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Semifinal Preview: Football Class C

Semifinal Preview: Football Class C

first_imgSemifinal Preview: Football Class C Subscribe by Email Follow on Facebook Share on Facebook Connect on Linked in Semifinal Preview: Football Class C added by johnmitchelllikanje on October 23, 2018View all posts by johnmitchelllikanje →FacebookTwitter分享by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksSponsor ContentBig Data Courses | Search AdOnline Big Data Courses Might Be Better than You ThinkBig Data Courses | Search AdCosmoWomensTop 30 Most Beautiful Women in the WorldCosmoWomensLovely&HealthyTop 10 Most Dangerous Cruises In The World Lovely&Healthyby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksMore from Pickin’ SplintersBaron keeps Bonaventure close to his heart – Pickin’ SplintersTah-Jae Hill, Zion Morrison and the Starting Five – Pickin’ Splinters”If you had a Mount Rushmore of MCC baseball, he’s on there.” Longtime assistant Jack Christensen passes away – Pickin’ Splinters This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.center_img Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYour email address will not be published. Senior running back Jayden Castrechini had 20 carries for 274 rushing yards and six touchdowns in ER/Gananda’s 62-32 win over Waterloo in the quarterfinals. (Photo: CHRISTOPHER CECERE)Top-seeded East Rochester/Gananda takes on No. 5 seed Attica while No. 2 Penn Yan and No. 3 Letchworth/Warsaw lock horns. Spots in the Section V Class C are up for grabs.. Here’s the breakdown:Semifinal MatchupsNo. 1 EAST ROCHESTER/GANANDA vs. No. 5 ATTICA, 4 pm, Saturday, Honeoye Falls-LimaNo. 2 PENN YAN vs. No. 3 LETCHWORTH/WARSAW, 7 pm, Saturday, Honeoye Falls-LimaFinals5 pm, Saturday, November 3, St. John Fisher CollegeNo. 1 seed EAST ROCHESTER/GANANDA BOMBERS (Finger Lakes East)Record/NYSSWA Rank: 7-1/No. 14Quarterfinal Results: def. Waterloo 62-32Last Week: The Bombers had 622 yards of offense, all of which came on the ground in their quarterfinal win over Waterloo. The 622 yards was the second most in Section V playoff history. The 62 points tied for seventh on the all-time Section V points scored list. Senior quarterback Corywn Cleveland had 21 carries for 285 rushing yards and two touchdowns. Senior running back Jayden Castrechini had 20 carries for 274 rushing yards and six touchdowns. Castrechini’s 40-point game (six touchdowns, four points on conversions) broke the Section V playoff record for most points in a game.Notable: One of three FL East teams to make it to the semifinals (Penn Yan in Class C; Wayne in Class B)Key Players: Jayden Castrechini (187 carries for 1,727 rushing yards and 24 rushing touchdowns; nine catches for 155 yards and four receiving touchdowns — career topped the 4,000 mark on the ground. Needs 273 yards to top the Y2K mark for the second consecutive season (averages 216.9 this year), Corwyn Cleveland (maybe the biggest quarterback in Section V (6′-255 lbs), also starts at DTThrough The Eyes Of The Coach: “It’s going to be a good physical football game. Attica is tough with athletes and are well coached. I expect a great game from both teams. Our team I know will give everything they have for 48 minutes,” says coach Brian TouranjoeVIEW MORE CHRISTOPHER CECERE PHOTOS HERE.No. 2 seed PENN YAN MUSTANGS (Finger Lakes East)Record/NYSSWA Rank: 7-1/No. 16Quarterfinals Results: def. Dansville 48-0Last Week: Senior quarterback went 26-29 for 340 yards and six touchdowns as the Mustangs won their fifth straight game, defeating Dansville 48-0. Senior wide receiver Conner Fingar had 12 catches for 177 yards and five touchdowns. Penn Yan now averages 41.1 points per game.Notable: One of three Finger Lakes East teams to make it to the semifinals (East Rochester/Gananda in Class C; Wayne in Class B)Key Players: Will Rogers (198-for-264 for 2,712 yards and 37 touchdowns; may break the Sec V passing season marks set in 2015 (3030 yards and 37 TDs). Needs 318 and 1 TD (avgs 339.0 yards/4.6 TDs per game this season), Conner Fingar (86 catches for 1050 yards and 17 touchdowns)Through The Eyes Of The Coach: “Letchworth/Warsaw is a very good team and we’ll need to execute offensively and match their physicality defensively. We have been playing well lately and we believe this will be a close, competitive game. Like most games it will come down to blocking and tackling,” says coach Tim McBride.No. 3 seed LETCHWORTH/WARSAW (Livingston County II)Record/NYSSWA Rank: 7-1/No. 20Quarterfinals Results: def. Mynderse 35-7Last week: Letchworth/Warsaw won their fifth straight game by defeating Mynderse.Key Players: Senior running back Adrian Figoura will shoulder much of the load while senior quarterback Tom Standera will have to make quick decisions against an aggressive Penn Yan defense.What To Watch: Letworth/Warsaw will be tested defensively against Penn Yan. Defense has given up 81 points — but 40 came against Batavia. They have held six opponents to one touchdown or less and have two shutouts. Through The Eyes Of The Coach: “Penn Yan is well-coached and has balance. You cannot just game plan to take one player away they have  playmakers all over the field. They throw the ball very well and have a very good running game. You can see why they have had the success that they have had this year. It shows on the film.  As far as we go, we have to have a great week of practice. We have to come in with the mindset each day this week that if we want to have success on Saturday, We have to earn it with ever rep we take this week. We have to continue to get better. This team has goals and are willing to work in order to achieve those goals,” says coach Justin Mann.No. 5 seed ATTICA BLUE DEVILS (Livingston County IV)Record/NYSSWA Rank: 7-1/No. 15Quarterfinal Results: def. Wayland-Cohocton 31-28Last Week: Attica was one of only two teams to pull off an upset in the sectional quarterfinals (York/Pavilion). The Blue Devils won last week’s game with a last-second touchdown pass from Edward Strezelec to his brother, Zachary. Attica had just completed just 17 passes in the seven previous games. But they aired it out in this game, as Edward Strzelec completed 7-of-13 passes for 136 yards and two touchdowns. That upped Attica’s season passing stat line to 24-for-51 for five touchdowns.Notable: Attica‘s game plan is simple: Run the ball. 87 percent of the offense comes on the ground, in a myriad of formations.Key Players: When Edward Strzelec isn’t passing, he’s the team’s leading rusher (85 carries for 668 rushing yards and five touchdowns) but not far behind is running back Mason Compton (85 carries for 663 rushing yards and seven touchdowns)Key Matchups: Both teams run the ball well. The game will be decided in the trenches with the line exerting more will ending up as the victor.What to Watch For: Will Attica mix it up? Or stay with its rushing attack which netted 600 yards in a game against Avon this season (W 58-14)Through the Eyes of the Coach: “We are right where we want to be and have another great test in ER/Gananda.  They have two very versatile and special players on offense (Cleveland and Castrechini) and compliment each other very well. We will need to slow them down in order to win the game.  Offensively, we’re going to do what we do and hopefully give them all they can handle,” says Attica coach Calib Sabatino. Print This Post Add to Google+ By johnmitchelllikanje on October 23, 2018No Comment last_img read more

PSVAR in coaches: How will changes affect you?

PSVAR in coaches: How will changes affect you?

first_imgThe PSV Accessibility Regulations will expand to capture all coaches that are used on in-scope work from 1 January 2020. There’s a lot more to it than first thought, and many service will fall in scopePossibly overlooked in the debate concerning retrofit of coaches to achieve Euro 6 is the extension of the end of the derogation for some coaches from the PSV Accessibility Regulations (PSVAR).From 1 January 2020, all coaches with more than 22 passenger seats that are used on a scheduled or local where separate fares are charged must satisfy PSVAR. It mandates access for wheelchair users among other requirements.That’s an extension to the existing scenario. Currently, all coaches that were first used on or after 1 January 2005 are subject to PSVAR when on in-scope duties. Those first used on or after 1 January 2001 are also subject to PSVAR, but not including a requirement for wheelchair access.Even now, interpreting exactly how PSVAR applies to coaches is tricky. Several grey areas exist, and there is an exemption for tours.However, operators should consider several things when weighing up whether any of their services are in scope. More may be captured than some think.Not negotiablePSVAR is most relevant to school and college routes. However, a body of opinion suggests that those services may qualify for the specific exemption that describes a tour as “where a PSV is used for or in conjunction with the carriage of passengers to a particular location, or particular locations, and back to their point of departure.” Whether that is the case or not can be decided only in court. It will take a brave operator to make itself the subject of a test case.The other argument is clear, however. An industry source says that there is a strong view – and corresponding political will – to suggest that the intent has always been to include such services.Legislation states that in-scope services are regular, i.e. they observe specified routes and times, with passengers collected and set down at pre-determined points. Clearly, those conditions apply to school and college routes.What PSVAR hinges on is whether separate fares are charged. The Operator Licensing Guide states: “A separate fare is where each passenger makes a separate payment to the driver, conductor or an agent to use the vehicle. They may pay when they get on, or they may buy tickets in advance, have season tickets or use concessionary passes. Payment can also be made by some indirect means, e.g. a concert ticket that includes travel.”Even if one passenger pays a fare, the service is in scope if it satisfies the other requirements. Importantly, it does not need to be registered with the Traffic Commissioner to be subject to PSVAR – but if all passengers are carried free, PSVAR does not apply.Newer coaches on in scope services have long been subjected to PSVARBecause the definition of separate fares includes services where money is paid to an agent, the onus is on the operator to ascertain whether the contracting body will charge separate fares to users. If it does, the service is in scope.“If a service is in scope of PSVAR, there is no argument: It has to be operated with a compliant vehicle – but it will likely take a court to rule on the exact details,” says Confederation of Passenger Transport Coaching Manager Andy Warrender.Is free an option?A possible method of circumventing the legislation is by making services free to the end user.routeone is aware of one council that asked operators to submit two tenders: One where passengers, or some passengers, continue to pay a fare, and one where all travel is completely free.Carrying passengers for free may be the easiest way to deal with PSVAR. It is thought that the number of compliant coaches in the UK is insufficient to cover all in-scope services. Swapping operation to compliant buses is another option.The Operator Licensing Guide introduces uncertainty regarding services that are provided free to the user, but where a charge is made by other means, such as those operated on behalf of fee-paying schools. Its use of the concert ticket that includes travel example demonstrates that.Lack of clarityAs can be seen, much remains unknown about the precise extent of how PSVAR will impact coach operators from January. Also uncertain is what approach DVSA will take to enforcement. Thus far, it has adopted a hands-off strategy.The separate fare aspect is key to judging whether services operated by coaches are in scope of PSVAR. Even if the operator is contracted solely to provide the vehicle, they still need to explore whether separate fares as defined by the Operator Licensing Guide are charged. One positive is that if they are not, the service is unquestionably not in scope.routeone commentPSVAR’s extension to encompass all coaches on in-scope services is a significant change. Although those first used on or after 1 January 2001 have been captured by the Regulations for some time, many school and college services are operated with vehicles that are older.January’s change is almost part of a perfect storm. As local authorities have become increasingly cash strapped, many have removed free travel and introduced a requirement to pay. And separate fares are key.If enforcement is aggressive, it’s unclear what will happen. Do enough compliant coaches exist to operate all in-scope services? Sourcing buses is not an issue, but whether that change would suit parents, schools and operators is questionable. What’s clear is that if the requirement is pursued with no other changes to operation, many rates will need to rise. On that basis alone, it remains to be seen how the change will be handled.last_img read more

Dale Rocheleau rejoins Downs Rachlin Martin

Dale Rocheleau rejoins Downs Rachlin Martin

first_imgDowns Rachlin Martin PLLC,Downs Rachlin Martin has welcomed Dale Rocheleau back to the firm, following his tenure as senior vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary at Central Vermont Public Service Corp. He will join DRM as senior counsel on August 31. He will be based in the firm’s Burlington office. ‘Dale is an exceptionally well regarded, effective lawyer and senior executive,’said DRM ManagingPartner Paul H. Ode Jr. ‘Our clients, particularly those whose businesses are highly regulated, can greatly benefit from his high-level strategic advice on matters related to law, governance, regulatory relations, risk and compliance. His diverse experience uniquely positions him to counsel business leaders and assist them in accomplishing their goals.’ Until the sale of Vermont’s largest utility to Gaz Métro Limited Partnership closed in June, Dale had served as the company’s chief legal and corporate affairs adviser since 2003. At CVPS, which was recognized by Forbes in 2010 as one of the most trustworthy companies in America, he managed the departments responsible for legal, corporate governance, enterprise risk management and public relations activities, including investor and media relations, and customer, employee, community and government communications. Dale joined Downs Rachlin Martin in 1986, shortly after earning his law degree, with honors, from Georgetown University. He advanced rapidly and was elected to membership as a director in 1992. He chaired the firm’s Regulated Entities Practice Group, obtaining permits and approvals for economic development projects in Vermont ranging from $1 million to $225 million and assisting businesses and trade associations in negotiating, drafting and securing passage of significant legislation. Dale is a member of the University of Vermont’s board of trustees and serves as president of the Rutland Economic Development Corporation. Previously, he has served as chair of the Vermont Water Resources Board, director of the Lund Family Center, director of the Vermont Business Roundtable, president of the University of Vermont Alumni Association, trustee of the Vermont Historical Society, advisor to the governor of Vermont as a member of the Governor’s Council of Environmental Advisors and director of Cynosure Inc. from 2003 to 2010. He received the University of Vermont Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award in 2008.last_img read more

Flann Microwave Marks 60 years of Success as Leading Manufacturer of Microwave Components

Flann Microwave Marks 60 years of Success as Leading Manufacturer of Microwave Components

first_img Played a key role equipping the newly-built Goonhilly Earth Station, which received the first live transatlantic television broadcasts from the United States in 1962 – and Flann, is still supporting the facility more than 50 years on. Developed the first computer-controlled waveguide attenuator – these measurement devices are used to test and calibrate microwave data links for phone and mobile networks and are used 24/7, 365 days a year by manufacturers all over the world. Developed precision microwave standards used to calibrate measurements by National Metrology labs including NPL (UK), NIST (US) and most other countries. Designer and manufacturer of specialist waveguide components used in airport-type security body scanners. Involved in the manufacture, installation and test of precision waveguide equipment as part of the upgrade of the country’s Air Traffic Control Radar system. The 10-year project carried out by NATS, the UK’s air traffic management company, was completed in 2013 and involved upgrading or replacing all of the UK’s main 23 radar stations. Flann Microwave has celebrated 60 years of success with an investment in a new Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) to further enhance the precision manufacturing and testing of its waveguide and calibration technology. Over the last six decades, Flann has secured a global reputation for innovation and the production of precision microwave and millimeter-wave passive waveguide components, sub-assemblies, calibration kits, and instrumentation to 500 GHz. The company is based in Bodmin, Cornwall, UK and has a team of 60 employees. They serve customers in the telecoms, government, automotive, aerospace, defense and research sectors, exporting more than 80 per cent of what they produce. Flann have worked with government agencies in the UK and overseas to write many of the standards used in the industry today.Flann has already taken delivery of its new OGP CNC 300 CMM (coordinate measuring machine), which incorporates TTL (Thru The Lens) laser measurement and has a standard accuracy of +/-1.8um in XY & +/-2.4um in Z, although when used as a comparator, Flann expects to be able to realize +/-0.15um or better. It will enable engineers to automatically measure a part or assembly from an inspection program which can be written in conjunction with the engineering drawing, picking faces of the 3d model of the part and applying the geometric constraints and tolerances from the drawing.Flann was founded in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, in 1956 by engineer Bernard Fleming, who took his experience in radar and combined this with a passion for innovation and insight into the potential of waveguide technology.Some highlights of Flann over the last 60 years include:last_img read more