Category: yfbrnogm

Moment In Time: Ed Sheeran and The Killers perform at Electric Picnic in 2012

Moment In Time: Ed Sheeran and The Killers perform at Electric Picnic in 2012

first_img Moment In Time: Ed Sheeran and The Killers perform at Electric Picnic in 2012 WhatsApp Stradbally ladies having fun Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey. Electric Picnic 2012 was a huge success in its ninth year with sunshine and a star-studded line up.The festival offered a fantastic line up of acts including The Cure, The Killers, Ed Sheeran, Of Monsters and Men, Elbow, Christy Moore, Alabama Shakles, Hot Chip, The Roots and The xx.Nearly 35,000 revellers descended on the Cosby Estate for the eighth year of the music festival.The weekend started off grey and dreary on Friday morning but it quickly turned into a sunny weekend.Sunday brought huge crowds due to the introduction of day tickets which proved very popular.There were some complaints of headline acts like The Killers bringing a different crowd to the Electric Picnic which some thought took from the friendly atmosphere.Apart from a great weekend of music, Body and Soul proved a very popular place to relax while the Mindfield offered literature and spoken word.Check out some great pictures from Alf Harvey below:Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Flying high at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Ed Sheeran at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.The Vaccines at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.The Killers perform at Electric Picnic.Picture: Alf Harvey.Mary and Laura Murphy with Irene Mathews, Portlaoise at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Clare Coleman, Elaine Walsh, Shauna Whelehan and Laura Kearns, Stradbally at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.George Dobson, Portlaoise and friends at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Ruadh‡n and Caomh‡n Harvey, Tullamore at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Stradbally ladies having fun Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Gemma Corcoran, Ballyroan and Annette O’Hara, Kildare at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.at Electric Picnic 2012.Picture: Alf Harvey.Enjoying Electric Picnic.Picture: Alf Harvey. Home News Community Moment In Time: Ed Sheeran and The Killers perform at Electric Picnic… NewsCommunityWe Are LaoisMoment in Time Previous articleLISTEN: LaoisToday podcast as we say goodbye to our great colleague SiunNext articleElectric Picnic warning over ‘high strength drugs’ Bronagh Scully TAGS2012Electric PicnicMoment in Time GAA Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Pinterest Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Facebook Twitter WhatsApp By Bronagh Scully – 29th August 2019 Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebook GAA GAA last_img read more

Scotiabank to buy New Orleans investment boutique

Scotiabank to buy New Orleans investment boutique

Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Desjardins buys Montreal boutique firm Hexavest “The acquisition of Howard Weil is strategically important for Scotiabank, providing not only an expansion of our product footprint in the energy sector, but also dedicated equity sales, trading and research capabilities in the U.S.,” said Mike Durland, head of Scotiabank’s Global Capital Markets group. Details of the proposed deal were not material to Scotiabank’s earnings, the bank said in a statement. The addition of Howard Weil to its assets gives the bank a stronger position in energy investment banking where is already operates the Scotia Waterous division, with offices located in Houston, Hong Kong, London and Singapore. Scotiabank is Canada’s most international bank with operations across Latin America and the Caribbean and more than 75,000 employees in 55 countries. Shares of Scotiabank were down 30 cents to $52.64 on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Bank of Nova Scotia (TSX:BNS) said Wednesday it has agreed to buy New Orleans-based boutique energy investment firm Howard Weil Inc. for an undisclosed amount. Howard Weil, which also operates out of Houston, Texas, specializes in providing equity research, institutional sales and trading, and investment banking services for the oil and gas industry. Related news CI acquires US$5.1B San Diego-based RIA Canadian Press Keywords Mergers and acquisitionsCompanies Bank of Nova Scotia Cidel Asset Management to acquire fixed income manager read more

Economic growth down slightly in November

Economic growth down slightly in November

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media “While looking somewhat deep into the rear-view mirror, the decent month continues to point to a sturdy end to 2013 for the Canadian economy,” BMO chief economist Doug Porter wrote in a note. “The three-month trend in growth is now running at a nifty 3.8 per cent annualized clip and output is up 2.6 per cent from a year ago.” Statistics Canada said the output of goods-producing industries rose by 0.4 per cent in November, led by an increase in oil and gas extraction, which rose 2.6 per cent. Mining and quarrying was up 1.3 per cent, while utilities gained 2.1 per cent as cold weather boosted demand for electricity and natural gas. Manufacturing was down 0.5 per cent. The output of service industries rose 0.2 per cent as retail trade gained 0.8 per cent. Wholesale trade lost 0.6 per cent. TD Bank economist Leslie Preston said that with two out of three months now in hand for the fourth quarter, the economy looks to have built on the momentum of the third quarter. “However, the quarter likely ended on a sour note in December as severe winter weather led to power outages and otherwise crimped activity in many parts of the country,” Preston wrote in a report. “That leaves the economy with very weak momentum heading into the first quarter of 2014, which could now see a more modest growth tally.” Last week, the Bank of Canada said in its monetary policy report that economic growth in the second half of 2013 was better than expected and should pick up from an estimated 1.8 per cent in 2013 to 2.5 per cent both this year and next. The central bank expects global growth — led by stronger momentum in the U.S. — to rise from 2.9 per cent in 2013, to 3.4 per cent and 3.7 per cent in the following years. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said the modest growth was “an encouraging sign that Canada’s economy remains on the right track.” “With continued uncertainty in the global economy, it’s essential that we remain focused on creating jobs and growth here in Canada,” Flaherty said Friday. The federal budget is expected Feb. 11. The read on the economy came as Statistics Canada also revised December’s 45,900 job loss to 44,000 as part of its annual tweak of seasonal adjustment factors. The year-end unemployment rate was left unchanged at 7.2 per cent. Meanwhile, the Conference Board of Canada said its new composite leading index suggested the economy will grow in the first half of this year, but only modestly. The index, which looks at the performance of 10 components that track the short-term course of the economy, was up 0.3 per cent in December, matching gains in October and November. Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Household debt-to-income ratio fell in first quarter: Statscan Leading indicators signal steady rebound: OECDcenter_img Canadian Press The economy grew by 0.2 per cent month over month in November, boosted by the resource sector and marking the fifth straight monthly increase, Statistics Canada said Friday. The increase matched the expectations of economists and was just below the 0.3 per cent gain in October. Economy lost 68,000 jobs in May Keywords Economic indicators last_img read more

Ministry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinson

Ministry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinson

first_imgMinistry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinson UncategorizedMarch 11, 2008 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of State in the Ministry of Agriculture, J. C. Hutchinson, has reiterated the Ministry’s stance to facilitate the growth of small businesses in the sector.He was speaking at the official opening of a week-long Business Development Workshop, at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston, on March 10.Mr. Hutchinson said the workshop has come at an opportune time, because of the challenges to the agricultural sector brought about by trade liberalization. “This is forcing us to explore all the available opportunities for adding value to our primary production, in order to ensure the economic survival of small and medium-sized operators in the sector,” he said.The most recently published data from the Statistical Institute of Jamaica, (STATIN), revealed that small and micro business operators account for approximately 34 per cent of the Jamaican labour force.Additionally, a large segment of this group is involved in small scale agro-processing enterprises, or some type of cottage industry, which is a major source of income for rural women and business-minded youngsters in rural and marginalized communities, the State Minister said.He pointed out that owners of small businesses have been unable to take advantage of the economies of scale, from which larger enterprises benefit, by purchasing goods in bulk at cheaper prices.“We at the Ministry of Agriculture recognize this, and in keeping with our stated mission of facilitating growth and competitiveness at all levels of the sector, we continue to take steps to address what we see as two of the major challenges facing small and medium scale producers – lack of adequate business support services, and affordable financing. It is for this reason that we welcome training initiatives like today’s workshop,” Mr. Hutchinson said.The State Minister also mentioned the establishment of a Business Investment Centre by the ministry, which offers support to small businesses. “This business centre is geared to assist operators of small and medium-sized agricultural-based enterprises to access credit financing under the 7.8 per cent Development Bank of Jamaica and People’s Co-operative Bank loan facilities,” he said.“The centre,” he said, “which is managed by the ministry’s Agricultural Support Services Project (ASSP), provides financial management assistance to help farmers and potential agricultural investors to transform their business ideas into bankable projects.”Mr. Hutchinson also pointed out that in keeping with the ministry’s drive to stimulate competitive agriculture, the centre’s six-member team has been trained to screen applicants’ projects to ensure viability, prepare business plans and to link primary producers to available markets.“Since the establishment of the business centre in April 2007, it has facilitated the submission of loan applications valued at $140.3 million to PC banks across the island,” he informed.The Inter-American Institute for Co-operation on Agriculture (IICA) Representative in Jamaica, Cynthia Currie, said the workshop is targetted at persons in the food or food-processing business and would cover a variety of topics dealing with food processing to include: technical processing and business models; food; science and technology requirements; food hygiene and sanitation; packaging and labelling; equipment options and marketing.“As such, this is a particularly useful workshop in an environment where value-added production in the agricultural sector is being increasingly promoted,” she said.“In the Caribbean, we are very fortunate to have so many rich-based products that we can use and then turn into value-added products that can then be sold to the marketplace,” she added.The workshop, which is being held under the theme: ‘Business Opportunities in Agro-Processing’, is sponsored by the Caribbean Development Bank and IICA in partnership with the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA). RelatedMinistry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinson RelatedMinistry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinsoncenter_img RelatedMinistry to Facilitate Growth of Small Businesses – Hutchinson Advertisementslast_img read more

Path Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable

Path Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable

first_imgRelatedPath Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable RelatedPath Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH) is continuing its mission to better the life of the country’s most poor and vulnerable, through social assistance initiatives as well as the promotion of good health and education.There are 243,000 beneficiaries registered with PATH, which is more than 100 per cent of the original target, when the programme was rolled out in 2002, with a target of 236,000. Speaking with JIS News, Director of PATH, Colette Roberts-Risden, explains that in 2006/07, there were approximately 220,000 registered beneficiaries but that this has increased by some 20,000 during the past year.The breakdown of beneficiaries shows 71,000 in the zero to six age group; 110,000 in the six to 17 age group; 36,000 over the age of 60; 6,000 disabled persons; 1,000 pregnant and lactating women; and 18,000 poor relief beneficiaries. The Government recently expanded the target for the programme to 252,000 beneficiaries, “so we still have scope to add more persons,” Mrs. Roberts-Risden says.Since inception, some $6 billion has been expended on the programme, and approximately $5.4 billion on benefits. The PATH Director notes that while the compliance rate averages some 87 per cent, one of the main areas where persons complain of having difficulty is in getting the children to school particularly in rural areas, as transportation costs are higher.Mrs. Roberts-Risden says the problem affects children mainly at the secondary level, as these students have to travel much further than those at the basic and primary levels.Under a pending US$40 million loan agreement with the World Bank, this, among other issues, will be addressed. The agreement will effect far-reaching reform of the social safety net system, under the second phase of the reform programme.This phase will involve improvement of the effectiveness of PATH; building capacity for welfare to work; improving the administration of the public sector pension system; building capacity for the completion of pension reform; and the development of a holistic social protection strategy. Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Information, Culture, Youth and Sport, Faith Innerarity, explained at a recent post-Cabinet press briefing that beneficiary families will still be provided with grants, but that “there will be some differentials in terms of what is given.”This, she said, is related to the transition from primary to secondary school, as there are a number of students, who are unable to move on to the secondary level, because of financial issues. Specifically, at the grade seven level, PATH beneficiaries will be receiving a benefit that is 50 per cent higher than the normal core benefit provided under the programme. In addition, students who are moving on to grade 10 will receive a benefit that is 75 per cent higher than the core benefit.Mrs. Innerarity said that of importance are the gender-related difficulties that had been identified, with males at a severe disadvantage in terms of educational attainment. Consequently, there will be a further incentive for boys, who will get a higher grant to encourage them to remain in school. There will also be a one-off grant or bonus for students moving to tertiary institutions.“Education is important in terms of social mobility, to move people out of poverty, but in order for this to be achieved, attaining a tertiary level education is of critical importance, hence the second phase of the social safety net reform is seeking to build on the earlier phase, to introduce new elements that would ensure, not just a short-term poverty alleviation programme, but really lead toward the achievement of the longer term goals,” she explained.According to the Permanent Secretary, the welfare to work aspect of the programme will be pushed, as there are a number of persons within the beneficiary household, who, although they are in the economically active age group, also need assistance.“This assistance must be in a different form, in terms of the provision of employment,” she noted, adding that students, who benefit from PATH, do need some level of support in making that transition from school to work.“And so the welfare to work programme, which is a new component, will be addressing this and will seek to build capacity in terms of assisting persons to make that transition,” Mrs. Innerarity informed.In terms of the long-term holistic strategy, the second phase of the safety net reform programme will look at the National Insurance Scheme (NIS).“Currently, a large proportion of the workforce is in the informal sector and not contributing to the social insurance scheme. Later, these persons become a burden in terms of social assistance programmes, so a part of the reform is to strengthen the social insurance programme by ensuring greater compliance and encouraging more persons in the informal sector to participate,” Mrs. Innerarity said.Meanwhile, Mrs. Roberts Risden says the cash card system, which was introduced last year as a pilot, has been receiving good response, with some 2,000 families receiving their payments via this method.“It has been a gradual increase, and we have been deliberately doing that, because many of our beneficiaries are in deep rural areas and we don’t want beneficiaries to accept the cash card and it becomes an inconvenience for them to get their benefits, because of course they need to be close to ATM machines,” she explains.An evaluation of the pilot was done, involving more than 70 families, and Mrs. Roberts-Risden says that “the families were very happy for the cash card method of payment. It allowed them flexibility.Persons felt encouraged, because they now felt a sense of independence when they can take out a card and pay for their goods at the supermarket or wherever accepts the card. We do have some areas in terms of training the beneficiaries how to properly use the card. Overall the feedback has been positive”.The reform of the social safety net system was launched in 2000 and was fully implemented in 2002, with PATH being the main element. Mrs. Innerarity said PATH has recorded “appreciable success” in terms of encouraging poor families to send their children to school.This has been done through the provision of grants and their specific conditionalities in terms of school attendance and health checks for children, babies, and for pregnant and lactating women. Despite the success, she said, it has become necessary for PATH to be more effective, as there has been a number of supply side difficulties, linked to issues such as the cost and inadequacy of transportation, unemployment, and the cost of school supplies.In the last financial year, PATH was allocated $1.46 billion to provide better, and more cost-effective social assistance to the poor and most vulnerable in the society.It was anticipated that during this fiscal period, the programme would make monthly payments to eligible beneficiaries; implement an electronic payment system; complete the establishment of an information system to support the efficient management of the programme; continue the institutionalization phase of the programme; continue the re-certification exercise of all PATH beneficiaries; and complete the legislative framework of the programme.In addition to providing benefits to the most vulnerable, PATH aims to consolidate major income transfer programmes into unified benefit programmes that ensure meaningful levels of benefits; a cost-efficient and accessible delivery system; and access to benefits linked to desirable behaviour changes for promoting investment in human capital and development of the poor, especially children.center_img RelatedPath Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable Path Continues to Better the Condition of the Poor and Vulnerable UncategorizedMarch 14, 2008last_img read more

April 2021 euro area bank lending survey

April 2021 euro area bank lending survey

first_imgApril 2021 euro area bank lending survey ECBCredit standards for loans to firms tightened moderately Demand for loans by firms and households decreased ECB’s monetary policy measures remain supportive of lending conditions and volumesAccording to the April 2021 euro area bank lending survey (BLS), credit standards – i.e. banks’ internal guidelines or loan approval criteria – tightened moderately for loans or credit lines to enterprises (net percentage of banks standing at 7%, see Chart 1) in the first quarter of 2021. Credit standards eased slightly in net terms for loans to households for house purchase (net percentage of -2%) and tightened moderately further in net terms for consumer credit and other lending to households (net percentage of 5%). Banks referred mainly to risk perceptions related to borrowers’ creditworthiness and a lower risk tolerance as factors having a tightening impact on their credit standards. By contrast, competitive pressure contributed mostly to an easing of credit standards. In the second quarter of 2021, banks expect credit standards to tighten for loans to firms and households.Banks’ overall terms and conditions – i.e. the actual terms and conditions agreed in loan contracts – remained unchanged for loans to firms and eased, on balance, for housing loans in the first quarter of 2021. In both cases, margins on average loans narrowed while banks reported wider margins for riskier loans in net terms.Banks reported, on balance, a further decline in firms’ demand for loans or drawing of credit lines in the first quarter of 2021, i.e. a larger percentage of banks indicated a decline rather than an increase in firms’ loan demand (see Chart 2). Financing needs for fixed investment continued to dampen loan demand as firms, especially in sectors more affected by the pandemic, tended to postpone investment. In addition, firms did not, on balance, demand additional financing for working capital, reflecting the availability of liquidity buffers and direct government liquidity support, especially to small and medium-sized enterprises. Banks also reported a net decrease in demand for housing loans in the first quarter of 2021. While consumer confidence dampened demand for housing loans, demand continued to be supported by the low general level of interest rates and, to a lesser extent, housing market prospects. For consumer credit and other lending to households, a larger net percentage of banks reported a decline in demand, driven mainly by lower consumer confidence and decreased spending on durable goods. In the second quarter of 2021, banks expect net demand to increase for loans to firms and households.Euro area banks’ access to retail and wholesale funding continued to improve in the first quarter of 2021, according to the banks surveyed. The BLS also asked banks to report on the impact of the ECB’s monetary policy measures on bank lending. The ECB’s asset purchase programme (APP), the pandemic emergency purchase programme (PEPP) and the third series of targeted longer-term refinancing operations (TLTRO III) all had a positive impact on banks’ liquidity positions and market financing conditions. These measures, as well as the ECB’s negative deposit facility rate, had an easing impact on bank lending conditions and a positive impact on lending volumes, mainly for loans to firms. TLTRO III in particular has strongly supported bank lending over the past six months. At the same time, banks indicated a negative impact of the ECB’s asset purchases and the negative deposit facility rate on their profitability through a negative impact on their net interest income. This was mitigated by the ECB’s two-tier system for remunerating excess liquidity holdings.The euro area bank lending survey, which is conducted four times a year, was developed by the Eurosystem in order to improve its understanding of bank lending behaviour in the euro area. The results reported in the April 2021 survey relate to changes observed in the first quarter of 2021 and expected changes in the second quarter of 2021, unless otherwise indicated. The April 2021 survey round was conducted between 11 and 26 March 2021. A total of 143 banks were surveyed in this round, with a response rate of 100%. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:bank, ECB, Emergency, euro, Government, house, Impact, Investment, loan, loan approval, market, pandemic, purchase, spending, survey, wholesalelast_img read more

CU Law Expert: Historical Courts Offer Hope For Past Injustices

CU Law Expert: Historical Courts Offer Hope For Past Injustices

first_img Published: Jan. 23, 2005 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail When University of Colorado at Boulder Distinguished Law Professor Charles Wilkinson was asked to testify on behalf of an American Indian accused of murder, he jumped at the opportunity. But this was not your ordinary murder case. It happened over 146 years ago. Originally tried in the Oregon Territory in what is now the state of Washington, the man accused of murder was called Leschi, the last chief of the Nisqually Tribe. After two trials, the first of which ended in a hung jury, Chief Leschi was found guilty of killing a militiaman during a skirmish and hanged on Feb. 19, 1858. Since that moment, members of the Nisqually tribe have campaigned to vindicate Leschi, who they say was wrongly accused and hanged for a crime he did not commit. On Dec. 10, 2004, the state of Washington convened a one-time “Historical Court of Justice” to re-examine the Leschi trial. At the heart of the case is whether Leschi should have been tried for murder. In 1854, a state of war existed between the Nisqually and the U.S. Army, which, by law, makes Leschi a legal combatant. Under laws of war a legal combatant cannot be held accountable for the death of an enemy soldier. “He was a lawful enemy combatant and he was the chief of the Nisqually tribe,” said Wilkinson. “He was their war leader and his war was righteous.” Wilkinson is an expert in American Indian tribal nationhood and sovereignty. His testimony helped to build support for Leschi’s legal status as leader of his tribe and its war leader. “That laid the foundation for the Army specialists to testify on law of war as it applies to wars between nations,” explained Wilkinson. “The fact is Chief Leschi was a dignitary, a general in our terms, a chief in theirs, who deserved to be treated according to the law of nations and the law of war.” A panel of the state’s highest judges heard the facts as presented by the prosecution and defense in the one-day trial and rendered a verdict of not guilty, exonerating Chief Leschi. Wilkinson believes courts of historical justice are a positive tool for righting injustices from the past but adds they need to be used carefully. “The idea that Chief Leschi was hung as a common criminal, that his status as a great leader of a nation wasn’t recognized, has always been part of the Nisqually stories about how wrong his trial was and that his murder conviction ought to be wiped from the history books,” he said. “I don’t think that we always stop to appreciate how important it is to Indian people to have some of the historical wrongs acknowledged and that the moral aspect of it is important to have recognized,” said Wilkinson. “Of course, it’s too late for Leschi, but it’s not too late for history.”last_img read more

Gov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rum

Gov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rum

first_imgRelatedGov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rum FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — The Jamaica Intellectual Property Office (JIPO) has been instructed to fast-track efforts to protect brand Jamaica in the area of rum through Geographical Indication (GI) registration. Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Christopher Tufton, who made the revelation during a tour of the Spanish Town Road manufacturing and bottling facilities of J Wray and Nephew e yesterday (Sept. 14), said the move will  significantly boost brand recognition of the product. He informed that a fast-paced timetable of mid to year-end 2012 has been set for the promulgation of the relevant GI legislation to facilitate the process. A Geographical Indication is a name or sign used on certain products, which corresponds to a specific geographical location or origin (e.g. a town, region, or country). The use of a GI may act as a certification that the product possesses certain qualities, is made according to traditional methods, or enjoys a certain reputation, due to its geographical origin. In the context of the Jamaican product, this designation will protect the integrity of Jamaican rums, discourage piracy and product counterfeiting and in general, enhance the competitiveness of the product.  Commending Wray and Nephew for continuing to “grow and modernise the iconic enterprise”, the Minister emphasised that despite the challenges, manufacturing has a future in Jamaica. He said that at this important stage in the country’s economic life, manufacturers like Wray and Nephew need to send a strong signal and become the catalyst to spur others to invest and build. The Minister charged manufacturers to strategise and improve operations, noting that “this was the best time in 30 years to retool and assume critical efficiencies.”  Bemoaning what he referred to as the “entrenchment of uncompetitiveness” because of the acquisition and utilisation of dated technology, Dr. Tufton advises that in today’s scenario, the emphasis must be on “following the lead of one’s competitor,”  rather than on obtaining technology that has been outdated and discarded. Re-tooling in cutting edge technology, he stated, can save as much 10 per cent of the cost of production. The Minister noted further that with capital equipment depreciation (which allows for the write-off of the cost of equipment over its estimated useful life) manufacturers now had a great opportunity to retool and modernise and in so doing, enhance their productivity, compete successfully and grow the Jamaican economy. By Allan Brooks, JIS Reporter Advertisements Gov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rum CommerceSeptember 16, 2011center_img RelatedGov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rum RelatedGov’t Moves to Protect Jamaican Rumlast_img read more

PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions

PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions

first_imgAdvertisements By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporter . FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Energy and Mining, Hillary Alexander, says there is need to implement provisions of Jamaica’s energy policy to address challenges, including high costs. Speaking at the inaugural Dr, Raymond Wright Memorial Lecture at the Mona Campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI), on Thursday (November 10), Ms. Alexander noted that the Government spent over $1 billion importing some 20 million barrels of oil last year. Transportation and electricity generation accounted for a significant percentage of the consumption of the imported oil, at 28 and 33 per cent, respectively. Ms. Alexander pointed to figures for 2010, which showed that the percentage of alternative energy generated amounted to the equivalent of some 816,000 barrels of oil, which she termed “not an insignificant saving on our fuel import bill”.  “Today, there is consensus that energy is the key to revolutionizing our productive base and our national competitiveness, even as the current trends are serious causes for concern and require both short and long term solutions,” she said. She noted that Dr. Wright, the late former Group Managing Director of the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ), understood the challenges associated with the availability and provisions of energy, locally. “He understood that the challenge for manufacturers, investors and other players in the business sector, is to be creative and innovative in implementing cleaner energy solutions, in conserving and doing more with what we have,” she stated. She said Dr. Wright saw and embraced the need for investing in cleaner technologies, and the adoption of energy management strategies placing greater reliance on alternative energy sources to allow developers and producers a competitive advantage  in the global economy. The Permanent Secretary said Dr. Wright was also a proponent of exploring the wide range of low carbon technologies available, as well as others that need to be pursued and implemented in the fight against climate change. “He knew that the transition towards clean energy is a part of the responsibility that we have to preserve the environment, not just for ourselves, but for future generations. And we have been exploring a number of the solutions to address these challenges,” she said.  She noted that the wind powered Wigton Farm is now up to 38 megawatts, and the ministry is exploring the possibility of using mini hydro, as well as several other options to add to the diversification goals. In expressing satisfaction with the work of the Energy and Mining Ministry’s staff over the last two years in modernising the energy infrastructure and pursuing energy diversification, she acknowledged that the initiatives would have a long term impact on the society. “Dr. Wright has been a part of this; he has been an integral part of this, in fact, and he contributed to our national energy policy. We have an enviable policy framework, but… that’s not enough. We have to now move to implementation,” Ms. Alexander stressed Guest presenter at the lecture was Alcan Professor of Caribbean Sustainable Development, Institute for Sustainable Development, University of the West Indies (UWI), Anthony Clayton, who spoke on “The Transition to a Clean Energy Economy”. The lecture formed part of activities in observance of CARICOM Energy Week, November 6 to 12. The late Dr. Wright, who died in July after a prolonged illness, joined the then newly formed Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica Group of Companies in 1979, as Director of Exploration. He rose through the ranks to be appointed Group Managing Director in 1994, a position he held for 11 years until he was appointed Special Projects Manager. RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions PS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions TechnologyNovember 11, 2011 RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisions RelatedPS Urges Use of Energy Policy Provisionslast_img read more

Soapberry Operator Looking At Providing Treated Water For Irrigation

Soapberry Operator Looking At Providing Treated Water For Irrigation

first_imgRelatedWork to Begin on US$4.2 Million Sewage Treatment Plants RelatedPlant Trees to Reduce Effects of Climate Change Story HighlightsThe Central Wastewater Treatment Company (CWTC) Limited, which operates the Soapberry Wastewater Treatment Plant in St. Catherine, is looking into the feasibility of making treated water from the plant available for irrigation purposes.This was disclosed by Managing Director of CWTC Limited, Keith Goodison, at a JIS Think Tank on October 7.He noted that the study is expected to indicate the level of consistency in the water quality and the frequency of demand for the water, among other things. RelatedNLA Head Praises Customer Service Competition Soapberry Operator Looking At Providing Treated Water For Irrigation EnvironmentOctober 9, 2015Written by: O. Rodger Hutchinson Photo: JIS PhotographerManaging Director of Central Wastewater Treatment Company (CWTC) Limited, Keith Goodison, addresses a JIS Think Tank on October 7.center_img Soapberry Operator Looking At Providing Treated Water For IrrigationJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay The Central Wastewater Treatment Company (CWTC) Limited, which operates the Soapberry Wastewater Treatment Plant in St. Catherine, is looking into the feasibility of making treated water from the plant available for irrigation purposes.This was disclosed by Managing Director of CWTC Limited, Keith Goodison, at a JIS Think Tank on October 7.“We’re doing a study and we expect to have a position by next year. We’re looking at hardy crops like sugar cane to use the water as it has nutrients that are consistent with expansion of those crops. So by next year (October), we should be able to define clearly how we go about using the reused (treated) water,” he said.He noted that the study is expected to indicate the level of consistency in the water quality and the frequency of demand for the water, among other things.Mr. Goodison said that such a move would reduce the pressure on the National Water Commission’s (NWC) resources and increase the availability of potable water for residential use.He informed that specialised equipment would have to be put in place to allow for the supply of the water.The US$50 million Soapberry facility, which treats wastewater from Kingston and St. Andrew and parts of St. Catherine, is having a major impact in addressing the pollution of the Kingston Harbour.The sewage, which enters the ponds at the plant, is converted into clear water which meets stringent international standards of being clean enough to be pumped into the nearby Rio Cobre leading into the harbour, or to be used in the irrigation of agricultural lands.Mr. Goodison told JIS News that there is close collaboration with the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) to ensure that quality standards are being met.“We have to submit reports on a quarterly basis to NEPA. We have to tell them exactly what we have done and how we’ve done it because we discharge into the Rio Cobre, which goes into the sea. These reports are monitored and tabled to keep track of the performances,” he informed.The Soapberry Treatment Plant, which is in its seventh year of commercial operation, is handling 68 per cent of its 18 million gallons daily capacity.This is expected to change dramatically with the inclusion of additional housing developments including Caymanas Estate, and other projects in Portmore and Kingston and St. Andrew. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Advertisementslast_img read more