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UBL Wednesday: Boprey and Taylor lead DI Blue rally; quartet hurls 2-hitter for DI Red

UBL Wednesday: Boprey and Taylor lead DI Blue rally; quartet hurls 2-hitter for DI Red

first_img Connect on Linked in By Carson Werner on July 31, 2019No Comment Top: Jack Scanlon leads off first while David Flood holds the bag. Josh Ferris looks in for the sign. Middle left: Will Russotti. Middle right: Ethan Hurwitz leads off second. Malakai Taylor gets ready for the pitch. Bottom: Shane Harisis delivers during the second game of the night.DI BLUE 5DI GOLD 3Malakai Taylor (Mynderse) and Dylan Boprey (Hilton) collected an RBI apiece in a four-run seventh as DI Blue overcame a 3-1 for the come-from-behind victory. Taylor plated Grant Rodriguez (Rush-Henrietta) with a base hit and Boprey followed with a sacrifice fly. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Share on Facebook Print This Post Max Stuver goes oppo for a 2-out RBI triple. pic.twitter.com/AwyYGoPs1i— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) August 1, 2019Scanlon went 2-for-3 with two runs scored while VonAhnen tripled, walked twice and scored three runs. Dan Tirabassi takes away a hit from DJ Stoianovich pic.twitter.com/os5p9l5YqW— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) August 1, 2019Josh Ferris (Churchville-Chili) singled in DI Green’s two-run first. CJ Wiest (Brockport) drove in a run with a sacrifice fly. Max Stuver (McQuaid) drove in a run with two-out triple. Subscribe by Email UBL Wednesday: Boprey and Taylor lead DI Blue rally; quartet hurls 2-hitter for DI Red added by Carson Werner on July 31, 2019View all posts by Carson Werner →FacebookTwitter分享by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksSponsor ContentBig Data Courses | Search AdOnline Big Data Courses Might Be Better than You ThinkBig Data Courses | Search AdUndoAirPhysioThis All-Natural “Lung Cleaning” Device Helps Anyone Breathe EasierAirPhysioUndoCosmoWomensTop 30 Most Beautiful Women in the WorldCosmoWomensUndoby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksMore from Pickin’ SplintersBaron keeps Bonaventure close to his heart – Pickin’ SplintersUndoTah-Jae Hill, Zion Morrison and the Starting Five – Pickin’ SplintersUndo”If you had a Mount Rushmore of MCC baseball, he’s on there.” Longtime assistant Jack Christensen passes away – Pickin’ SplintersUndo Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYour email address will not be published. Follow on Facebook Jacob Keller (Churchville-Chili) had two RBI, scoring Ethan Hurwitz (Sutherland) both times. For the DI Blue, Jake Veniskey (Webster Thomas) tossed three innings of one-hit ball and struck out two in the process. Boprey struck out four over two innings and gave up one run on two hits. Blue worked four consecutive walks to start the decisive seventh inning.DI RED 7DI GREEN 3Four pitchers combined on a two-hitter and DI Red scored four in the second inning to take a lead it did not surrender. DJ Stoianovich plated Jack Scanlon (Aquinas) and Jack VonAhnen (Webster Schroeder) with a bases-loaded single. DJ Stoianovich gets the scoring started for DI Red with a single through the right side. Devyn Cannon comes up throwing from right field. pic.twitter.com/0YSnYTVNLf— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) August 1, 2019Ryan Coughlin (Greece Athena) and Stoianovich scored later in the inning on an error. Shane Harisis (Eastridge) started and struck out six over three innings of work. The right-hander retired eight of the last nine he faced. UBL Wednesday: Boprey and Taylor lead DI Blue rally; quartet hurls 2-hitter for DI Red Shane Harisis gets the ground ball. Paul Sofinski finishes it off. Mid 3: DI Red 4 DI Green 2 pic.twitter.com/rjbJ2GvdLG— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) August 1, 2019Nolan Schoenberger worked an inning and two-thirds of relief, fanning two in a clean fourth. Stoianovich set down four of the five batters he faced in a scoreless inning and a third of work while Andrew Treviso (Fairport) needed 10 pitches to close out the win. The right-hander struck out the final batter of the game. William Russotti pitched the first five innings for DI Gold and gave up one run on two hits. Russotti struck out six. Doubles out of the box, Jack Scanlon beats the tag at second to lead the bottom of the sixth. pic.twitter.com/e5njgTxPJS— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) August 1, 2019Coughlin and Xavier Morales (Webster Schroeder) were the only other players to get a hit for Red. Tristan Murray collected an RBI with a sacrifice fly in the sixth. Dylan Boprey’s sacrifice fly is part of 4-run 7th as DI Blue takes a 5-3 lead over DI Gold into the bottom of the 7th. pic.twitter.com/VsQ63kf0Ix— Paul Gotham (@PickinSplinters) July 31, 2019With two outs, DI Blue scored the first run of the game in the third on a double steal. Joseph Conroy (Bishop Kearney) scored while twin brother Paul Conroy (Bishop Kearney) advanced to second. Add to Google+ Taking advantage of two errors, DI Gold scored two to take the lead in the bottom of the fourth. Jett Kopalek (Rush-Henrietta) had the lone hit in the inning, driving in Joseph Alphonse (Olympia) with a single.last_img read more

McClaughry: A post-mortem on the 2016 Legislature

McClaughry: A post-mortem on the 2016 Legislature

first_imgby John McClaughry The 2016 legislative session is now history, and it’s worthwhile to assess its production. My criteria include preserving fiscal responsibility, advancing liberty, limiting government, and thwarting various hungry special interests. The basic facts are readily available from the thorough reporting by VTDigger.org. First, the Legislature managed to balance the FY2017 General Fund budget, once again by raising taxes and fees by $28 million. Wary of any obvious tax and fee increases in an election year, the tax committees found a convenient target – the mutual fund industry, almost entirely inhabited by out of staters. Hitting it up for $20.8 million closed most of the gap, without arousing Vermont taxpayers. Governor Shumlin had mounted a campaign to tax 1,200 doctors and dentists in independent practice, to extract more Medicaid money from Washington. That didn’t fly. Nor did a House-proposed increase in the employer tax to finance Medicaid, or a bank franchise tax increase. The Legislature also faithfully transferred the formula-required $306 million to the Education Fund.Perhaps most importantly, the Legislature backed off the VPIRG proposal to combat “climate change” by levying a hefty carbon tax on home heating oil, gasoline, diesel, natural gas and propane. Despite a long list of endorsers of the idea – the usual suspects – many legislators (including some Democrats) didn’t want to go into an election having voted to extract $500 million from Vermont consumers in its tenth year.The carbon tax proposal promised to return 90 percent of the revenues to selected taxpayers after the renewable energy and weatherization interests skimmed off the top 10 percent as a “societal benefit.” This unbelievable promise is reminiscent of President Obama’s promise, “If you like your health insurance plan, you can keep it.”The VPIRG-led “Energy Independent Vermont” coalition got more of its nose into the tent by getting an increase in gross fuel receipts taxes to raise another $2.9 million for “weatherization.” The coalition – now demanding “pollution pricing,” the latest euphemism for “carbon tax” – promises to come roaring back in 2017, so we haven’t heard the last of this bad idea.One brave little step was the privatizing of the risk management office that determines workers compensation claims. This will save $500,000. How this got through over the frantic opposition of the Vermont State Employees Association is just short of miraculous. It is a welcome exception to the VSEA maxim that “no matter how much privatization might save the taxpayers, none of it is ever acceptable.”One of Governor Shumlin’s final bright ideas was to have state government open a college savings account for all children born in Vermont, rich and poor alike, and find $250 to fund each of them. The argument: “Why should this responsibility be left to Mom and Dad, when our state government is ready and eager to hit up taxpayers for $250 a pop to get things moving?” The legislators, to their credit, didn’t buy it.The solons passed an energy siting bill that required towns upset by wind and solar impacts to buy into the state’s planning to force us to achieve “90 percent renewable energy by 2050.” In return for hugging the octopus, a concerned town would win “substantial deference” for its town plan before the pro-renewable and lawyer-intensive Public Service Board. The $300,000 promised to towns to adopt state-approved plans somehow disappeared from the appropriations bill. Passage of the siting bill will prove to be an illusory triumph for towns and citizens.The 2015 education consolidation bill (Act 46) seriously threatens to exterminate school choice in Vermont’s 90 tuition towns. The education establishment, led in the House by Speaker Shap Smith and Education Chair David Sharpe, stifled efforts by (mostly) Republicans to find a way to rescue parental choice within the new Unified Districts. Both parties have now accepted “strict cost containment’ – holding down school property tax rates by manipulating state caps and penalties until all school districts toe the state’s line. This is precisely what critics of Act 60 in 1997 said would happen. Farewell, local control.The health care “reform” bill groped about looking for a way to solve the chronic failure called Vermont Health Connect, awarded a further overdose of regulatory power to the Green Mountain Care Board, and shelled out another $100,000 to pay for a recurring study of single payer on the installment plan.A bill to make life easier and more predictable for independent contractors – reported 11-0 from the House Commerce and Economic Development Committee – disappeared due to the usual union opposition.Two small bright spots: the Legislature voted to protect the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers from negligence claims arising from accidents on their snowmobile trails. Also, it turned its back on a bunch of gun control bills despite lavish lobbying by the Bloomberg-financed gun control lobby.From the standpoint of the past five years, the money committees commendably produced a balanced budget with only a small infusion of new tax dollars. From the standpoint of what needs to be done – to rationalize health care, expand parental choice in education, and get the renewable industrial complex’s nose out of the trough – well, there’s always next year, with a new governor.John McClaughry is vice president of the Ethan Allen Institute (www.ethanallen.org(link is external)).last_img read more

Academy U18 duo suffer defeats in international series openers

Academy U18 duo suffer defeats in international series openers

first_imgBates was a second-half substitute as England were defeated 41-21 by France, while Lloyd started at full-back as a late try condemned Wales to 43-40 defeat to host South Africa in a high-scoring thriller.Trailing 31-0 at the break, England scored three second half tries through George Martin, Josh Gillespie and Raphael Quirke to reduce the deficit.Wales U18 were cruelly denied the perfect start to the U18 International Series by South Africa Schools after it looked like they had snatched victory at the death.Scarlets flanker Jac Morgan looked as if he had capped off the perfect end to an enthralling encounter when he caught South Africa napping to crash over with two minutes to go. But SA Schools replacement Jurich Claasens found a hole in the Wales defence to seal a 43-40 triumph at Boland Landbou.England and Wales face off in Stellenberg on Tuesday (August 14th, 1.15pm BST, live on S4C).last_img read more

Indiana’s MGP ready to embrace its spot in the bourbon world

Indiana’s MGP ready to embrace its spot in the bourbon world

first_imgMGP Ingredients is the distiller that bourbon lovers seem to love to hate. But now the once mostly anonymous name behind some of the biggest brands in bourbon is ready to own its place on the liquor shelf.It’s a coming out that wasn’t entirely planned. A couple years ago, consumers caught on that the massive distillery in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, was the source for some of their favorite bourbons and ryes, bottles they wrongly assumed were crafted in the back woods of Kentucky. Do you enjoy Bulleit, Angel’s Envy, George Dickel, Jefferson, Redemption or Smooth Ambler? Then you enjoy MGP-made whiskeys.Welcome to the era of contract distilling. It works much like store brand canned tomatoes do in the grocery industry. A handful of large producers distill alcohol, then sell it to companies who resell it under private labels. Some companies further age or filter the liquor, but many bottle it as it comes from MGP. And nearly all go to great trouble to craft elaborate stories about how their product was distilled, usually failing to mention that they didn’t actually distill it.But now MGP is ready to get into the game on its own merits and with its own name. This month the company launches Metze’s Select, the first time in more than two decades MGP will sell direct to consumers. The 93-proof high rye bourbon (made from a blend of three whiskeys from 2006 and 2008) is named for the company’s master distiller, Greg Metze, and is limited to a 6,000-bottle run with a suggested price of $74.99.This undated photo provided by MGP Ingredients shows a bottle of Metze’s Select Indiana straight bourbon whiskey. MGP Ingredients is the distiller that bourbon lovers seem to love to hate. But now the once mostly anonymous name behind some of the biggest brands in bourbon is ready to own its place on the liquor shelf. (MGP Ingredients via AP)“It just seemed like the perfect time,” Gus Griffin, MGP president and CEO, said in a telephone interview. “We had the inventory. We had the expertise. We had the craftsmanship. We waited until we had the concept.”The concept actually was born a year ago, when the company bottled a similar blend called Metze’s Medley, a giveaway that was offered as an incentive to donors to a local charity. “That was really the genesis of the idea. We said, ‘Wow! That felt really great. We can do this and it really showcases what MGP can really do,” Griffin said.The result is a round, smooth bourbon with a pleasant heat from the rye and a clean, caramel finish.And lessons were learned from the fallout over MGP’s role in the industry. Though buyers weren’t so much upset with MGP — whatever a label may say, a good whiskey is a good whiskey — they did feel misled by individual sellers. So with Metze’s Select, MGP favored label transparency, right down to printing the ages and mash bills of the three bourbons used in the blend on the front of the bottle.“We’ll be very interested to see the consumer reaction not just to the product itself, but the idea of MGP having its own and also of giving them more information,” Griffin said.J.M. Hirsch is the food editor for The Associated Press. He blogs at https://www.LunchBoxBlues.com and tweets at https://twitter.com/JM_Hirsch . Email him at [email protected]last_img read more