportunity to rectify them is there. Having facilitated exercises where the person responsible for the documentation is “100 percent certain” it is up to date, only to find incorrect phone numbers, or that someone left the business a year ago, is humorous during an exercise but not funny when lives or the company are at stake.Responsibilities, Roles, and ClarityKeeping the strategic core team small enough to be efficient in decision-making and broad enough to cover core business is an important step. People or departments not included initially can be brought in as required. Defining who is responsible overall at strategic, tactical, and operational levels (also often referred to as gold, silver, and bronze levels) should usually follow existing departmental and organizational lines, with precise definitions of relevant considerations being outlined per department. Pre-defining this also saves time during any incident.Assessing the CrisisA mnemonic I use is SITAC:Situation. What’s happened? Where? Who’s involved? Who’s nearby? Can we account for our team?Information. What do we know? What don’t we know? How will we fill in the blanks? You will rarely have all the facts.Thoughts. Include the strategic, tactical, and operational teams (both within the organization and external advisors such as the emergency services).Actions. What do we need to decide? What do we need to act on? By when? By whom?Communications. How often? To whom? Consider both internal and external stakeholders. What and when will we communicate to different populations?Everything must be documented comprehensively; it may be required post-event for internal organizational debriefs or legal or regulatory actions.Organizations should review pre-scheduled marketing communications that are due to go out via social media. Such communications are often a source of embarrassment, when what had been perfectly acceptable becomes unacceptable due to a specific crisis topic. British Airways, United Airlines, and GCHQ have all fallen foul of this during a crisis.ProtectionPeople, brand, and reputation are among the most vital aspects to consider relating to both crises and routine emergencies. People (from employees to the public) have to be at the heart of all discussions and decisions.ResponseAny response must always be at the speed of the incident and not at the speed of the organization. Some organizations will need to become quicker at decision-making, while others will be required to pause and ensure they have adequate information and have considered the situation. Social media will often accelerate that speed particularly in relation to PR and communications.RecoverIf adequate planning has occurred before any crisis, priorities will be understood across the business, enabling responses that match with and are focused on recovery time objectives.DebriefHow do you improve if you don’t identify what went well and what needs improvement? Remember those slick teams I mentioned? Debriefing is fundamental to their success. Make it an essential part of your retail crisis team’s success.This article was originally published in LP Magazine Europe in 2017 and was updated August 21, 2018. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Risk Assessment Training Scenarios That Actually Help with Preparedness

Risk Assessment Training Scenarios That Actually Help with Preparedness

first_imgImagine the scenario: you are in the cockpit of a 747 approaching the lights of the runway, when the starboard engine bursts into flames, throwing the aircraft off its gentle downward trajectory towards residential properties—where you can almost see the faint light of television sets in the homes you are potentially about to flatten.What is your first action? Do you take immediate remedial steps to extinguish the fire while pulling the plane back towards the airfield? Or do you aim for playing fields beyond the rooftops, where you believe there is a 70 percent chance you can land with minimum loss of life or serious injury to passengers or homeowners?There are no easy answers. As a pilot, you must take into consideration all factors—weather, wind speed, visibility, trajectory, fuel levels, and so forth.- Sponsor – More importantly, in this risk assessment training scenario, it is exactly just that—a scenario. The flight deck you are on is in fact a flight simulator that mimics real life-and-death situations where you, as a trainee or even a more experienced pilot, would be expected to make decisive actions at the critical time.Risk assessment training scenarios like this one are cost-effective tools to get pilots to experience and react to challenging situations without having to put them through the real thing. Thankfully, they will face such a situation on very few occasions in real life, but quick decision-making becomes second nature with preparedness and constant rehearsals.A Preventative ApproachEmergency risk planning and training has become a major growth industry in the corporate world. For example, the “run, hide, tell” training videos rolled out across the globe inform retailers and office workers what to do in the case of active shooter terrorist incidents. Other organizations offer continuity planning if a bomb, hacker, or natural disaster takes out infrastructure or vital computer servers.On a more mundane level, the office fire drill—how to leave a building in an orderly manner and where to assemble and be checked in and out of the office—is the everyday training just about every worker or building occupant is familiar with. Although many see it as a disruption to be standing around in shirtsleeves in a blustery parking lot, most begrudgingly recognize its importance should flames ever sweep through the building. They know where to go to be safe.In the world of loss prevention, many businesses have taken this idea to the next level and introduced “shrink schools” to educate staff about what loss looks like, how to spot it, what behaviors to look out for, where the pinch points are (usually around stock and cash), and even how to identify those most prone to dishonesty within an organization or a team.Those immersed in the world of total loss also educate their associates about the importance of compliance and how to transform negatives into positives, as LP teams reinvent themselves as agents of sales creation. Knowing where stock is in a world of perpetual inventory means staff have fewer shadows to chase in terms of looking for malicious loss when the prime suspect is poor process.This preventative back-to-school approach is two-fold. First, it informs staff to be vigilant and help the business to reduce risk and save money. Second, it is a preventative message to deter anyone thinking of committing theft or fraud. It lets them know they are likely to get caught and what the consequences will be thereafter—from losing their job to the heavy burden of a criminal record and a loss of trust for the foreseeable future.The Strange Case of Mrs. Slipandfall: A Different Kind of Risk Assessment Training ScenarioIn the world of workplace safety, such simulated training is also proving to be an invaluable tool and is bringing the worlds of corporate governance together with that of academia. Students studying to become environmental health practitioners (EHPs) at Liverpool John Moores University get to practice and hone their newly learned skills when faced with a room of senior health and safety officers—whom some would suggest are their nemesis or bête noire—the types of people the students are likely to face once they qualify.These are not desk exercises, but real case scenarios, often set outside of the theoretical world of the university. In the session attended by LP Magazine Europe, twenty or more EHPs traveled 200 miles from Merseyside to the offices and distribution centre (DC) of A. S. Watson, the parent company of Superdrug, Savers, and The Perfume Shop in Dunstable, Bedfordshire, to work with a wide range of retail health and safety officers.Both students and retailers were faced with a scenario that mirrored real-life challenges, and they worked together in teams to suggest correct ways forward based upon what transpired in an unfolding and evolving situation.The storyline in Dunstable was one of a fictional store called WonderPill, a health and beauty store with a dispensing pharmacy, 500 stores across the UK, and 9,000 employees. Let’s set the scene.WonderPill becomes a flagship retailer in a brand new shopping center, one destined to regenerate the fortunes of Brooksea, a once-thriving industrial town now the home of high unemployment, a proliferation of charity shops, and a large and diverse ethnic population. Sheila Maguire is a new WonderPill manager with seven years’ experience in retail both at store and DC level. She has 25 associates answerable to her and a no-nonsense approach to risk and health and safety.WonderPill sells food, including sandwiches, for the busy lunchtime rush of office and factory workers. The scene is set. Enter Mr. and Mrs. Slipandfall, who are perusing the refrigerated display case when she falls over and injures herself in a pool of water coming from underneath the chiller unit.The participants were set their first test. Should they RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013) the incident? Yes, they should, and as soon as possible because of the injury. After a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Slipandfall, the team should make a full assessment of the state of the chiller unit because the water, suspected to be a contributory factor in the incident, was reportedly leaking for some time.But Graeme Mitchell, senior lecturer at John Moores University, had a few more surprises for them. He layered the tale with additional storylines.Maguire, who we learn from the interview with the “victims” has banned the couple from the store, is now too busy to meet the EHPs who are trying to arrange a store visit because she has a celebrity coming to the store and a large crowd is expected. What do the EHPs need to take with them when they are finally granted an audience? Can they insist upon attending that day despite the celebrity’s visit because of their concerns over the potential cover-up of vital evidence?And the layers continued to build.Maguire has form. Further interviews reveal she has supplemented staff payment with out-of-date sandwiches, and at least one employee has been off sick with food poisoning. What do the EHPs believe to be the difference between sell-by dates and best-before dates on food?What appeared to be a clear-cut case became highly nuanced as the scenario unfolded, making an ostensibly straightforward decision less obvious. It went from a simple customer injury to a scenario where Maguire and her twenty staff could be closed down, adding to the already high unemployment rate in Brooksea and creating a public relations disaster.Safety professionals and retailers in the room were required to pull from their collective memories and experience to arrive at the relevant regulation and sections with which to proceed and prosecute. The scenario invokes section 20 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, section 14 of the Food Safety Act, and Regulation 6 and 8 of the Food Safety & Hygiene Act 2013. Participants were also required to understand the fine details of criminal cautions under the PACE Act (Police and Criminal Evidence) 1984.A simple slip therefore escalated into a full health and safety investigation and a “mitigation of brand damage” exercise.This fact was not wasted on the retailers in the room, who, as part of their day jobs, are required to micro- and macro-manage complex and aged estates, young staff, and legacy equipment, as well as having to deal with managers who pay lip service to health and safety as nothing more than “a bit of common sense.”Back to the Real WorldDarryl Parker, head of health and safety for A. S. Watson, who hosted the event, said, “We find these scenarios with John Moores University invaluable and invite as many of our industry peers as possible to attend. The simulations test the knowledge and experience of those of us risk managers who carry responsibility for health and safety across the business. The students who attend get to challenge received wisdom, and they bring fresh thinking to the event, which helps us all to be better practitioners. It is a win-win for all of us.”Graeme Mitchell of John Moores University said, “We do a number of these events either in Liverpool or around the country. It helps the student to understand everyday challenges of industry and that all cases are not what they seem—and certainly not black and white as health and safety sometimes has to effectively operate in very grey areas where there are few absolutes. Such exercises help the students to learn from experienced practitioners and serve as a good example of best practice collaboration between the worlds of academia and commerce that can only help to bring more curious EHPs into the market.”From shrink schools to fire drills, simulation delivers the necessary stimulation of thought to instinctively do the right thing, whether it is cockpit training to avoid a major air accident or role play to prevent a slip-and-trip from escalating into a full-blown chiller thriller resulting in mass unemployment. Crises incubate in everyday scenarios where inaction can be as dangerous as threatening action and where run and hide are no longer options available.This post was originally published in LP Magazine Europe in 2017 and was updated January 30, 2018. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

What You Missed at Monktoberfest

What You Missed at Monktoberfest

first_imgIf you look over the agenda you might notice a pattern. A smashing line-up of speakers, no doubt, but not very diverse. Monktoberfest had no women speaking at all, and not too many women in attendance. I did talk to O’Grady and Governor about the testosterone-heavy speakers list, and they let me know they had approached women to speak at the event but the scheduling didn’t work for the women that they asked. They also made clear that they were going to make an effort to ensure that they have women on the list next time around.The suggestion I have is that they should consider a second day with an un-conference format. The audience that attended Monktoberfest had a lot to offer, and I think that some of the talks might have spun off great discussions with more time. Plus, as fantastic as the event was, it’s a lot of travel for a one-day event. But the RedMonk gang knocked it out of the part for a first-time event. It was well worth the trip, and I’m looking forward to round two in London. The wrap-up dinner was, well, over-the-top. We ate at The Lion’s Pride, a bar/eatery in Brunswick that has an A+ rating on Beeradvocate. The beers were unusual and quite good. The food – starting with appetizers, then several courses and dessert – was abundant and well-done. I’d write more about it, but I think it might be cruel to those who didn’t attend to go into detail. Lessons Learned at MonktoberfestWhile there’s plenty of good things to be said about the food and drink at Monktoberfest, I can find reasonably good food and drink in St. Louis. I wouldn’t have flown cross-country to attend Monktoberfest if it hadn’t promised to be enlightening as well. I’ve already written about Matt LeMay’s talk about Bit.ly data and Greg Avola’s presentation on Untappd. Those were really top-notch talks. After lunch we heard from Theo Schlossnagle, who talked about social improvements in monitoring. Schlossnagle had a lot of really good points about what we can learn from monitoring and how to implement process in a business. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting joe brockmeier 1 The Monktoberfest conference held yesterday in Portland, Maine was a great success. The first-time developer conference about social, tech and beer delivered all that it promised, and then some. The conference, organized by RedMonk emphasized the social side of software development. Unlike many conferences that are hard tech or business focused, Monktoberfest focused primarily on the things that make software development a passion and not just a job. And beer, of course.Attention Conference PlannersI didn’t do a formal survey, but I asked a lot of the Monktoberfest attendees what they thought of the event. Not a single person complained about the event. So what did the Redmonk folks get right? Two things above all else – catering and content. “People matter, and we have to care about them.” James GovernorObviously, beer was a big focus of Monktoberfest. The evening before the event we met at a fantastic craft beer place in Portland and had a great selection of beers and appetizers. The conversation flowed well, and it was a great ice-breaker for the following day. The day of the event, the RedMonk folks arranged a really good lunch that was not the standard conference fare. Lobster rolls, chowder, and a few other options that I forget. (But worth noting that there were good vegetarian options as well.) And yes, there were good beers for lunch as well. I’m sure the catering cost was a bit higher than the average conference on a per-attendee basis, but I’m also sure that was a major contributing factor to attendees’ happiness with the event. Well-fed people are happy people as a rule. Conferences that skimp on the food and drink tend to skimp elsewhere. To be fair, I’ve been at conferences that were well-received that had mediocre food, but that’s usually community run events that don’t charge much (or anything) for attendance. If you’re charging, making with good food is a really effective way to ensure that people go away happy. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Zack Urlocker, now with Zendesk, gave a really good presentation on social and distributed development. Urlocker, formerly with MySQL, has a lot of tips here that he gathered from his time at MySQL and by reaching out to other folks who manage or work on distributed teams. One thing Urlocker said that really resonated with me was when he talked about team leaders who didn’t make an effort to go where the developers were. Instead of one person traveling to the team, they’d require the entire team to travel to them. That’s simply broken, for a lot of reasons. It’s more costly, and it’s lousy for morale. Urlocker also stressed the importance of not putting all the burden of time zones on one team or person. For instance, if you have employees all over the world, meetings shouldn’t always revolve around one time zone. Nobody appreciates having to always be the one waking up early or staying up late to attend virtual meetings. On Difficult DevelopersThe last presentation, “Assholes are Killing Your Project,” was also lively. Donnie Berkholz, of the Gentoo project, has been giving this presentation for a while but it’s still relevant. Berkholz largely talks about open source projects, but it also applies to companies with volatile and difficult employees. Conferences that skimp on the food and drink tend to skimp elsewhere. To be fair, I’ve been at conferences that were well-received that had mediocre food, but that’s usually community run events that don’t charge much (or anything) for attendance. If you’re charging, making with good food is a really effective way to ensure that people go away happy.One of the points Berkholz made is that we seem to think that a lack of social skills is consistent with being a good developer. Many talented software engineers tend to be, well, difficult. He noted that some of the more contentious and damaging people in Gentoo (that inspired the talk) were also extremely productive and probably “better” than many of their peers. But they weren’t worth the damage that they caused. Berkholz showed a graph of involvement with Gentoo, and overlaid lines on the graph that corresponded with the rise in assholishness and decline in community participation. A key thing, says Berkholz, is to have metrics – have a way to display the impact on the project that comes with dealing with the difficult contributors.That might be difficult in some situations, but Berkholz recommends pulling contribution statistics and mailing list traffic stats to demonstrate a correlation between bad behavior and a drop-off in contributions. After Berkholz’s talk, James Governor took a few minutes to wrap up the conference. Monktoberfest, says Governor in part, is about the fact that “people matter, and we have to care about them.” Software development is not just about making money, it’s about people. Where to Improve?Really, there’s only one thing I’d ding the conference for, and one suggestion that I’ve made for the next event. (Yes, there will be another event.) Tags:#cloud#events last_img read more